University Studies Program and Policies

Approval recommended by WSU FA Academic Affairs and Curriculum Committee on May 3, 2000.

Approved by WSU Faculty Senate on May 8, 2000.

Accepted by Administration at Meet and Confer on May 15, 2000

The University Studies Program of Winona State University provides a broad base of skills and knowledge to equip students for informed, responsible citizenship in a changing world. It thereby distinguishes a college degree from a technical or occupational training program certificate. The program provides opportunities for students to evaluate their cultural and social inheritance critically, to think scientifically in both the natural and social spheres, to think beyond the boundaries of their own culture, and to understand the expressive arts. It also enhances reasoning, analytic, and communication skills that students will need to perform well in a wide range of occupations and post-graduate programs. Finally, the program provides the opportunity for students to explore how an understanding of the connections among these diverse bodies of skill and knowledge enhance their ability to live well and ethically in the contemporary world.

All students, including transfer students, must complete the University Studies Program in order to graduate from Winona State University. Transfer students whose general education requirement has been waived because of receipt of an Associate of Arts Degree from a community college or completion of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum at another institution must nevertheless successfully complete the University Studies Program flag requirements explained below.

 

Upon successful completion of the University Studies, students should be able to demonstrate the following characteristics of a college and university graduate…

A. ability to read, write, and speak appropriate English at levels significantly above that which is expected of a high school graduate;

B. familiarity with the various ways in which information is produced, gathered, processed, and used;

C. ability to reason, understand, and manipulate ideas or numbers;

D. familiarity with various forms of human expression (written, oral, artistic, physical);

E. knowledge of and sensitivity toward those aspects of life and the environment that are common to all life as well as those aspects that display diversity;

F. willingness to accept appropriate responsibilities and to practice freedom, justice, and equality for all; and

G. commitment to lifelong learning and cultivation of intellectual curiosity.

 

I. Governance Structure

A. University Studies Subcommittee

The University Studies Subcommittee (USS) is a standing subcommittee reporting to the Academic Affairs and Curriculum Committee (A2C2). The USS will consist of representation from each college and from the English, Communication Studies and Mathematics/Statistics Departments. The members will be drawn from among the members and alternate members of A2C2. A2C2 will elect the members. Members will serve staggered three-year terms. The Director of the University Studies Program will be a non-voting ex-officio member of the USS and will chair the committee.

 

B. University Studies Director

1. The responsibilities of the Faculty Director are as follows:

a. oversee the final stage of implementing the University Studies Program;

b. serve as chair and ex-officio non-voting member of the University Studies Subcommittee of A2C2;

c. oversee the section(s) of the catalog devoted to the University Studies Program;

d. direct production and distribution of publicity materials concerning university studies to faculty and students;

e. direct dissemination of University Studies Program objectives and purpose in the First Year Orientation course;

f. coordinate with Faculty development programming related to development of Unity and Diversity courses and implementation of the upper division flag requirements;

g. coordinate assessment of the program with the university assessment coordinator.

h. advocate for team teaching possibilities in University Studies courses.

 

2. Qualifications

The candidate must be a full time member of the Winona State University faculty.

 

3. Compensation

The faculty director will receive 3/8 reassigned time for the academic year.

 

4. Term

The term of appointment is 3 years, and is open for renewal.

II. Departments, Disciplines and Course Placement

A. Upper division courses and courses with prerequisites are permitted in the University Studies Program.

B. Courses in the Arts and Sciences Core may be taken from a single department.

C. In the Arts and Sciences Core it is understood that departments and programs excluded from the list of departments normally associated with the areas of study may submit courses for approval in those core areas.

D. Courses in the Basic Skills or Unity and Diversity categories may fulfill both major and University Studies requirements. Students can use a course to meet requirements in any major, minor, option or concentration requiring the course. However, students may not use a course in her/his major to meet an Arts and Sciences Core requirement unless it is an additional requirement. Those courses are noted under the Major Requirements with an asterisk *. (Credit earned in the course counts only once toward the minimum 128 semester credits required for graduation.)

E. A course may be approved to satisfy only one set of outcomes.

F. Students may not fulfill more than one Course Requirement with a single course.

G. Approved sequences of courses may be used to satisfy a University Studies Program requirement.

H. Flagged courses will normally be upper division courses within the student's major. A course may carry only one flag per 3 semester credits.

 

III. Transfer Policy

A.. Successful completion of the WSU University Studies Course Requirements fulfills the requirements of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum.

B. Students transferring to WSU with an associate degree (i.e. A.S. or A.A.S.) from an accredited Minnesota community college, non-Minnesota community college or any four-year college or university can normally anticipate that they will meet the WSU University Studies Course Requirements once they have completed a total of 40 semester hours. Those 40 hours must include humanities, the natural sciences and social sciences (as defined by WSU) and include coursework equivalent to the courses required in the basic skills. (Drawn from current WSU catalog.)

C. Transfer students who receive a waiver of the University Studies Course Requirements must complete the Flag requirements in the University Studies Program.

 

IV. Course Approval Process

The USS will review courses submitted by departments for inclusion in the University Studies Program. Courses will receive approval for a fixed period. Approval will automatically expire if the course is not submitted for review before the end of that fixed period. In order to stagger workload, in the first round of review the length of the fixed period will vary from 4 to 6 years. Thereafter, the fixed period will be 6 years.

A. Required Courses

1. Course proposals must address all specified outcomes.

2. The course proposal must include documentation of Course Requirements and learning activities designed to meet the course outcomes specified for the area.

3. The course proposal must include a course description that clearly identifies the course as a University Studies Course and the Course Requirement which it satisfies.

4. The course description should include information directed to the student which clearly identifies course activities and assignments that address the course outcomes.

5. Course sequences may be submitted for approval to satisfy the area requirements. In this case, it must be demonstrated that the relevant outcomes are met across the approval must be submitted for all courses in the sequence. Note: The University Studies Program requirement is met when the course sequence is successfully completed. Students will not receive University Studies credit for partial completion of an approved course sequence.

6. The USS may request other material (e.g., textbooks) for review in evaluating course a proposal.

7. The USS may request additional information for re-approval.

 

B. Flagged Courses

1. The USS recognizes that decisions as to which courses meet department flag requirements reside with the department offering the courses. Nevertheless, departments are required to demonstrate how flagged courses address the relevant outcomes for each flag.

2. Departments should submit course descriptions for flagged courses to the USS and the syllabus should clearly identify the course as a course that satisfies a flag requirement within the University Studies

3. The course descriptions for flagged courses should include information directed to students which clearly identifies activities and assignments that address the outcomes.

4. The USS committee has the right to comment on department plans for flagged courses and to offer suggestions

5. No flagged course will satisfy University Studies Course Requirements in the University Studies Program.

V. Implementation Date

A. The University Studies Program will be implemented in Fall Semester 2001.

 

WSU UNIVERSITY STUDIES REQUIREMENTS
Approval recommended by the WSU FA Academic Affairs and Curriculum Committee on April 12, 2000.

Approved by the WSU FA Senate on May 8, 2000.

Accepted by administration at Meet and Confer May 15, 2000

 

I. Course Requirements (46 semester hours)

A. Basic Skills - l2 semester hours

1. College Reading and Writing - 4 S.H.

2. Oral Communication - 3 S.H.

3. Mathematics - 3 S.H.

4. Physical Development and Wellness - 2 S.H.

 

B. Arts & Sciences Core: minimum of 22 semester hours

1. Humanities - 6 S.H

2. Natural Science (with lab) - 7 S.H.

3. Social Science - 6 S.H.

4. Fine & Performing Arts - 3 S.H.

 

C. Unity and Diversity: minimum of 12 semester hours

1. Critical Analysis - 3 S.H.

2. Science and Social Policy - 3 S.H.

3. Global or Multicultural Perspectives - 3 S.H.

4. Contemporary Citizenship or Democratic Institutions - 3 S.H.

 II. Flag Requirements (12 semester hours)

 

A. Writing Flag - 6 S.H.

B. Oral Flag - 3 S.H.

C. Mathematics/Statistics or Critical Analysis Flag - 3 S.H.

I. Course Requirements (46 S.H.)

A. Basic Skills (12 S.H.)

1. College Reading and Writing (4 S.H.)

The purpose of the College Reading and Writing requirement is to help WSU students increase their critical reading, thinking, and writing skills. The course will help students develop a mature writing style and an ability to integrate material from multiple sources with their own writing. The course will further emphasize writing as essential to academic learning and intellectual development. Only approved courses offered by the Department of English can be used to satisfy the University Studies requirements for Basic Skills in College Reading and Writing.

The course is designed to establish a foundation for the reading and writing done in later college courses, supporting a larger writing-across-the-curriculum educational experience; therefore, students should take it as soon as possible, preferably in their first year and certainly no later than their third semester.

The course must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. read challenging texts that reflect important cultural themes and demand critical thinking;

b. analyze the rhetoric and structure of (their own and others') arguments;

c. summarize and critique examples of mature expository and argumentative prose;

d. revise through multiple drafts and critical readings to create and complete successful essays;

e. formulate intelligent claims and make purposeful, appropriate documented use of authoritative sources as supporting evidence;

f. make use of basic tools of research, such as general indexes, periodicals, and on-line databases;

g. construct coherent essays based on reading, interpreting, analyzing, critiquing, and synthesizing texts;

h. adapt the structure, content, and tone of their writing to the knowledge and attitudes of their audience;

i. use vivid, concrete language; concise, varied sentences; unified, cohesive paragraphs; gender inclusive English; and a college-level vocabulary; and

j. proofread, edit, and correct their final copy for common errors of spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and usage.

 

2. Oral Communication (3 S.H.)

The purpose of the basic Oral Communication requirement is to provide all students with the knowledge and experience required to enable them to become highly competent communicators by the time they graduate. A goal of he Oral Communication course in the University Studies program is to produce students who are skilled at expressing their ideas effectively, and who are skilled at interacting with others in dyadic and group contexts.

The basic Oral Communication course should be viewed as a starting point, supporting a larger communication-across-the-curriculum program educational experience. Only approved courses offered by the Department of Communications Studies can be used to satisfy the University Studies requirements for Basic Skills in Oral Communications. Students should complete the class during their first two years.

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. deliver a self-prepared speech in a public setting with a reasonable level of competency;

b. demonstrate the basic principles for organizing ideas appropriately for accomplishing informative and persuasive communication objectives;

c. understand and demonstrate the principles of rhetorical sensitivity and effective, audience-centered message adaptation, utilizing gender-neutral English;

d. locate, use, and correctly cite appropriate evidence in supporting their claims;

e. demonstrate communication behaviors appropriate for effective comprehensive and supportive listening;

f. understand and be able to apply the communication behaviors appropriate for the constructive management of intra-group conflict;°

g. understand the skills, roles, and methods of proceeding in task groups in order to achieve high levels of motivation, productivity and member satisfaction and to obtain high-quality decisions and/or outputs; and

h. understand the components of the communication process and how they enhance and/or hinder the effective exchange of information and ideas.

°revision approved by A2C2 3.19.2003; WSUFAS 3.31.2003; WSU Administration 4.7.2003.

 

3. Mathematics (3 S.H.)

The purpose of the Mathematics requirement in University Studies is to help students develop an appreciation of the uses and usefulness of mathematical models of our world, as applied in a variety of specific contexts. Students should complete the requirement as soon as possible, preferably in their first year and certainly no later than their third semester. Only approved courses offered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics can be used to satisfy the University Studies requirements for Basic Skills in Mathematics. Each of these courses must address at least four of the following outcomes.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. use logical reasoning by studying mathematical patterns and relationships;

b. use mathematical models to describe real-world phenomena and to solve real-world problems - as well as understand the limitations of models in making predictions and drawing conclusions;

c. organize data, communicate the essential features of the data, and interpret the data in a meaningful way;

d. do a critical analysis of scientific and other research;

e. extract correct information from tables and common graphical displays, such as line graphs, scatter plots, histograms, and frequency tables;

f. express the relationships illustrated in graphical displays and tables clearly and correctly in words; and/or

g. use appropriate technology to describe and solve quantitative problems.

4. Physical Development and Wellness (2 S.H.)

The purpose of the Physical Development and Wellness requirement is to provide students with fundamental knowledge and practical skills in the areas of lifetime physical activity, health awareness and wellness. Such courses offer experiences designed to initiate quality lifetime health, nutrition, fitness, leisure and wellness habits in a challenging technologically focused and service oriented society. These courses will offer the student the opportunity to complement and enhance their educational foundation by learning how to live a healthy lifestyle. Only approved courses offered by the Department of Physical Education and Recreation or the Department of Health and Human Performance can be used to satisfy the University Studies requirements for Physical Development and Wellness. Each of these courses must address at least seven of the following outcomes.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. learn skills that will improve the quality and length of their lives;

b. make proactive choices that lead to a healthier lifestyle;

c. explore dimensions of personal health promotion and disease prevention;

d. attain skills necessary to make critical decisions regarding health-related issues;

e. understand health as multidimensional, involving the whole person's relationship to the total environment;

f. utilize physical activity to reduce risk of illness and injury and provide relaxation, socialization, and balance in their lives;

g. become intelligent consumers of good healthy habits and information;

h. enhance creative use of leisure time;

i. develop skills consistent with efficient levels of human movement;

j. become accountable for their health and leisure choices and the impact of those choices on self, others, and the environment; and/or

k. understand basic nutritional considerations that will aid in healthy food choices and lifestyles.

 

B. Arts and Sciences Core (22 S.H.)

Courses in the Arts and Sciences Core will be taught by faculty drawn from disciplines normally identified with those areas. Exceptions to the rule are possible, but they are not normative and must be supported by documentation.

 

1. Humanities (6 S.H.)

The purpose of the Humanities requirement in the University Studies program is to provide a framework for understanding the nature and scope of human experience. Humanities courses explore the search for meaning and value in human life by examining its expression in cultural forms and texts, literature and the arts. Courses must be selected from an approved list; departments normally included in the Humanities are Art, Communication Studies, English, Foreign Languages, History, Music, Philosophy, and Theater and Dance.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular Humanities discipline;

b. understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations; and

c. understand the role of critical analysis (e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical, rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expressions of human experience.

 

2. Social Science (6 S.H.)

The purpose of the Social Science University Studies requirement is to assist students to understand and explain the economic, political, psychological, and sociological perspectives regarding human behavior. Courses must be selected from an approved list; departments normally included in the Social Sciences are Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology (including Geography).

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. understand humans as individuals and as parts of larger social systems;

b. understand the historical context of the social sciences;

c. identify problems and frame research questions relating to humans and their experience;

d. become familiar with the process of theory-building and theoretical frameworks used by the social sciences;

e. understand research methods used in the social sciences;

f. describe and detail discipline-specific knowledge and its applications; and

g. understand differences among and commonalties across humans and their experience, as tied to such variables as gender, race, socioeconomic status, etc.

 

3. Natural Science (with lab - 7 S.H.)

The purpose of the Natural Science requirement in the University Studies program is to provide students with the tools to understand and be able to apply the methods by which scientific inquiry increases our understanding of the natural world. Courses must be selected from an approved list; departments normally included in the Natural Sciences are Biology, Chemistry, Geoscience, and Physics.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural sciences;

b. apply those methods to solve problems that arise in the natural sciences;

c. use inductive reasoning, mathematics, or statistics to solve problems in natural science;

d. engage in independent and collaborative learning;

e. identify, find, and use the tools of information science as it relates to natural science;

f. critically evaluate both source and content of scientific information; and

g. recognize and correct scientific misconceptions.

Courses that satisfy the laboratory requirement in the Natural Sciences will additionally provide students the opportunity to practice scientific inquiry through hands-on investigations and to analyze and report the results of those investigations.

 

4. Fine and Performing Arts (3 S.H.)

Courses in the Fine and Performing Arts area of the University Studies program offer opportunities for creative expression. These courses, which have a significant experiential/studio component, introduce the student to the creative process. They develop basic skills and aesthetic awareness in tandem with a fundamental understanding of artistic traditions and contemporary expressions. Courses must be selected from an approved list; departments normally included in the Fine and Performing Arts are Art, English, Music, and Theater and Dance.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. explore the language, skills, and materials of an artistic discipline;

b. use the methods of an arts practitioner to actively engage in creative processes or interpretive performances;

c. understand the cultural and gender contexts of artistic expression; and

d. engage in reflective analysis of their own art work or interpretive performance and respond to the works of others.

e. Unity and Diversity (12 S.H.)

It is understood that any academic program or department may explore Unity and Diversity and may propose courses to meet the requirements described below. It is further understood that the treatment of some of the issues described may require a higher level of understanding, and thus, these courses might be offered at any level and might require prerequisites.

 

1. Critical Analysis (3 S.H.)

Critical Analysis courses in the University Studies program are devoted to teaching critical thinking or analytic problem-solving skills. These skills include the ability to identify sound arguments and distinguish them from fallacious ones. The objective of these courses is to develop studentsí abilities to effectively use the process of critical analysis. Disciplinary examples should be selected to support the development of critical analysis skills.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. evaluate the validity and reliability of information;

b. analyze modes of thought, expressive works, arguments, explanations, or theories;

c. recognize possible inadequacies or biases in the evidence given to support arguments or conclusions; and

d. advance and support claims.

 

2. Science and Social Policy (3 S.H.)

The purpose of the Science and Social Policy requirement in the University Studies program is to promote studentsí understanding of the interrelated concerns of society and the sciences. These courses should integrate issues related to one of the sciences with the social and government policy decisions that stem from these issues. Issues might include the environment, genetic testing and mapping, applications of technology, etc. They should be treated from the perspective of the scientific foundations of the problem and address ethical, social, historical, and/or political implications of the issue.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. understand the scientific foundation of the topic;

b. understand the social, ethical, historical, and/or political implications;

c. understand and articulate the need to integrate issues of science with social policy;

d. evaluate the various policy options relevant to the social dilemmas posed by the science; and

e. articulate, choose among, and defend various policy and/or scientific options to cope with the challenges created.

 

3. Global OR Multicultural Perspectives (3 S.H.)

Global Perspectives

The purpose of the Global Perspectives requirement in University Studies is to improve studentsí understanding of the growing inter-relatedness of nations, people, and the environment, and to enhance studentsí ability to apply a comparative perspective to cross-cultural social, economic, political, spiritual, and environmental experiences. Courses that fulfill the global perspectives requirement must address at least two of the following outcomes.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. understand the role of the world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future;

b. describe and analyze social, economic, political, spiritual, or environmental elements that influence the relations between living beings and their environments or between societies; and/or

c. identify and analyze specific global issues, illustrating the social, economic, political, spiritual, or environmental differences that may affect their resolution.

 

OR

Multicultural Perspectives

The purpose of the Multicultural Perspectives requirement in University Studies is to develop students' understanding of diversity (gender, ethnicity, race, etc.) within and between societies. Courses in this area will help students employ a multicultural perspective for examining historical events; contemporary social, economic, and political issues; and artistic, literary, and philosophical expressions. Courses that fulfill the Multicultural Perspectives requirement must address at least three of the following outcomes.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures;

b.  understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences;

c. understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interactions between individuals and/or groups;

d. examine different cultures through their various expressions; and/or

e. possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different culture or cultural group.

 

4. Contemporary Citizenship OR Democratic Institutions (3 S.H.)

Contemporary Citizenship

The purpose of the Contemporary Citizenship requirement in University Studies is to provide students with the ability to participate as effective citizens in a democratic, multicultural, and global society. Courses in this area will focus on developing the skills and knowledge base to enhance students' ability to make effective decisions, pursue personal well-being, work collaboratively with others, and/or participate effectively in professional or civic responsibilities. Courses that fulfill the Contemporary Citizenship requirement must meet at least five of the following outcomes.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. use critical thinking to analyze contemporary issues;

b. demonstrate effective oral and/or written communication of ideas, informed opinions, and/or values;

c. identify, find, and use tools of information science related to contemporary issues;

d. demonstrate the ability to work effectively independently and/or in collaborative problem-solving groups;

e. identify principles and applications of personal, civic, and/or economic responsibility; understand personal responsibility for lifestyle choices; and/or

f. participate actively (e.g., class discussion, volunteerism, etc.) in issues significant to citizenship in contemporary society.

 

OR

Democratic Institutions

The purpose of the Democratic Institutions requirement in University Studies is to provide students with a basic understanding of concepts of social justice, the common good, and the legitimate scope of government in democratic and pluralistic society. The requirement should also enhance studentsí ability to participate in the free exchange of ideas and function as a public-minded citizen. Courses that fulfill the Democratic Institutions requirement must meet at least five of the following outcomes.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. understand the principles upon which democratic governments are based;

b. understand the problems of democracy and the conditions that favor or disfavor it;

c. identify, state, and justify value judgments related to democratic institutions;

d. understand the nature of non-democratic institutions;

e. understand the implications of taking responsibility for the consequences of their own actions for democratic institutions;

f. understand the relation of equal rights to democratic institutions; and/or

g. understand the need to exercise responsibility for the expression of their ideas.

 

2. Flag Requirements (12 S.H. of Flagged Coursework)

Flagged courses will normally be in the student's major or minor program. Departments will need to demonstrate to the University Studies Subcommittee that the courses in question merit the flags. All flagged courses must require the relevant basic skills course(s) as prerequisites (e.g., the "College Reading and Writing" Basic Skill course is a prerequisite for Writing Flag courses), although departments and programs may require additional prerequisites for flagged courses. The University Studies Subcommittee recognizes that it cannot veto department designation of flagged courses.

 

A. Writing Flag (6 S.H.)

The purpose of the Writing Flag requirement is to reinforce the outcomes specified for the basic skills area of writing. These courses are intended to provide contexts, opportunities, and feedback for students writing with discipline-specific texts, tools, and strategies. These courses should emphasize writing as essential to academic learning and intellectual development.

Courses can merit the Writing Flag by demonstrating that section enrollment will allow for clear guidance, criteria, and feedback for the writing assignments; that the course will require a significant amount of writing to be distributed throughout the semester; that writing will comprise a significant portion of the students' final course grade; and that students will have opportunities to incorporate readersí critiques of their writing.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields;

b. understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields;

c. adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields;

d. make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields; and

e. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

 

B. Oral Communication Flag (3 S.H.)

The purpose of the Oral Communication Flag requirement is to complete the process of providing graduates of Winona State University with the knowledge and experience required to enable them to become highly competent communicators by the time they graduate.

Courses can merit the Oral Communication Flag by demonstrating that they allow for clear guidance, criteria, and feedback for the speaking assignments; that the course requires a significant amount of speaking; that speaking assignments comprise a significant portion of the final course grade; and that students will have opportunities to obtain student and faculty critiques of their speaking.

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations;

b. understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines;

c. adapt their speaking to field-specific audiences;

d. receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement;

e. make use of the technologies used for research and speaking in the fields; and

f. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

C. Mathematics/Statistics OR Critical Analysis Flag (3 S.H.)

Students will be required to take either a math/statistics-intensive or a critical analysis flagged course. The outcomes for the two are listed separately below.

 Mathematics/Statistics Flag

The purpose of the Mathematics/Statistics Flag course requirement is to reinforce the outcomes specified for the basic skills area of mathematics/statistics. These courses are intended to provide students with significant practice in applying prerequisite mathematical or statistical knowledge.

Courses can merit the Mathematics/Statistics Flag if students will be required to make essential use throughout the semester of mathematical or statistical models appropriate to their prerequisite knowledge of those areas, and if the correct use of techniques based on such models will comprise a significant portion of a student's final grade. It is understood that mere rote computations, algebraic manipulations, or graphical design without inferential content would not merit a Mathematics/Statistics Flag.

 

 These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. practice the correct application of mathematical or statistical models that are appropriate to their prerequisite knowledge of those areas; and

b. make proper use of modern mathematical or statistical methods appropriate to their level of prerequisite knowledge, to include, if statistics is used in a substantive way, the use of a statistical package with graphics capability when appropriate.

 

OR

Critical Analysis Flag

The purpose of the Critical Analysis Flag course requirement is to provide an alternative to the M/S Flag requirement for students majoring in fields that do not make significant use of mathematics or statistics. C-flagged courses are intended to provide students with significant practice in rigorous argument comparable to what a student is expected to receive in a Mathematics/Statistics-flagged course.

Courses can merit the Critical Analysis Flag if students will be required to make essential use throughout the semester of proper techniques for analyzing the structure and validity of arguments, as opposed to techniques for examining the factual validity of, or the psychological or socioeconomic bases for, the premises of an argument; and if a significant part of their grade will depend on the proper use of such techniques.

 

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. recognize and evaluate appropriate evidence to advance a claim;

b. apply critical analytical skills in making decisions or in advancing a theoretical position; and

c. evaluate alternative arguments, decision strategies, or theories within a systematic framework.

 

approved by A2C2, 04/12/2000

approved by Faculty Senate, 5/8/2000

Last Modified May 3, 2001 1:00 PM

Modified on September 25, 2002 by Charla Miertschin, A2C2 chair, to reflect changes to IV. Course Approval Process as per FA Senate approval on October 1, 2001.