Approved by Faculty Senate

University Studies Course Proposal: Arts And Sciences Core

FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS: ART 130 Introduction to Printmaking

This course introduces students to a variety of printmaking methods and

their aesthetic applications in the creation of original prints. Emphasis on

composition, design principles, value and color in a printmaking context.

The use of working proofs are utilized to study and direct aesthetic

judgement in the development of works in progress. The course will include

one or more of the following types of printmaking; Intaglio, Lithography,

Silkscreen, Relief, Monotype. Cultivation of good studio practice and

cooperation in the studio are fostered.

Requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to:

a. Explore the language, skills and materials of visual art

Assignments in various printmaking processes are completed during and

outside of class. Class critiques of works in progress and finished works

are an integral part of study. Printmaking and visual arts vocabulary in

general is integrated into the demonstrations, problem solving activities

and critiques.

b. Use art studio methods to actively engage in the creative process

Students:

1. Learn basic concepts in printmaking processes and approach to

two-dimensional images.

2. Explore a range of basic studio processes.

3. Learn the technical application of a variety of printmaking tools

and materials.

4. Develop perceptual skills through analyzing and identifying

visual components.

5. Demonstrate knowledge and skills of visual elements and principles

through projects and oral and written communication.

6. Develop a relationship between composition and content in

original printed works.

c. Engage in reflective analysis of their own work and respond to the work

of others

Instruction in Printmaking is mainly based on the traditional Western

approach to studio practice and artistic expression, although other contexts

and cultures (Japanese prints, African influences for example) are discussed

through their influence on particular Western artist or art movements.

Gender contexts are discussed through the impact of the lives of particular

artists or of groups in general, (limited inclusion of women and

minorities). Students are introduced to the work of other cultures and the

art of women through slide images, images in the textbook and references,

and material brought in to class in oral reports. Written response to

questions concerning cultural an gender context and subsequent class

discussions are the learning activities.

 

d. Engage in reflective analysis of their own work an respond to the

work of others

Students analyze their own work and the work of other students through

written critiques and classroom critique discussion. Students analyze the

work of professional artists through class discussions, oral reports or the

writing of a paper critiquing a current exhibition.

 

AR130 Introduction to Printmaking Syllabus

CREDITS: 3

PREREQUISITES: None

GRADING TYPE: P/NC Option non-majors.

APPLICATION: This course fulfills 3 credits of the Arts and Sciences Core

Requirements in the Humanities area of the University

Studies Program.

COURSE SYLLABUS

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

An introduction to printmaking processes and the creation of �multiple�

images. Experimental techniques, conceptualization and studio practice are

emphasized.

 

MAJOR FOCUS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE:

This course introduces students to a variety of printmaking methods and

their aesthetic applications in the creation of original prints. Emphasis on

composition, design principles, value and color in a printmaking context.

The use of working proofs are utilized to study and direct aesthetic

judgement in the development of works in progress. The course will include

one or more of the following types of printmaking; Intaglio, Lithography,

Silkscreen, Relief, Monotype. Cultivation of good studio practice and

cooperation in the studio are fostered.

The following objectives address the learning outcomes for Fine and

Performing Arts

courses in the Universities Studies program:

a. Explore the language, skills and materials of visual art

Assignments in various printmaking processes are completed during and

outside of class. Class critiques of works in progress and finished works

are an integral part of study. Printmaking and visual arts vocabulary in

general is integrated into the demonstrations, problem solving activities

and critiques.

b. Use art studio methods to actively engage in the creative process

Students:

1. Learn basic concepts in printmaking processes and approach to

two-dimensional images.

2. Explore a range of basic studio processes.

3. Learn the technical application of a variety of printmaking tools

and materials.

4. Develop perceptual skills through analyzing and identifying

visual components.

5. Demonstrate knowledge and skills of visual elements and principles

through projects and oral and written communication.

6. Develop a relationship between composition and content in

original printed works.

 

c. Engage in reflective analysis of their own work and respond to the work

of others

Instruction in Printmaking is mainly based on the traditional Western

approach to studio practice and artistic expression, although other contexts

and cultures (Japanese prints, African influences for example) are discussed

through their influence on particular Western artist or art movements.

Gender contexts are discussed through the impact of the lives of particular

artists or of groups in general, (limited inclusion of women and

minorities). Students are introduced to the work of other cultures and the

art of women through slide images, images in the textbook and references,

and material brought in to class in oral reports. Written response to

questions concerning cultural an gender context and subsequent class

discussions are the learning activities.

d. Engage in reflective analysis of their own work an respond to the

work of others

Students analyze their own work and the work of other students through

written critiques and classroom critique discussion. Students analyze the

work of professional artists through class discussions, oral reports or the

writing of a paper critiquing a current exhibition.

COURSE OUTLINE:

The knowledge base for this course is described in the section following

outline items.

A. Introduction and Course Overview

1. Purpose, scope and sequence, competencies and expectations

2. Discussion of Perception and observation

3. Historical and contemporary materials, techniques, styles, functions

4. Examples and illustrations (artworks)

B. Tools and Materials

1. Printing presses, hand tools and chemical methods

2. Materials

3. Techniques

C. Creative Processes

1. Problem Solving

2. Working Proofs

3. Influence of process and materials

4. Artist as craftsman and artisan

D. Elements

1. Shape

2. Space

3. Line and silhouette

4. Texture

5. Value

6. Color

7. Time

E. Principles

1. Proportion

2. Balance

3. Movement

4. Rhythm and repetition

5. Emphasis and dominance

6. Unity and variety

7. Size and scale

F. Criticism and Analysis

1. Individual and group critiques

2. Verbal and written analysis

BASIC INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN AND METHODS UTILIZED:

Introductory instruction of printmaking processes is through lecture, slide

lecture, video, demonstration, assigned reading, and assigned visual study (

gallery and museum viewing). Primary mode of instruction is through studio

practice‹manipulation of tools and materials to produce solution to problems

in the form of an original print.Peer consultation, individual critique,

group critique, sketches, response papers and oral reports enable students

to asses and evaluate their work.

Studio safety is emphasized. Students must be present for all

lecture/demonstration ‹ not only to obtain information on how to make a

print, but also to insure that each student understands safe procedures for

the studio and safety equipment (masks, gloves). Students are not to use

studio equipment without a demonstration and permission by the instructor.

Sensitivity and respect toward the facilities as well as your classmates.

Keep the studio in order. Permission is required to remove class tools,

supplies or books from the studio.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

A. Use of creativity and originality in the execution of final

pieces.

B. Regular attendance is expected.

C. Be prepared for class. Work needs to be at a stage ready to

progress with the class

demonstrations. Work also needs to be finished to the proper stage

for any announced critique.

D. Participate in all class discussions & critiques. Critiques may be

oral or written.

E. Research about a printmaker or group of printmakers. Present a

short oral or

written report.

METHODS OF EVALUATION:

 

A Test on printmaking vocabulary and techniques.

B. Oral Report on a printmaker or group of printmakers. The topic

needs to be approved. Book illustrations or slides are to be

incorporated into the report.

C. Critiques and Participation

D. Mid-term and Final Portfolio; Assignments to date will be included

in each

portfolio.

Prints must be editioned, (with the exception of Monotypes). At

least 5 prints in an edition.

E. Quality of Work; Work will be evaluated on the quality of thought

and

consideration put in to it. Work must demonstrate the understanding

of the assignment, the materials used, and its presentation;

craftsmanship.

F. All art works must be original and done for this course.

TEXTS / REFERENCES:

The Complete Printmaker, by John Ross and Claire Romano

Etching, Engraving and Other Intaglio Printmaking Techniques, by Ruth

Leaf

Monotype; Mediums and Methods for Painterly Printmaking, by Julia

Ayers.

 

TEXTS / REFERENCES

The Complete Printmaker, by John Ross and Claire Romano

Etching, Engraving and Other Intaglio Printmaking Techniques, by Ruth

Leaf

Monotype; Mediums and Methods for Painterly Printmaking, by Julia

Ayers.

METHODS OF STUDY

1. Lecture demonstration of printmaking processes and techniques.

2. Audio visual presentations including slide lecture and video

presentations about printmakers and processes in

historical, cultural and gender contexts.

3. The development of the vocabulary of printmaking terms and

techniques.

4. Student research, written and oral presentation of printmakers.

5. Creation of original prints by students in the processes of

relief, intaglio, lithography, silkscreen, or monotype.

6. Class critiques of works in progress and finished works.