Approved by Faculty Senate

University Studies Course Proposal: Arts And Sciences Core

HUMANITIES: ART 222 Art History II

Requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to

a. Identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of Art History as a Humanistic discipline:

ART 222 is is designed as a broad survey of the History of Western Art. It begins with the Renaissance and concludes with the outbreak of World War II. It is aimed at the BA student majoring in Art but open to the interested general student as well.

The class extends the knowledge base of the History of Art gained in ART 221 to further the student's understanding of

1. art as a non-verbal means of communication (as a language of visual forms having its own vocabulary and structure);

2. the role of iconography in establishing the content of works of art;

3. the interaction among a work's iconography and its visual style;

4. the concept of style and attendant iconographies as a means of measuring art-historical changes across time and space among those cultures and areas under investigation;

hence students must be able

5. to identify period styles and works of individual artists and their styles

b. Understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations:

Students learn via lectures, videos, and their reading assignments, of the means by which these factors affect the creation of art: how the visual arts serve as both individual and cultural expression informed by religious, political, social, and economic conditions, as well as artistic traditions; how the artist perceives and processes the world in a given time and place; the circumstances of patronage and audience response, of politics, art politics, and economics; the social purposes of a given work; the intentions of the artist; the impact of prevailing and changing art theories, etc.

More specifically students in ART 222 are expected to demonstrate their understanding of

1. the tension, during the Renaissance period, between the Humanistic appeal of Classical civilization and the traditional beliefs of Christianity;

2. the relationship between Renaissance Humanism and the creation of a rationalist art of space and volume;

3. the transformation of Renaissance forms during the Baroque era;

4. the correlation between the national varieties of the Baroque and Protestant and Roman Catholic values;

5. the role of women and women artists during the entire period;

6. the revivalist nature of Romantic art in relation to the era's political and industrial revolutions;

7. the nature of the avant-garde and the changing relationship of the artist to society; and

8. the stylistic innovations and radical changes, including abstraction, in modernist art as a consequence (variously) of formal evolution, non-Western influences, and the urban-industrial character of modern life.

Performance in examinations, which include essay material, determine the degree to which students have been able to identify and understand this fundamental basis of art-historical studies.

c. Understand the role of critical analysis in interpreting and evaluating works of art:

Iconographic and formal analyses of works of art in class and in the text, reading assignments, study guides, and examination reviews enable the student in ART 222 to

1. develop critical and analytical skills in evaluating works of art,


and to employ

2. such factual information as the broad purposes and functions of specific modes of art, the techniques employed, and general chronologies and dating of style periods and individual works

so as to

3. discern differences and recognize similarities between styles (artists' styles and period styles) and articulate them in well written essays

Examination essay questions using slides of works of art measure how well the student has grasped both the role and mechanisms of art-critical analysis.

 

 

Art 222 Art History II Syllabus

This course fulfills 3 credits of the Arts and Sciences Core Requirement in the Humanities area of the University Studies Program.

COURSE OBJECTIVES AND CONTENT

The following objectives address the learning outcomes for Humanities' courses in the University Studies Program:

A. Identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of Art History as a Humanistic discipline:

ART 222 is designed as a broad survey of the History of Western Art. It begins with the Renaissance and continues until World War II. It is aimed at the BA student majoring in Art but open to the interested general student as well.

The class extends the knowledge base of the History of Art gained in ART 221 to further the student's understanding of

1. art as a non-verbal means of communication (as a language of visual forms having its own vocabulary and structure);

2. the role of iconography in establishing the content of works of art;

3. the interaction among a work's iconography and its visual style;

4. the concept of style and attendant iconographies as a means of measuring art-historical changes across time and space among those cultures and areas under investigation;

hence students must be able

5. to identify period styles and works of individual artists and their styles

B. Understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations:

Students learn via lectures, videos, and their reading assignments, of the means by which these factors fundamentally affect the creation of art: how the visual arts serve as both individual and cultural expression informed by religious, political, social, and economic conditions, as well as artistic traditions; how the artist perceives and processes the world in a given time and place; the circumstances of patronage and audience response, of politics, art politics, and economics; the social purposes of a given work; the intentions of the artist; the impact of prevailing and changing art theories, etc.

More specifically students in ART 222 are expected to demonstrate their understanding of

1. the tension, during the Renaissance period, between the Humanistic appeal of Classical civilization and the traditional beliefs of Christianity;

2. the relationship between Renaissance Humanism and the creation of a rationalist art of space and volume;

3. the transformation of Renaissance forms during the Baroque era;

4. the correlation between the national varieties of the Baroque and Protestant and Roman Catholic values;

5. the role of women and women artists during the entire period;

6. the revivalist nature of Romantic art in relation to the era's political and industrial revolutions;

7. the nature of the avant-garde and the changing relationship of the artist to society; and

8. the stylistic innovations and radical changes, including abstraction, in modernist art as a consequence (variously) of formal evolution, non-Western influences, and the urban-industrial character of modern life.

Performance in examinations, which include essay material, determine the degree to which students have been able to identify and understand this fundamental basis art-historical studies.

C. Understand the role of critical analysis in interpreting and evaluating works of art:

Iconographic and formal analyses of works of art in class and in the text, reading assignments, study guides, and examination reviews enable the student in ART 222 to

1. develop critical and analytical skills in evaluating works of art,

and to employ

2. such factual information as the broad purposes and functions of specific modes of art, the techniques employed, and general chronologies and dating of style periods and individual works

so as to

3. discern differences and recognize similarities between styles (artists' styles and period styles) and articulate them in well written essays

Examination essay questions using slides of works of art measure how well the student has grasped both the role and mechanisms of art-critical analysis.

 

TEXTBOOK

Laurie Schneider Adams, A History of Western Art, New York: McGraw-Hill, 2nd ed., 1997

WEB SITE: www.mhhe.com/socscience/art/adams_3_WA/

 

 

You will also need to purchase for about $3.00 a set of individual reproductions of works from the late 19th and 20th centuries not published in the text, but which will be included in class and for which you will be responsible. These are available from the bookstore.

COURSE FORMAT

 

Lectures and occasional videos. Class discussion is encouraged and questions are always welcome.

 

REQUIREMENTS

 

Three exams including the final. Final exam is not cumulative.

 

 

EXAMS

 

Will consist of all or some of the following: (For specifics of each exam, see next page.)

 

A. Non-visual questions such as multiple choice, eliminations, and matching. Of a more or less factual nature; drawn from text and lectures.

B. Slide identifications: styles/periods, countries or cultural regions, subject matter, rough dating. All slides drawn from the text.

C. Slide identifications: artists; from the text. You are responsible for ALL works reproduced in the text by artists covered in class.

D. Essay question based on slides involving matters of style, meaning or interpretation, art-historical or cultural significance, etc.; of a comparative nature. Graded separately.

 

NOTE: For each exam bring a Scan-Tron Form 882 and a #2 pencil. Also, seating will be alphabetical during exams.

No Make-up Exams Given. If you have a legitimate reason for missing an exam, I may excuse you from the test, but this means your other marks will be weighted more heavily (see "Grading"). Each case considered on an individual basis.

GRADING

Each of the three exams in worth 20%; each of the two essay questions 15%; and attendance 10%.

 

ATTENDANCE

Roll will be taken each class day. Attendance grades will be given as follows:

A: 0-2 absences B: 3 absences C: 4 absences D: 5 absences F: 6+ absences

COURSE SCHEDULE

The topics that follow embrace those activities and requirements, as stated on page 1, expected of Humanities courses in the University Studies Program. Such activities and requirements promote the abilities of ART 109 students to

A. Identify and understand the specific elements and assumptions of Art as a Humanistic discipline.

B. Understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations.

C. Understand the role of critical analysis in interpreting and evaluating works of art.

A reminder: always keep up with the assigned readings, and otherwise be prepared for the day’s lecture. As you read, pay close attention to the illustrations being discussed, and study carefully the maps, timelines, and architectural diagrams and plans. Consult the glossary in the back of the text for definitions of unfamiliar art and technical terms. The various "boxed" sections in the text will further enhance your understanding of the material. If necessary read or review chapter one.

Be aware that not all the artists/works included in the assigned chapters will be covered in class: you will not be responsible for the omitted material. On the other hand, you are responsible for the purchased reproductions mention above (see TEXTBOOK). Occasionally slides of works of art will be introduced in class that are neither reproduced nor discussed in your text: again, you are not responsible for these but do remember why they are brought into the class discussions.

Week Chapter

 

 

1 Introduction: The Precursors of the Renaissance Review 14

in Italy and Flanders (not exam material)

1-2 15th Century: The Early Renaissance in Italy and Flanders 15

Florence to c. 1440; Flanders to 1476

Florence and Venice: 1440 to 1500

3-4 16th Century: The High Renaissance in Italy 16

Florence and Rome; Venice

 

5 EXAM I: A, B, C Questions (date to be announced)

Essay: D Question

 

6 16th Century in Italy continued: Other Trends 17

Mannerism; Venice: Architecture

 

6 16th Century: Painting in Northern Europe 18, pp. 316-21, 323-25

The Netherlands: Bosch, Brueghel; Germany: Durer

6-8 17th Century: The Baroque 19

Italy, Flanders, Spain, Holland, France

8 The Early 18th Century: the Rococo Style 20 to p. 372

France and Austria

9-10 The Later 18th and Early 19th Centuries: The Revolutionary Period

20, pp. 374, 376-77; 21-22

England, France, Spain, and the United States;

works explored according to thematic content

(a more detailed outline will be distributed later)

 

11 EXAM II: A, B, C Questions (date to be announced)

 

Specific outlines for the following topics will be distributed later

 

12-13 The Later 19th Century 23, 24, 25*

14-15 The Early 20th Century 26, 27, 28 to p. 489

*Omit Photography, pp. 409-11, for lack of time.

FINAL EXAM: A, B, C and D (essay) Questions