Approved by Faculty Senate

University Studies Course Proposal: Arts And Sciences Core

HUMANITIES: ART 221 Art History I

Requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to

a. Identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of Art History as a Humanistic discipline:

ART 221 is designed as a broad survey of the History of Western Art. 221 extending from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. It is aimed at the BA student majoring in Art but open to the interested general student as well.

The class provides a knowledge base in the History of Art fostering an understanding of

1. art as a non-verbal means of communication (as a language of visual forms having its own vocabulary and structure);

2. the role of iconography in establishing the content of works of art;

3. the interaction among a work's iconography and its visual style;

4. the concept of style and attendant iconographies as a means of measuring art-historical changes across time and space among those cultures under investigation;

hence students must be able to

5. identify period styles and works of individual artists and their styles

Performance in examinations, which include essay material, determine the degree to which students have been able to identify and understand this fundamental basis art-historical studies.

b. Understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations:

Students learn via lectures, videos, and their reading assignments, of the means by which these factors fundamentally affect the creation of art: how the visual arts serve as both individual and cultural expression informed by religious, political, social, and economic conditions, as well as artistic traditions; how the artist perceives and processes the world in a given time and place; the circumstances of patronage and audience response, of politics, art politics, and economics; the social purposes of a given work; the intentions of the artist; the impact of prevailing and changing art theories, etc.

More specifically, students in ART 221 are expected to demonstrate their understanding of

1. the role of magic and ritual as a basis for the art of prehistoric peoples;

2. the ancient conventions of artistic representation and their symbolic import;

3. the Humanistic significance of Graeco-Roman forms of artistic representation;

4. the Christian rejection of Humanism in favor of an art embodying the spiritual values of the new faith;

5. the interaction during the early Middle Ages between Barbarian art forms and those surviving from Classical antiquity;

6. the role of women in the ancient and medieval worlds;

7. the formal and structural character of Medieval cathedrals, the role of their sculpture, and the religious values embodied in the total ensemble; and

8. the pictorial innovations of Italian artists of the Middle Ages as a basis for the coming Renaissance.

Performance in examinations, which include essay material, determine the degree to which students have understood how contexts and values inform the creation and interpretation of works of art.

c. Understand the role of critical analysis in interpreting and evaluating works of art:

Iconographic and formal analyses of works of art in class and in the text, reading assignments, study guides, and examination reviews enable the student in ART 221 to

1. develop critical and analytical skills in evaluating works of art,


and to employ

2. such factual information as the broad purposes and functions of specific modes of art, the techniques employed, and general chronologies and dating of style periods and individual works

so as to

3. discern differences and recognize similarities between period styles and articulate them in well written essays

Examination essay questions using slides of works of art measure how well the student has grasped both the role and mechanisms of art-critical analysis.

Art 221 Art History I Syllabus

This course fulfills 3 credits of the Arts and Sciences Core Requirement in the Humanities area of the
University Studies Program.

COURSE OBJECTIVES AND CONTENT

The following objectives address the learning outcomes for Humanities' courses in the University Studies Program:

A. Identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of Art History as a Humanistic discipline:

Art 221 is designed as a broad survey of the History of Western Art from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. It is aimed at the BA student majoring in Art but open to the interested general student as well.

The class provides a knowledge base in the History of Art fostering an understanding of

1. art as a non-verbal means of communication (as a language of visual forms having its own vocabulary and structure);

2. the role of iconography in establishing the content of works of art;

3. the interaction among a work's iconography and its visual style;

4. the concept of style and attendant iconographies as a means of measuring art-historical changes across time and space among those cultures under investigation; hence the student must be able

5. to identify period styles and works of individual artists and their styles

Performance in examinations, which include essay material, determine the degree to which students have been able to identify and understand this fundamental basis of art-historical studies.

B. Understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations of the world and human experience:

Students learn via lectures, videos, and their readings of the means by which these factors affect the creation of art: how the visual arts serve as both individual and cultural expression informed by religious, political, social, and economic conditions, as well as artistic traditions; how the artist perceives and processes the world in a given time and place; the circumstances of patronage and audience response, of politics, art politics, and economics; the social purposes of a given work; the intentions of the artist; the impact of prevailing and changing art theories, etc.

More specifically, students in ART 221 are expected to demonstrate their understanding of

1. the role of magic and ritual as a basis for the art of prehistoric peoples;

2. the ancient conventions of artistic representation and their symbolic import;

3. the Humanistic significance of Graeco-Roman forms of artistic representation;

4. the Christian rejection of Humanism in favor of an art embodying the spiritual values of the new faith;

5. the interaction during the early Middle Ages between Barbarian art forms and those surviving from Classical antiquity;

6. the role of women in the ancient and medieval worlds;

7. the formal and structural character of Medieval cathedrals, the role of their sculpture, and the religious values embodied in the total ensemble; and

8. the pictorial innovations of Italian artists of the Middle Ages as a basis for the coming Renaissance.

Performance in examinations, which include essay material, determine the degree to which students have understood how contexts and values inform the creation and interpretation of works of art.

C. Understand the role of critical analysis in interpreting and evaluating works of art:

Iconographic and formal analyses of works of art in class and in the text, readings, study guides, and examination reviews enable the student in ART 221 to

1. develop critical and analytical skills in evaluating works of art,
and to employ

2. such factual information as the broad purposes and functions of specific modes of art, the techniques employed, and general chronologies and dating of style periods and individual works, so as to

3. discern differences and recognize similarities between period styles and articulate them in well written essays.

Examination essay questions using slides of works of art measure how well the student has grasped both the role and mechanisms of art-critical analysis.

TEXTBOOK

Laurie Schneider Adams, A History of Western Art, New York: McGraw-Hill, 3rd ed., 2000.

WEB SITE: www.mhhe.com/socscience/art/adams_3_WA/

COURSE FORMAT

Lectures and occasional videos. Class discussion is encouraged and questions are always welcome.

REQUIREMENTS

Three exams including the final. Final exam is not cumulative.

EXAMS

Will consist of all or some of the following:

A. Non-visual questions such as multiple choice, eliminations, or other short answer types of questions. Of a more or less factual nature; drawn from text and lectures.

B. Slide identifications: styles/periods, countries or cultural regions, subject matter, rough dating. All slides drawn from the text.

C. Slide identifications: artists, when known; drawn from text.

D. Essay question based on slides involving matters of style, meaning or interpretation, art-historical or cultural significance, etc.; of a comparative nature. Graded separately.

NOTE: For the specifics of each exam, see next page. A review of the test material will be held prior to each exam.
For each exam bring a Scan-Tron Form 882 and a #2 pencil. Also, seating will be alphabetical during exams.

No make-up exams given. If you have a legitimate reason for missing an exam, I may excuse you from the test,
but this means your other marks will be weighted more heavily (see "Grading"). Each case considered on an individual basis.

GRADING

Each exam is worth 25% of grade; essay question 15%; attendance 10%.

ATTENDANCE

Roll will be taken each class day. Attendance grades will be given as follows:

A 0-3 absences       D 6 absences
B 4 absences         E 7+ absences
C 5 absences


COURSE SCHEDULE

The topics that follow embrace those activities and requirements, as stated on page 1, expected of Humanities courses in the University Studies Program. Such activities and requirements promote the abilities of ART 221 students to

A. Identify and understand the specific elements and assumptions of Art History as a Humanistic discipline.

B. Understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations.

C. Understand the role of critical analysis in interpreting and evaluating works of art.

Note: Always keep up with the assigned readings, and otherwise be prepared for the day’s lecture. As you read, pay
close attention to the illustrations being discussed, and study carefully the maps, timelines, and architectural diagrams
and plans. Consult the glossary in the back of the text for definitions of unfamiliar art and technical terms. In addition to
the readings, I will distribute study guides on Greek art and on Medieval art when the time comes.

Be aware that not all the topics included in the assigned chapters will be covered in class: you will not be responsible
for the omitted material. Occasionally slides of works of art will be introduced in class that are neither reproduced nor
discussed in your text: again, you are not responsible for these but do remember why they are brought into the class
discussions.

Week Chapter

1 A framework for the study of the History of Art: The interrelationships
of style, period, and culture                                                                                     1 (read only)

1 The Prehistoric Era: Art Before Writing

A. Paleolithic period (c. 25,000-8000 BC)                                             3 Europe
B. Neolithic period (c. 6000/4000-2000 BC)                                          4 Europe
The Near (Middle) East

2. The Historic Era

                            A. Mesopotamia (Iraq and Syria, and also Iran)                                      4 (cont)

Sumer (c. 4500-2300 BC) and Neo-Sumeria (c. 2150-1800 BC)
Akkad (c. 2340-2180 BC) and "Old" Babylon (c. 1900-539 BC)
Assyria (c. 1100-612 BC) and Neo-Babylonia (612-539 BC)
Persia (Achaemenid Empire, Iran, 539-331 BC) )

3                  B. Egypt                                                                                           5

Early Dynastic and Old Kingdom (c. 3100-2150 BC)
New Kingdom (c.1550-1070 BC)
Amarna Period (Akhenaten’s Style, 1349-1336 BC)

4 C. The Aegean Region (Pre-Greek)                                                                      6

Cycladic Islands (off the Greek coast, c. 3000-1200 BC)
Minoan (Island of Crete, off the Greek coast, c. 3000-1500 BC)
Mycenaean (Greek mainland, c. 1600-1200 BC))

5 Exam I (date to be announced), A and B questions

The Mediterranean World

    5-7  A.Greek Art (a study guide will be distributed)                                                    7
    8     B. Etruscan Art (Italy, c. 700-450 BC))                                                              8
    8-9 C. Roman Art (Italy)                                                                                          9
              From the late Republic to the late Empire (c. 200 BC-330s AD
              By media: Architecture, Sculpture, and Painting

10 Exam II (date to be announced), A, B, C, and D questions

11 Christianity
                 A. Early Christian Art (Italy only)

Before and After Constantine (c. 200-500 AD)                                     10

B. Byzantine Art (Italy, Constantinople [Istanbul, Turkey], Greece)

The Time of Justinian (c. 500-600 AD)                                                10 (cont)

12-13 The Middle Ages in Northern Europe
         (A study guide will be distributed) 11 (omit Islamic),                                                        12-13

14-15 The Later Middle Ages in Italy and Flanders, (c. 1250-1500)
         The Precursors of the Renaissance
              1. Italy: Painting and Sculpture                                                                                   14
              2. Flanders (modern Belgium and Burgundy, France): Painting                                      15

FINAL EXAM: A B and C questions