Approved by Faculty Senate

University Studies Proposal: Arts and Sciences Core

FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS: ART 128 Introduction to Sculpture

The course develops students’ perceptual, creative, technical, and problem-solving skills in a sculptural context. Elements and principles of design are identified and employed. Aesthetic judgment and good studio practice are cultivated.

Students will:

  1. Explore the language, skills and materials of visual art
  2. A series of projects are assigned which are completed during class and outside of class. Class critiques of finished work are an integral part of each project. Students are introduced to several traditional permanent sculptural materials (selected from clay, plaster, wood, stone, hot or cold metal) and techniques (selected from modeling, mold-making, casting, fabricating, carving, assemblage, ceramic process).

    Projects address the elements and principles of sculpture as outlined below. Consideration is also given to concept, craftsmanship, originality, and expression. This is essentially a problem-solving class — there are many possible solutions to any given problem. A major objective of the class is that the participants learn the vocabulary of sculpture and employ that vocabulary during class critiques.

  3. use art studio methods to actively engage in the creative process

Students:

1. Learn selected basic world histories of sculpture and become aware of some contemporary sculptural ideas.

  1. Learn some basic concepts of sculpture.

3. Explore a range of basic studio creative processes.

4. Learn the technical application of a variety of tools, equipment and materials.

5. Develop perceptual skills through analyzing and identifying visual components.

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of and skills with visual elements and principles through projects and oral and written communication
  2. Develop understanding of the relationship between form and content in sculpture.

 

  1. understand the cultural and gender contexts of artistic expression

Instruction in Sculpture is based on the contemporary Western approach to studio practice and artistic expression. However, students are introduced sculpture of the past and of other cultures, including examples by women artists, past and present, of the West and elsewhere. Students learn from slide images, textbook reproductions and readings, and through their oral reports. They respond to cultural and gender questions in their journals and through subsequent class discussion.

 

e. engage in reflective analysis of their own work and respond to the work of others

Students analyze their own work and the work of other students through critiques written in journals and subsequent classroom critique discussion. Students analyze the work of professional artists through class discussion and the writing of a paper critiquing a current exhibition or performance.

 

 

 

Intro to Sculpture (Art 128)

Prof. Anne S. Plummer

CREDITS: 3 PREREQUISITES: None FREQUENCY OF OFFERING: Every fall GRADING TYPE: P/NC Option non-majors APPLICATION: A course designed for non-art majors introducing students to some of the basic techniques in sculpture and application of elements and principles of design. This course fulfills 3 credits of the Arts and Sciences Core Requirements in the Fine and Performing Arts area of the University Studies Program

COURSE SYLLABUS

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

An introduction to basic sculpture techniques. No prerequisite. P/NC Option non-majors.

MAJOR FOCUS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE:

The course develops students’ perceptual, creative, technical, and problem-solving skills in a sculptural context. Elements and principles of design are identified and employed. Aesthetic judgment and good studio practice are cultivated.

The following objectives address the learning outcomes for Fine and Performing Arts courses in the University Studies program:

Students will:

  1. Explore the language, skills and materials of visual art
  2. A series of projects are assigned which are completed during class and outside of class. Class critiques of finished work are an integral part of each project. Students are introduced to several traditional permanent sculptural materials (selected from clay, plaster, wood, stone, hot or cold metal) and techniques (selected from modeling, mold-making, casting, fabricating, carving, assemblage, ceramic process).

    Projects address the elements and principles of sculpture as outlined below. Consideration is also given to concept, craftsmanship, originality, and expression. This is essentially a problem-solving class — there are many possible solutions to any given problem. A major objective of the class is that the participants learn the vocabulary of sculpture and employ that vocabulary during class critiques.

  3. use art studio methods to actively engage in the creative process

 

Students:

1. Learn selected basic world histories of sculpture and become aware of some contemporary sculptural ideas.

  1. Learn some basic concepts of sculpture.

3. Explore a range of basic studio creative processes.

4. Learn the technical application of a variety of tools, equipment and materials.

5. Develop perceptual skills through analyzing and identifying visual components.

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of and skills with visual elements and principles through projects and oral and written communication
  1. Develop understanding of the relationship between form and content in sculpture.

 

 

  1. understand the cultural and gender contexts of artistic expression
  2. Instruction in Sculpture is based on the contemporary Western approach to studio practice and artistic expression. However, students are introduced sculpture of the past and of other cultures, including examples by women artists, past and present, of the West and elsewhere. Students learn from slide images, textbook reproductions and readings, and through their oral reports. They respond to cultural and gender questions in their journals and through subsequent class discussion.

  3. engage in reflective analysis of their own work and respond to the work of others

 

Students analyze their own work and the work of other students through critiques written in journals and subsequent classroom critique discussion. Students analyze the work of professional artists through class discussion and the writing of a paper critiquing a current exhibition or performance.

 

COURSE OUTLINE:

A. Introduction and Course Overview

1. Purpose, scope and sequence, competencies and expectancies

2. Discussion of perception and observation

3. Historical and contemporary materials, techniques, styles, and functions

4. Examples and illustrations (artworks)

B. Tools and Materials

1. Hand tools, power tools and equipment

2. Temporary materials and permanent materials

3. Techniques

C. Creative Processes

1. Nature and abstraction

2. Imitation and expression

3. Function

4. Problem-solving

5. Pre-conceived outcomes

6. Influence of process and material

7. Artist as craftsman and artisan

D. Elements

1. Mass, shape, and form

2. Space (including negative space)

3. Planes and surfaces

4. Line and silhouette

5. Texture

6. Light

7. Color

8. Gravity

9. Time

E. Principles

1. Proportion

2. Balance

3. Movement

4. Rhythm and repetition

5. Emphasis and dominance

6. Function

7. Variety

8. Size and scale

F. Criticism and Analysis

1. Individual and group critiques

2. Verbal and written analysis

3. Relationship of form and content

BASIC INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN AND METHODS UTILIZED:

Introductory instruction is through lecture, slide lecture, demonstration, assigned reading, and assigned visual study (gallery or museum viewing). Primary mode of instruction is through studio practice — manipulation of tools and materials, to provide sculptural solutions to problems. Peer consultation, individual critique, group critique, sketches, journal writing, and short essay enable students to assess and evaluate their work.

We are a community of learners in this class. Co-operation and exchange of ideas among us all is encouraged. The completion of many projects is enhanced through co-operation.

Studio safety is emphasized. Learn to use tools properly. Use appropriate safety equipment (masks, gloves, asbestos suit, headgear, guards, pushsticks). Keep your work area clean and organized and be aware of what others are doing around you. Become familiar with equipment before using it. After working, replace all tools, clean your area, and store your projects (in your locker or studio 212).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

A. Completion of all assigned projects

B. Participation in group and individual critiques

C. Sketches, journal writing, and oral reports.

D. Consistent class attendance.

METHODS OF EVALUATION:

A. PROJECTS: Satisfactory completion of projects and their requirements in time for class critiques.

B. PROJECTS: Originality, appropriate craftsmanship, content, and dynamic visual impact of solutions.

C. PARTICIPATION IN CRITIQUES Quality and quantity of participation in individual and group critiques.

D. PERFORMANCE IN SKETCHBOOK/JOURNAL, AND ORAL REPORTS.

 

SKETCHBOOKS/JOURNALS are reviewed at midterm and final times, and throughout the semester. Use your sketchbook to record information from exhibitions, slides, lectures in class, oral reports, sculptural forms you see around you, your projects, and other students’ projects. Journalize after each class on what you experienced and/or learned. Use your journal to outline reading assignments.

 

ORAL REPORTS based on library research in conjunction with a project are presented several times throughout the semester.

E. CONSISTENT CLASS ATTENDANCE Attendance to each entire class is essential to understand projects, see demonstrations, view slides, take advantage of work time, participate in class discussions, and get my help with your projects. Expect to work outside of class as well. Bring written proof of legitimate absence (i.e. a note from your doctor or the campus health service). More than three unexcused absences may result in a lowered grade. You are responsible for learning the information presented in class from other students or from the instructor during office hours.

F. OBSERVANCE OF SAFETY AND CLEAN-UP PRACTICES Be sure you know how to use tools properly and use the appropriate safety equipment. Allow time for returning tools, cleaning up debris, and storing work in progress. A different team of two people will have a clean-up assignment after each class. Sign up for your days (three times during the semester) and get your assignment from the instructor that day.

TEXTBOOK

Zelanski, Fisher. Shaping Space: The Dynamics of three-Dimensional Design

Five copies of this book are on reserve at the WSU library. Several copies are available at the bookstore for purchase. You might consider sharing the purchase of the book with a classmate.

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

sketchbook/journal - loose-leaf 8 1/2" x 11" binder that includes both lined and unlined paper.

appropriate clothing and shoes

lock for locker (Bookstore)

utility knife (Tri-mac at 1 Washington St. or Daniel’s Ace Hardware at Huff and 2nd Sts.)

tape measure (6' or 8') (same as above)

hardware etc. as needed

 

Optional:

personal dust mask; apron or smock

OFFICE HOURS Monday — Thursday: 1:30 — 2:45 pm, and by appointment

I will either be in the Art office (204D), or in the studio (109 or 212.) You may also talk to me during class after any group activities, or you may make an appointment to see me at some other time. If you have any questions not answered in class or are experiencing any difficulties, be sure to talk to me about it as soon as possible.

E-MAIL and Phone aplummer@winona.edu PH 457-5393

Please use e-mail or the telephone (with voicemail) to ask questions, notify me of an emergency absence, set up an office appointment time, etc.

STUDIO HOURS The building and 109 and 212 studios are open to students taking classes in sculpture, ceramics and 3-D:

Mon.- Thu 7:30 am — 9:00 pm

Fri 7:30 am — 5:00 pm

Sat 10:00 am — 4:00 pm

Sun 12:00 noon — 4:00 pm

If you are in the building when it is locked by Security, you may stay as long as you like. However, you cannot then leave and re-enter. The building is closed over breaks and holidays.

LOCKERS Use tape to label a locker downstairs with your name and the semester (Fall 00.) Store your backpack, coat or jacket, tools, materials, special clothing, and small work in progress there.

GENERAL STUDIO GUIDELINES During class and outside of class, replace all tools and materials after using them, and sweep up your debris. Store works-in-progress in studio 212. After critiques, some pieces may be displayed or photographed by the instructor. Unless otherwise instructed, before the next class following a critique, remove your work by taking it home, recycling it in an appropriate manner, or breaking it down into compact components and discarding it in the dumpster. You are responsible for the timely removal of all your work in this manner. No finished pieces can be stored in the studios after critiques.