Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

 

Course Syllabus

College of Business

Winona State University

 

Department: Administrative Information Systems Revision Date: June 2000

Course Number: AIS 402 Course Title: Basic Business Teaching Methods

Credit: 1 semester hour Frequency of Offering: Yearly

Prerequisites: Education 305 and 312 Grading: Grade Only

 

  1. COURSE DESCRIPTION
  1. Catalog Description and Focus
  2. A course for business teacher preparation in the methods and materials of basic business education. Focuses on the refinement of teaching abilities and competencies required in the teaching of business law, consumer education, general business, entrepreneurship, economics

    and career exploration. Open only to AIS Department majors and minors.

  3. Oral Flag

The General Methods course provides numerous opportunities for pre-service educators to practice oral presentations within the context of educational tools and strategies related to education for and about business. The course emphasizes oral presentations as required for successful performance in educational settings. The course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to

    1. earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations;
    2. understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines;
    3. adapt their speaking to field-specific audiences;
    4. receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement;
    5. make use of the technologies used for research and speaking in the fields; and
    6. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage and documentation in their fields.
  1. Course Objectives

Each student will

    1. Apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive
    2. development of preadolescents and adolescents.

    3. Apply the research base for and the best practices of middle level and high school basic business education.
    4. Apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of basic business education.
    5. Apply evaluative criteria for a basic business curriculum and a plan for continuous improvement.
    6. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with middle level and high school basic business students within
    7. a range of educational programming models.

    8. Select basic business course content based on the needs, interests, and abilities of students.
    9. Evaluate and select the most appropriate instructional and supplementary materials for students in basic business courses.
    10. Plan and organize course content through daily, unit, and semester course plans.
    11. Confidently teach basic business content through participation in micro-teaching activities.
    12. Exemplify a growing sense of professionalism necessary to become and effective basic business teacher.
  1. Course Outline
    1. Overview: Basic Business Education
    1. Goals, objectives, and content for basic business courses
    2. Basic business education as general education
    3. Basic business education as vocational education
    4. Philosophical issues
    5. Incorporating business ethics into basic business coursework
    6. Research: current trends in middle and high school curriculums
    7. Research sources: basic business methods and materials
    1. Overview: Prevocational Business/Career Exploration
    1. Goals and objectives of career exploration
    2. Career education models
    3. Career education concepts
    4. Career development program planning: scope and sequence
    5. Implementing and evaluating career exploration
    6. Evaluation of materials
    7. Student evaluation
    1. The Instructional Program in Basic Business
    1. Planning for instruction
    2. Motivation
    3. Reading
    4. Individualization
    5. Developing thinking skills
    6. Developing understandings and attitudes
    1. Instructional Strategies for Basic Business
    1. Classroom questioning
    2. Learning activity packages
    3. Instructional activities
    1. Evaluation in Basic Business
    1. Curriculum evaluation criteria and assessment
    2. Using assessment data for continuous curriculum improvement
    3. Evaluation of student achievement
    4. Course evaluation

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING PRINCIPLES

The following seven principles of good practice provide general guidelines for the design of this course and for class participation; your learning experience will encourage:

  1. Time on task. d. High, attainable expectations. g. Respect for diverse talents and
  2. Active learning e. Faculty-student contact ways of learning.

c. Prompt feedback f. Cooperative, collaborative learning.

 

  1. APPLICATIONS AND ACTIVITIES
  1. Course Portfolio – Compile a course portfolio including all written assignments, article reviews, reaction papers, self-initiated coursework, readings handouts, and other activities as assigned. Prepare to discuss the portfolio in class. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)
  2. Curriculum Proposal – As a high school department chairperson, you are responsible for outlining

a plan for selecting appropriate basic business courses to be offered at your high school. Explain your proposal during class.

    1. Briefly describe a high school of your choice as to location, size, employment community, description of student population and extent of business program.
    2. List the business courses you would recommend for the high school you describe. Give the duration of each course and the recommended grade level(s). Describe the prerequisites, if any, for each course as well as the rationale for the prerequisites. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)
  1. Current Curriculum Research – Using your copy of the MN Business Education Curriculum Survey (completed summer 2000), analyze the basic business curriculums in MN high schools and middle schools. Prepare a summary of the findings and critique these curricula in terms of current professional thinking and recommendations on what should be offered. Include a concluding statement on your reaction to the research findings. Offer an oral presentation in class. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)
  2. Student Differences – Select one topic from any basic business course and outline your plan for
  3. providing for student differences. Be specific; use any resources you wish. Prepare to present the information during class.(a, b, c, d, e, f.)

  4. Levels of Learning and Higher Order Thinking Skills - Begin a collection of activities and instructional strategies for developing thinking skills. Refer to issues of the Delta Pi Epsilon Instructional Strategies, Applied Research Series as well as the NBEA KEYING IN series for ideas. Be prepared to share at least one of the activities/ideas with the class. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)
  5. Motivational Technique – Select a basic business course and a topic; prepare an introductory lesson designed to stimulate student interest in the subject matter. Prepare a micro-demonstration implementing the motivational technique. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)
  6. Learning Activity Package – Select a basic business course topic and begin the construction of a module or learning activity (graduation standard) package. Team with another student to have him/her review your package. You may choose the same topic as you did for activity 6. Present the module in class. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)
  7. Evaluation Plan – Identify a basic business topic and outline an evaluation plan for assessing student progress. Use any sources of your choice. Prepare to present the plan in class for discussion. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)
  8. Community Resources – For a basic business topic of your choice, obtain three different types of community resources that could be used in teaching the topic. Prepare to demonstrate during class how you would use the community resources in teaching the topic. Evaluate the community resources according to the criteria checklist furnished. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)
  9. Career Education – Write a brief proposal for your administration on the purposes of and justification for career education at the middle school level. Then list the objectives you consider appropriate for your school system. Outline the topics, in an organizational plan of your choice, for the career exploration course. Prepare or describe at least one activity for each area of emphasis in the course. (Minimum of five total activities; activities should be related to all topic areas.) Present your proposal in class. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)
  10. Teaching Demonstration – Choose an instructional unit for a basic business course you would like to teach. Prepare a 30- to 45-minute teaching demonstration on a topic within the unit. Prepare a unit plan and a complete lesson plan for the demonstration using at least two different teaching methodologies and a minimum of one motivational technique to get students involved in the topic. Videotape the demonstration according to the Teaching Demonstration Guidelines given to you for your teaching demonstrations in methods of teaching courses. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)
  11. Classroom Observation – Prepare a critique of a basic business class (middle or high school) that you observed. Present your observations during class. (a, b, c, d, e, f.)

 

  1. EVALUATION

Course evaluation will be based on the following: Grading Scale

  1. Mid-term and final exam. (20%)
  2. Micro-demonstrations. (30%) 92% = A
  3. Teaching demonstration. (20%) 86% = B
  4. Course portfolio breadth and depth. (10%) 75% = C
  5. Classroom observation and critique 70% = D
  6. of a basic business class (middle or high school). (10%)

  7. Class participation and professionalism. (10%)

General Policies. Assignments for excused absences are due the class period after returning to class. Confer with the instructor before missing class. Arrange makeup assignments.

Additional readings or projects may be assigned. Since in-class participation is an integral portion of this course, students are expected to be present with the exception of illness, a university-related activity, or family emergency.

Keyboard assignments and prepare back-up copies. Assignments submitted by the timelines accrue full credit. For WSU ethics policies and procedures, read http://www.winona.edu/studentaffairs.

Accommodation Statement. Any student who has a personal issue that may prevent full demonstration of ability should speak with the professor personally before the end of the first week of classes. Necessary accommodations may be arranged to ensure full participation and facilitate individual educational opportunities.

 

  1. TEXTBOOKS AND RESOURCES

Textbooks

Brown, Betty J., MANAGEMENT OF THE BUSINESS CLASSROOM, National Business Education

Association, 2001. (Selected chapters.)

Calhoun, Calfrey C. and Bettye Robinson, MANAGING THE LEARNING PROCESS IN BUSINESS

EDUCATION, Chapters 14 and 15, Colonial Press, 1995.

Perreault, Heidi R. CLASSROOM STRATEGIES: THE METHODOLOGY OF BUSINESS

EDUCATION, Chapter 18, National Business Education Association, 1996.

KEYING IN, National Business Education Association newsletterr series.

 

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES: AN APPLIED RESEARCH SERIES, Delta Pi Epsilon.

 

Professional Journals

Business Education Forum.

The Delta Pi Epsilon Journal.

International Review for Business Education.

Journal of Education for Business.

NABTE Review.

Technological Horizons in Education (T. H.E.) Journal

 

Web Sites

Balance Sheet http://www.swep.com/bused/news/indexframe.html

Business Education in General http://www.thomsonlearning.com/

Children, Family, and Learning (CFL) http://cfl.state.mn.us

Educate America (with Educational Links) http://www.educateamerica.com/

Goals 2000 Act http://www.ed.gov.legislation/BOAL2000/TheAct/index.html

Graduation Standards http://cfl.state.mn.us/GRAD

Interactive Multimedia Electronic Journal

Of Computer-enhanced Learning http://imej.wfu.edu/

Keyboarding http://www.swep.com/keyboarding/index.html

Minnesota Business Educators Incorporated www.bears.byron.k12.mn.us/mbei/mbei1.htm

Minnesota Department of Economic Security http://www.des.state.mn.us/

Minnesota Electronic Curriculum Repository http://mecr.state.mn.us/home

Minnesota School to Work http://cfl.state.mn.us/stw/index.html

MN Technology Education Association http://www.anoka.k12.mn.us/mtea.html

NBEA Online (Yearbooks) http://www.nbea.org/nbea.html

North Star http://www.state.mn.us

Teaching Business Education—A Creative

Ideas, Tips, and Techniques Newsletter

For Business Educators http://www.teachbused.com/mainframe.htm

 

 

AIS 402 TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE AND ASSIGNMENTS

 

01. Reading Assignments: Brown, Chapters 2, 3, and 5; Calhoun, Chapters 14 and 15; and (10/23)

Perreault, Chapter 18. For each of the following assignments, prepare to share with the class:

  1. Curriculum Proposal – As a high school department chair, you are responsible for outlining a (10/30)

plan for selecting appropriate basic business courses to be offered at your high school.

    1. Briefly describe a high school of your choice as to location, size, employment
    2. community, description of student population and extent of business program.

    3. List the business courses you would recommend for the high school you describe.

Give the duration of each course and the recommended grade level(s). Describe

the prerequisites, if any, for each course as well as the rationale for the prerequisites.

  1. Current Curriculum Research – Using your copy of the MN Business Education (11/06)
  2. Curriculum Survey (completed summer 2000), analyze the basic business curriculums

    in MN high schools and middle schools. Write a summary of the findings and critique

    these curriculums in terms of current professional thinking and recommendations on what

    should be offered. Write a concluding statement on your reaction to the research findings.

  3. Student Differences – Select one topic from any basic business course and outline your (11/13)
  4. plan for providing for student differences. Be specific; use any resources you wish.

  5. Levels of Learning and Higher Order Thinking Skills - Begin a collection of activities (11/13)
  6. and instructional strategies for developing thinking skills. Refer to issues of the Delta

    Pi Epsilon Instructional Strategies, Applied Research Series as well as the NBEA KEYING

    IN series for ideas. Be prepared to share at least one of the activities/ideas with the class.

  7. Motivational Technique – Select a basic business course and a topic; prepare an introductory (11/13)
  8. lesson designed to stimulate student interest in the subject matter. Be prepared to do a micro-

    demonstration implementing the motivational technique.

  9. Learning Activity Package – Select a basic business course topic and begin the construction (11/20)
  10. of a module or learning activity package. Team with another student to have him/her review

    your package. You may choose the same topic as you did for activity 6.

  11. Evaluation Plan – Identify a basic business topic and outline an evaluation plan for assessing (11/20)
  12. student progress. Use any sources of your choice.

  13. Community Resources – For a basic business topic of your choice, obtain three different types (11/27)
  14. of community resources that could be used in teaching the topic. Prepare to demonstrate how

    you would use the community resources in teaching the topic. Evaluate the community

    resources according to the criteria checklist furnished.

  15. Career Education – Write a brief proposed for your administration on the purpose and (11/27)
  16. justification of career education at the middle school level. Then list the objectives you

    consider appropriate for your school system. Outline the topics, in an organizational plan of

    your choice, for the career exploration course. Prepare or describe at least one activity for

    each area of emphasis in the course. (Minimum of five total activities; activities should be

    related to all topic areas.)

  17. Teaching Demonstration – Chose a unit of instruction in a basic business course you would (12/04-11)
  18. like to teach. Prepare a 30- to 45-minute teaching demonstration on a topic within the unit.

    Prepare a unit plan and a complete lesson plan for the demonstration using at least two

    different teaching methodologies and a minimum of one motivational technique to get students

    involved in the topic. Videotape the demonstration according to the Teaching Demonstration

    Guidelines given to you for your teaching demos in your four business teaching methods courses.

  19. Course Portfolio – Compile a course portfolio including all written assignments, article reviews, (12/11)

reaction papers, self-initiated coursework, readings handouts, and other activities as assigned.

University Studies Course Proposal

 

 

Department or Program: Administrative Information Systems Department

Course Numbers: 401/402

Semester Hours: 3 (401 = 2 S.H. and 402 = 1 S.H.)

Frequency of Offering: Yearly

Course Titles: 401 - General Methods and

402 - Basic Business Teaching Methods

Catalog Descriptions: 401. A course for business teacher preparation in the methods and materials of

business education. Topics include philosophical foundations of business education, general curriculum trends, and instructional design. Open only to AIS Department teaching majors. Recommended prerequisites: Education 305 and 312.

402. A course for business teacher preparation in the methods and materials of basic business education. Focuses on the refinement of teaching abilities and competencies required in the teaching of business law, consumer education, general business, entrepreneurship, economics and career exploration. Open only to AIS Department majors and minors.

These are existing

courses previously

approved by A2C2: Yes

These are new course

proposals: No

Department Contact

Person: Jeanette A. Karjala jkarjala@winona.edu

University Studies

Approval is requested in: Oral Flag

 

AIS 401 and 402 combined meet the oral flag requirement.

Attachment: Although each faculty member is responsible for his or her course syllabus, the

attached syllabi include outlines of the course content and requirements. Items meeting the Oral Flag requirements are identified by corresponding letters matching the listed outcomes--a, b, c, d, e, and/or f.

Below each of the six outcomes under the "Oral Flag" requirement are listed the course requirements, content, learning activities, and documentation relevant to the outcomes that promote students’ abilities to:

  1. Earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations. The General Methods and the Basic Business Teaching Methods courses focus on informal and formal oral presentations. Students study the concepts and theories of teaching students in the business content areas. They work toward developing their presentation skills for their personal and professional lives. They develop their abilities to apply oral communication skills through presentations to peers as equals, to peers acting as K-12 students in teaching demonstrations, to peers acting as administrators or parents, and to the class as a whole in more formal settings. Students have opportunities to practice presenting their analyses of concepts and plans for curriculum through applications involving real-life, objective cases described in textbooks, handouts, or videotapes.
  2. Understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines. Students have numerous opportunities to work collaboratively on certain projects and in discussion- and case-based groups during class. Students present oral as well as keyboarded reports about topics that enhance the development of teaching knowledge and skills. Through discussions concerning business education teaching practices and theories, students enhance their abilities to apply teaching concepts and theories.
  3. Adapt their speaking to field-specific audiences. Students participate actively within group and class discussions as well as in collaborative groups that evaluated research in business education. Students use decision making steps and other frameworks and models for preparing lesson plans, unit plans, business education curriculum, micro-teaching demonstrations, teacher-student-parent-administrator role play, and motivational techniques.
  4. Receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement. Students receive feedback from the professor and peers on all oral presentations during the courses. They have access to information sources through the library, web sites, and resource people. Students have opportunities to learn about speaking to and with students, faculty as peers, parents, administrators, and community people. Presentations account for 50 to 80 percent of the final grades.

e. Make use of the technologies used for research and speaking in the fields. As indicated on the

syllabus, students participate during each class session in discussion groups. In addition, they have opportunities to present to the entire class—motivational technique, micro-teaching demonstrations, and role plays. They practice the techniques that will enhance their speaking skills for dealing with students, faculty peers, administrators, parents, and the community at large. They use technology for seeking information, as listed at the end of each syllabus. Furthermore, students use spreadsheets, databases, word processing, power point, and the smart board for their presentations.

  1. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields. Since all the students have taken a business communications course and end-user technology courses such as word processing, spreadsheets, databases, power point, and desktop publishing, they have ample background for the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in business education. They prepare keyboarded reports that support their oral presentations.