Course Approved by Faculty Senate

WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

PROPOSALS FOR NEW COURSES

 

A. DESCRIPTION OF THE COURSE: see syllabus

B. RATIONALE FOR NEW COURSE

    1. Focus and Objectives: see syllabus
    2. Contribution to departmental curriculum: NONE This course is being offered to help satisfy the demand for Fine and Performing Arts courses in the new General education curriculum
    3. Courses to be dropped: NONE

C. Statement of impact:

    1. This course is not duplictious, and does not affect prerequisites.
    2. This course approval does not affect the numbers of credits required by any major or minor of any department.
    3. This course has no effect on majors or minors of any departments.

D. University Studies

This course fulfills the Fine and Performing Arts requirement for University Studies. (3 cr.) It is a sorely needed offering that includes an experiential component to a large number of students. Other Art Department studio classes fulfill this requirement, but offerings are limited and generally are almost filled with majors and minors, offering only a few seats to University Studies students each semester. This course will provide 120 seats each semester to students seeking to fulfill that US requirement.

 

University Studies Course Approval

Department or Program: _Art Department_________________________________________

Course Number: _110________

Course Title: _Experiencing Art__________________________________________________

Catalog Description: Introductory course for the non-major that includes an experiential, hands-on, art-making component. Elements and principles of design, styles, cultural and gender contexts, materials and techniques, content, meaning, and expression are all investigated in a non-chronological historical and contemporary context

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2 _____.

OR

This is a new course proposal __XX___. (If this is a new course proposal, the WSU Curriculum Approval Form must also be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)

Department Contact Person for this course Prof. Anne Scott Plummer

Email: _aplummer@winona.edu____________________________

The proposed course is designed to satisfy the requirements in (select one area only):

Course Requirements

A. Basic Skills: (October 4, 2000)

B. Arts & Sciences Core: (November 1, 2000)

______ 1. College Reading and Writing

______ 2. Oral Communication

______ 3. Mathematics

______ 4. Physical Development and Wellness

______ 1. Humanities

______ 2. Natural Science

______ 3. Social Science

_XX__ 4. Fine & Performing Arts

C. Unity and Diversity: (January 17, 2001)

Flagged Courses: (February 14, 2001)

______ 1. Critical Analysis

______ 2. Science and Social Policy

______ 3. a. Global Perspectives

______ b. Multicultural Perspectives

______ 4. a. Contemporary Citizenship

______ b. Democratic Institutions

______ 1. Writing

______ 2. Oral

______ 3. a. Mathematics/ Statistics

______ b. Critical Analysis

 

University Studies Proposal: Arts and Sciences Core

FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS: ART 110 Experiencing Art

This is a large-enrollment class of about 120 students.

This course introduces beginning students to art as a new language, one that is visual, and develops their creative and analytical skills in understanding and using this language. Among the topics introduced are:

I. The vocabulary of art: lines, colors, shapes, space, etc. and how these elements are organized coherently and expressively in a work of art

II. How various materials and techniques have and continue to be used to create works of art

III. The concept of style and examples, such as realistic representation, abstraction, formal order, minimalism, surrealism, primitivism, and expressionism

IV. The work of art as a vehicle of human expression

V. The capacity of art to convey meaning

VI. How expression and feeling, style and meaning interrelate in works of art

VII. Finally, how the preceding topics contribute to the students’ hands-on experiences in art-making activities and in analyzing and critiquing their own work as well as campus installations and exhibitions

Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:

bulletExplore the language, skills and materials of visual art

Slide lectures, videos, films, and text reading will theoretically introduce the student to content and meaning, the vocabulary of art, the expressive organization of elements, and varieties of styles, as detailed above.

bulletuse art studio methods to actively engage in the creative process

Hands-on experiential projects are assigned to be completed outside of class. The media are selected according to the availability of materials and tools. Students will analyze and critique their own work.

bulletunderstand the cultural and gender contexts of artistic expression

Experiencing Art is based on the contemporary Western approach to art. In particular, students are introduced to the arts and to design, both historic and contemporary, acknowledging the contributions of non-Western cultures and women. Students will respond to topics in their journals.

bulletengage in reflective analysis of their own work and respond to the work of others

Students analyze their own work and the work of others shown in campus installations and exhibitions. They use journal writing to analyze their own works. They engage in small group discussions (with a prepared form) to critique professional art works.

 

 

 

Experiencing Art (Art 110)

Prof. Raymond Kiihne

CREDITS: 3 PREREQUISITES: None GRADING TYPE: P/NC Option non-majors

APPLICATION: This course fulfills 3 credits of the Arts and Sciences Core Requirements in the Fine and Performing Arts area of the University Studies Program

COURSE SYLLABUS

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

Introductory course for the non-major that includes an experiential, hands-on, art-making component. Elements and principles of design, styles, cultural and gender contexts, materials and techniques, content, meaning, and expression are all investigated in a non-chronological historical and contemporary context.

MAJOR FOCUS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE:

This course introduces beginning students to art as a new language, one that is visual, and develops their creative and analytical skills in understanding and using this language. Among the topics introduced are:

I. The vocabulary of art: lines, colors, shapes, space, etc. and how these elements are organized coherently and expressively in a work of art

II. How various materials and techniques have and continue to be used to create works of art

III. The concept of style and examples, such as realistic representation, abstraction, formal order, minimalism, surrealism, primitivism, and expressionism

IV. The work of art as a vehicle of human expression

V. The capacity of art to convey meaning

VI. How expression and feeling, style and meaning interrelate in works of art

VII. Finally, how the preceding topics contribute to the students’ hands-on experiences in art-making activities and in analyzing and critiquing their own work as well as campus installations and exhibitions

The following objectives address the learning outcomes for Fine and Performing Arts courses in the University Studies program:

Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:

    1. Explore the language, skills and materials of visual art
    2. Slide lectures, videos, films, and text reading will theoretically introduce the student to content and meaning, the vocabulary of art,, the expressive organization of elements, and varieties of styles, as detailed above.

    3. use art studio methods to actively engage in the creative process

Hands-on experiential projects are assigned to be completed outside of class. The media are selected according to the availability of materials and tools. Students will analyze and critique their own work.

 

 

 

bulletunderstand the cultural and gender contexts of artistic expression

Experiencing Art is based on the contemporary Western approach to art. In particular, students are introduced to the arts and to design, both historic and contemporary, acknowledging the contributions of non-Western cultures and women. Students will respond to topics in their journals.

    1. engage in reflective analysis of their own work and respond to the work of others
    2. Students analyze their own work and the work of others shown in campus installations and exhibitions. They use journal writing to analyze their own works. They engage in small group discussions (with a prepared form) to critique professional art works.

    3. Explore the language, skills and materials of visual art

Slide lectures, videos, films, and text reading will theoretically introduce the student to content and meaning, the vocabulary of art,, the expressive organization of elements, and varieties of styles, as detailed above.

COURSE OUTLINE:

Learning to see

bulletUnderstanding art
bulletThe Creative impulse bulletContent bulletForms of art bulletCritical opinion bulletVisual elements bulletLine bulletShape and form bulletSpace bulletTexture bulletValue and light bulletColor bulletTime bulletOrganizing principles of design bulletRepetition bulletVariety bulletRhythm bulletBalance bulletCompositional unity bulletEmphasis bulletEconomy bulletProportion bulletRelationship to the environment  

Two-dimensional media and methods

I. Drawing

II. Painting

  1. Printmaking
  2. Graphic design
  3. Photography, photocopy, and filmmaking
  4. Computer graphics

Three-dimensional media and methods

I. Sculpture

II. Crafts/Folkart

III. Product and clothing design

IV. Architecture

Art in time

I. Historical styles in Western art

  1. Influences from non-Western societies (Japanese printmaking, Moorish ornamentation, etc)

 

 

BASIC INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN AND METHODS UTILIZED:

Slide lectures, videos, and text reading introduce the student to the materials. Exams and quizzes help evaluate student learning. Hands-on experiential art projects are completed and self-analyzed through journal writing and project evaluation forms. Small discussion groups critique campus art works.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: (approximate percentages)

bulletExams 40% bulletProjects 30% bulletAttendance 15% bulletQuizzes 10% bulletJournal Writing 5% bulletReadings from text (reflected on exams)

METHODS OF EVALUATION:

Student grades will be based upon exams and projects as shown above. Slide lectures are used to develop visual awareness, analytical skills, and memory. Slide-related tests will constitute the main portion of the grade (40%). Learning projects will constitute approximately 30% of the grade. Detailed assignment requirements will be provided. So long as students meet these requirements, they will earn full credit for each project. The emphasis is on freeing the student to explore technique and form. Late assignments that are fully satisfactory will forfeit one point for each week late.

TEXTBOOK:

Zelanski, Fisher. The Art of Seeing fourth edition

REFERENCES:

Collins, Judith. Techniques of Modern Art. New York: Secaucus, Chartwell Books, 1983.

Elkins, James. How to Use Your Eyes. NY: Routledge, 2000.

Mumford, Lewis. Techniques and Civilization. NY: Harcourt Brace & World, 1934.

Nelson, George. Problems in Design. NY: Whitney, 1955.

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

    1. 3 Scan-tron forms #882
bullet2 glue sticks bullet6+ magazines (old or new) with full color ads bulletone each of the following: scissors, ruler, plastic triangle, compass

pocket folder

bullettyping paper in a pad bulletspiral-bound sketch book (approx 8 1/2 X 11") bulletpacket construction paper in mixed colors, 8 1/2 X 11" bulletdisposable camera (or 35 mm camera) bulletcolored pencils, 24 pack bulletebony drawing pencil bulletpencil sharpener bulletSharpie ultra fine point marker, or similar