Approved by Faculty Senate December 2, 2002

 

University Studies Course Approval

Department or Program: Biology

Course Number: BIOL 307

Number of Credits: 1

Course Title: Cell Biology Laboratory

Catalog Description: Cell Biology Laboratory-1 S.H. An experimental study of the cell as a biological unit. Use of histochemistry, spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, centrifugation, microscopy and statistics in the analysis of ultrastructure, macromolecular organization and function of cell components in plants and animals. Prerequisites: Biol 241, Biol 242, Biol 312, Biol 308 (or concurrent enrollment in 308), 310 (or concurrent registration in 310), and Chem 340. Offered yearly.

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2: Yes

This is a new course proposal: No.
(If this is a new course proposal, the WSU Curriculum Approval Form must also be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)

Department contact Person for this course: Steven P. Berg

Email: sberg@winona.edu

A2C2 requires 55 copies of the proposal

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The proposed course is designed to satisfy the requirements in (select one area only):

Course Requirements:

A. Basic Skills:
     1. College Reading and Writing ____
     2. Oral Communication ____
     3. Mathematics ____
     4. Physical Development and Wellness ____

B. Arts & Sciences Core:
     1. Humanities ____
     2. Natural Sciences ____
     3. Social Science ____
     4. Fine & Performing Arts ____
C. Unity and Diversity:
     1. Critical Analysis ____
     2. Science and Social Policy ____
     3.a. Global Perspectives ____
        b. Multicultural Perspectives ____
     4.a. Contemporary Citizenship ____
        b. Democratic Institutions ____
D. Flagged Courses
     1. Writing ____
     2. Oral    X  
     3.a. Mathematics/Statistics ____
        b. Critical analysis ____
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Approval/Disapproval Recommendations

Department Recommendation:  Approved: ___X___           Disapproved _____       Date: 10/25/02

Dean's Recommendation:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

USS Recommendation:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

A2C2 Recommendation:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

Faculty Senate Recommendation:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

Academic Vice President's Recommendation:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

President's Decision:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

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Material Submitted for Course Approval

Overview of BIOL 307: Cell Biology Laboratory: BIOL 307 is designed to help second year biology majors develop their knowledge of and laboratory skills in biology at a cellular and molecular level. This course serves as one of several foundation courses and is a prerequisite for many other courses in the biology department. Normally students take Biology 307 during their second year in the biology program. Virtually all of the students taking Biology 307 have already taken Communication Studies 191. The oral component in Cell Biology Laboratory is an important part of the class. Effective oral communication skills are as critical to science students as there are to students of the humanities. To that end, Biology 307 emphasizes the oral presentation of discipline specific material as a significant portion of the required activities of the course. Students give at least two presentations. Each presentation is evaluated both by the instructor and (annonymously) by the presenter's peers. The presenter receives copies of the evaluation materials. The first presentation, together with the concomitant evaluation, does not enter into the presenter's grade. Rather, the first presentation is intended to help the presenting student improve their second presentation. The second presentation is also evaluated both by the instructor and by the students. The presenter receives copies of all evaluation materials. The instructor's evaluation of the second presentation is used to help determine the student's final grade in the class. The student evaluations will be given to the presenter to allow improvement of oral presentations in other venues.




1. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:
earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations.

This requirement is met as the students give at least two evaluated oral presentations. Both of these presentations are evaluated both by the instructor and, annonymously, by the student peers. The first oral presentation is intended to be an ungraded practice presentation. The purpose of the first set of evaluations is to provide a feedback mechanism such the second, graded presentation will be an improvement over the first. Although some of the discipline specific information is different in the two presentations, the key elements and overall content of the actual oral presentation will remain essentially constant. The points associated with the graded oral presentation will represent approximately 25% of the total points available in this course and as such, will contribute significantly toward final grade earned in the class.

 

2. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:
understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines.

This outcome is addressed as students give at least two oral presentations in Cell Biology Lab. This lab course will require students to have access to a text such as Communicating in Science : Writing a Scientific Paper and Speaking at Scientific Meetings by Vernon Booth or Dazzle 'Em With Style: The Art of Oral Scientific Presentation by Robert R. H. Anholt. These texts, together with in class instruction, will help students learn the key features of scientific speaking. The formative evaluation of the first presentation is focused on this requirement.

 

3. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:
adapt their speaking to field-specific audiences.

This requirement is met as the students give their two oral presentations. The audience will be the same for both presentations. The audience will be familiar with some aspects of what is presented and will be completely unfamiliar with other aspects of the presentations. The presenting students will need to shape their presentations such that when more familiar material is presented, the depth and pace of presentation is modified relative to parts of the presentation that are new and unfamiliar. The formative evaluation of the first presentation is focused on satisfying this requirement.

 

4. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:
receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement.

This requirement is satisfied as the students do two presentations. The first presentation is evaluated but ungraded. This purpose of this evaluation is to provide a feedback mechanism to the students so that they can improve their second, graded presentation. The second presentation will also be evaluated and all evaluations will be made available to the student allowing improvement of public speaking beyond the scope of this course.

 

5. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:
make use of the technologies used for research and speaking in the fields.

This requirement is met with the requirement that students use appropriate tools and media to support their presentations. In recent years, power point presentations with embedded graphics and images have become standard in Cell Biology 307, but some students do occasionally choose other presentational technology.

 

5. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:
learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

This requirement is met as the students do their two presentations. In the first presentation, students present an oral description of their proposed independent investigation. This presentation focuses on parts of the scientific process including the scientific question, the testable hypothesis and the experiments or observations that are intended test the hypothesis. Possible experimental results are discussed in the context of support for the hypothesis. The oral presentation and the proposed independent investigation must use all the conventions of evidence, format, usage and documentation appropriate to the discipline of cell biology. In the second presentation, the students present their actual independent investigation. This more detailed presentation reiterates the process of science components (scientific question, testable hypothesis, experimental tests) from the first presentation but then goes beyond by presenting the actual results obtained along with the analysis and discussion of the results in the context of the available literature.





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Sample Instructor Evaulation Form

Presenter:                                                                                        Start Time:     End Time:    
Title:             Length:     Within Limit: Yes No



  Yes Partial No
Content and Organization                                                                                                      
Was the purpose clearly stated?      
Was the speaker prepared?      
Did the introduction gain attention and preview the presentation?      
Were the main points clearly stated?      
Did the conclusions end the oral presentation appropriately?      
Visual Aids      
Were visual aids used?      
Were they clear and interesting?      
Types used?      
Style and Delivery      
Were ideas presented concretely and specifically?      
Was the language appropriate to the audience?      
Was the language vivid?      
Was the speaker enthusiastic about the material?      
Did the speaker look at the audience throughout the presentation?      
Was a conversational style used?      
Did the speaker use sufficient vocal variety and emphasis?      
Was the speaker poised?      
Overall Effectiveness      
Good personal impression?      
Purpose achieved?      
Overall opinion of the speech?







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Peer Evaluation Form (Completed by students in audience)

Presenter:
Date:
Topic:

Content and Organization:
This concerns the content of the presentation. Was the message covered thoroughly and understandably within the time limit? Are outside sources properly cited? Was the speaker persuasive?

Identify one or two things done well regarding the the content and organization.



Identify one or two things the speaker might do to improve the content of the presentation. Explain why and how.







Visual Aids
This includes all aspects (content, clarity and appeal) of the visual aids used in the presentation.

Indicate one or two things that you think were done well with regard to the visual aids.



Indicate one or two things the speaker might do to improve the visual aids associated with their presentation. Explain why you think this would improve the presentation.







Delivery

This includes all aspects of the verbal and nonverbal delivery (rate, volume, enunciation, conversational style, enthusiasm, poise, eye contact, facial expression, gesticulation).

Identify one or two aspects of the delivery that you think the speaker does well.



Identify one or two aspects of the delivery that you think the speaker could improve. What suggestions do you make that will improve these areas?



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Syllabus for Cell Biology Laboratory 307

Spring 2003 Dr. Steven P. Berg, Instructor
Course Description
University Studies
Instructor Expectations
Course Requirements
Grading Policy
Instructor Information
Office Hours
Schedule (Labs/Exams/Etc.)
Rochester Students
Lab Notebook
Notebook Evaluation Form
Investigative Lab
Written Project Report
Oral Project Presentations (This is an Oral Flag Course)
Results From Past Labs

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Contact Dr. Steven Berg by email
Return to Dr. Berg's homepage
Return to the Cell Biology Laboratory 307 homepage
Return to Biology Department Homepage
Return to the Winona State University Homepage





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Catalog Description for Cell Biology 307

307 Cell Biology (1 SH): An experimental study of the cell as a biological unit. Use of histochemistry, spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, centrifugation, microscopy and statistics in analysis of ultrastructure, macromolecular organization and function of the cell components in plants and animals. Prerequisites: Biology 241, 242, 312 and concurrent registration in Biology 308 and Organic Chemistry 340 or Organic Chemistry 350. Offered yearly.

 

Instructor's Expectations and Policies

Adequate student preparation for the laboratory is required. Students cannot effectively use their laboratory time without very thorough preparation prior to coming to lab. Assessments of student's preparation for lab may be made through the use of unannounced quizzes before, during or after laboratories. Attendance at laboratories is required. There will be no make-up quizzes or exams. Under truly unusual circumstances (serious illness or personal emergencies which have been excused by the VP for Student Affairs or which can be verified by other means), course requirements may be satisfied in other ways.


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Course Requirements

To receive credit for this course, students must demonstrate mastery of the course content by earning the appropriate number of points on exams, quizzes, lab notebooks, lab/project reports and oral presentations as detailed under grading policy


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Grading Policy for Cell Biology Laboratory 307 (Spring 2001)

Grades in this class will be determined on a non-competitive basis. It is possible for every student to earn an "A" grade.

The instructor will add the points earned on graded materials. Grades will be determined by evaluation of the distribution of total points. There will be no makeup exams or quizzes in this class. The points assigned to different requirements of the course are as follows: Lab Notebook (50 points); Lab Exam (50 points); at least two Oral Project Presentations (50 points); Written Project Report (50 points); Quizzes (up to 50 points). Attendence at all laboratories is required. Grades will be lowered 1 letter grade for each unexcused absence. The instructor reserves the right to raise or lower the points earned by any student up to a maximum of 25 points based on the instructors subjective evaluation of the student's class participation, attendence, preparation and/or effort.

bulletStudents earning 90% or more of the points earned by the top student in the class will receive the grade of "A". bulletStudents earning 80% or more of the points earned by the top student in the class will receive the grade of "B". bulletStudents earning 70% or more of the points earned by the top student in the class will receive the grade of "C". bulletStudents earning 60% or more of the points earned by the top student in the class will receive the grade of "D". bulletStudents earning less than 60% of the points earned by the top student in the class will receive the grade of "F".


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General Information For Cell Biology Laboratory 307

Instructor Dr. Steven P. Berg
Telephone
Email
507-457-5277
sberg@winona.edu
Office Hours  
308 Lectures MWF 3:00 to 3:50 p.m.
Laboratories H 9-12 or H 2-5 or H 7-10 p.m.
Lab Manual Individual exercises are available as MS Word documents. See the Schedule of Labs


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Project/Lab Report: The lab report should be written in the format and style and detailed in the handout. Since the report will be edited, it is recommended that the report be written with a word processor and that the graphs be done using a graphing program of some kind.

Lab Notebooks: In Cell Biology 307 you are expected to maintain a notebook as if you were practicing science in a research laboratory. This notebook will be of practical value to you because you will be allowed to use it when you write your laboratory exam. You will not be allowed to use any other materials. In addition, you may be modifying a number of procedures so that they are better suited to your situation and to the specific equipment at WSU. You will want to have any and all changes detailed in your notebook so that when you repeat a procedure the changes are readily available to you. Thus, it is in your interest to have as much detailed information as possible written down. Because this is a teaching situation, I will not allow any photocopied text in your notebook. In the research lab, photocopies are frequently used directly in lab notebooks. The exception to the no photocopy rule will be for the Phase Contrast Microscopy Lab. This lab should be printed and taped directly into your lab notebook as a handy reference whenever you need to use a microscope. However, be forewarned that there may be a closed book practical exam covering the proper utility of the phase contrast microscope. Photocopied images, prints of gels, printed graphs from your computer, etc. will be allowed throughout your notebook. In fact, you are encouraged to use the digital camera to capture images of your results and to place printed copies into your notebook for later reference. You are also encouraged to use the digital cameras connected to the microscope to collect images to place in your notebooks. You are further encouraged to do your graphing with a computer and place spreadsheets of data and printed graphs into your notebook.

For your notebook, I recommend that you use a cheap, spiral bound notebook, roughly 8 X 11 inches. Do not use a looseleaf notebook!

The format of your notebook should be as described below. For each laboratory exercise, you will want the following information carefully organized in your laboratory notebook:

Start each lab on a fresh page separated from the previous lab by at least one blank sheet.

Use transparent tape to make a tab that sticks above the upper edge of the page. The tab should indicate the LAB DATE. Every day that you are actually working in the lab should have its own tab and a full write up.

Write in ink.

All the various parts of each notebook entry should be very clearly indicated with colored highlighter. For instance, the words "Background information" should be on a separate line and highlighted with color.

Do not erase or scribble over errors. To correct an error, simply cross out the incorrect text with a single line and rewrite correct text after or above the crossed out text.

Make sure you provide all the information requested below for each laboratory.

Page number of notebook (start on p 1 and do every page to the end of the notebook)
Date of entry (make sure to date each day of activity associated with an given lab)
Experiment #
Experiment title
Background information
Purpose of the exercise
Expected results
Detailed description of the procedure
Actual results obtained described in detail sufficient to appropriately interpret the results (data, drawings, tables, figures, rhetoric)
Discussion of your results

-Results as expected?
-Compare/contrast with expected results
-Interpretation of results

Analysis of procedure

-Everything as expected?
-Problems?
-Cause of problems?
-Changes in procedure if the exercise is repeated?

Answers to study questions from lab manual
Answers to additional study questions from instructor

After the lab final exam, you will turn in your notebook for evaluation. The lab notebook will be evaluated using a evaluation form something like the form detailed below. Note that only one randomly chosen lab will be evaluated in detail.

 








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Notebook Evaluation Form
Student Name_________________
Cell Biology 307

 

The notebook for Cell Biology 307 is worth a maximum of 50 points. Students will be allowed to use their notebooks as tools when taking their laboratory exam. Thus, those students who put more effort into their notebooks will probably be rewarded with higher scores on their laboratory test. In addition, the notebooks will also be evaluated independently by randomly sampling and grading one or more labs as indicated below .

 

 

Notebook entry for each formal lab (3 points/lab * 8 labs = 24 points):

 

Study Questions answered for the randomly selected lab (10 points):

 

 

 

Required entries present for the randomly selected lab (1 point/item * 13 item = 13 points)

 

1 Table of Contents with page numbers
2 Page number of notebook
3 Date of entry
4 Experiment #
5 Experiment title
6 Background information
7 Purpose of the exercise
8 Expected results
9 Detailed description of the procedure
10 Actual results obtained described in detail sufficient to appropriately interpret the results (data, drawings, tables, figures, rhetoric)
11 Discussion of your results

Results as expected?
Compare/contrast with expected results
Interpretation of results

12 Analysis of procedure

Everything as expected?
Problems?
Cause of problems?
Changes in procedure if the exercise is repeated?

13 Answers to study questions from lab manual

 

Overall Neatness and Organization (3 points)

 






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Investigative Lab: Each student group will develop one or more scientific questions which can be answered using one or more of the techniques learned and practiced during the first half of the semester. The instructor may have to limit which techniques will be employed for logistical reasons. Student groups must make a scientific observation, develop a scientific question, explain the observation with an appropriate hypothesis, make an experimentally testable prediction based on the hypothesis, test the prediction by doing the experiment, record the results, interpret the results and explain the results as they relate to their hypothesis. Student groups should thoroughly discuss each aspect of the lab process. Groups should agree on the actual results collected, but they should not necessarily agree on the interpretation of the results. Differences in interpretation can be addressed in the discussion. Each group will work together to write a common lab report.

 

 

Group Size: Groups will normally be 2. Groups larger than 2 are discouraged must be approved in advance by the instructor. Groups larger than 2 will be expected to produce proportionately more data , to write proportionately longer, more detailed lab reports and to give longer, more detailed oral presentations.

 

 

Written Lab Report for the Investigative Lab: One thorough written report covering the investigative lab will be prepared by each group as a group effort. All members of the group will initially get the same credit for the report. However, the final points earned by an individual will be influenced by the evaluations submitted by peers. Because it is a group report, the report will be expected to withstand the highest level of editorial scrutiny. Reports should be carefully edited for proper English usage. Poor English usage will result in significant point deductions. See the Lab Report Grading Sheet.

 

The typed lab report must contain the following parts (shown in boldface print). These parts should be clearly indicated in in the report with boldface print.

Title Page with the information below:

Title of Investigation
Names of students in the group
Course name and number
Day and Time of lab
Date

Abstract: A succinct paragraph summarizing the major results and the discussion points of your paper. You should very briefly describe the experiments, the results and the conclusions. You should be very specific and concise. Make the abstract able to stand alone and still make sense to the reader. It is usually best to write the abstract AFTER completing the rest of your report. Do not copy any text from the lab manual or other sources and place it in your abstract. Write your own text.

Scientific Observation: Clearly state in one or two sentences the scientific observation made by your group. For example, a group might observe that a mouse dies after being bitten by a rattlesnake.

Scientific Question: Clearly state a single scientific question which arises from the scientific observation. In our rattlesnake example the group might ask, "Why did the mouse die after being bitten by the rattlesnake?"

Hypothesis: Clearly state the tentative hypothesis which could, if correct, explain the scientific observation and answer the scientific question raised by your group. The group might come up with the hypothesis that "Rattlesnakes inject toxic venom into mice during the biting process."

Prediction: Clearly state your experimental prediction in the form of "If hypothesis, then prediction of the experiment results. An example of a prediction based on the hypothesis above would be: "If rattlesnakes inject toxic venom into mice to kill them, then removal of the venom delivery apparatus (the fangs) should prevent the rattlesnake bite from delivering the venom to the mouse and causing the death of a mouse." In the prediction section, you will be actually predicting the outcome of the experiment upon which you are reporting.

Introduction: A few paragraphs which provide the background information necessary for a reader to understand what experiments were done and why they were done. The introduction should set the stage for your scientific arguments to follow. It places your work in a broad theoretical context and gives the reader enough information to appreciate your objectives. A good introduction "hooks" the readers, interesting them in the study. Usually, it is easiest to write the introduction AFTER you have completed the rest of the manuscript. Do not copy any text from the lab manual or other sources and place it in your Introduction. Write your own text.

Materials and Methods: A few paragraphs of text which provide enough information so that the experiments could be repeated by another individual. However, the Materials and Methods section should be as short as possible. Do not copy any text from the lab manual or other sources and place it in your materials and methods section. Write your own text.Materials: Give complete taxonomic information about all the organisms that you use. Specify how the organisms were obtained. Carefully, describe any laboratory equipment which you used, avoiding brand names unless absolutely necessary. Specify the composition, source and quantities of chemical substances, growth media, test solutions and so on. Because they are more widely understood, use generic rather than brand names. Methods: Describe the various procedures in detail. Do not forget crucial details such as temperature, pH, photoperiod, duration of observations, sampling dates, electrophoretic voltage, amperage and duration, electrophoretic standards used, etc. Organize the Materials and Methods section in some kind of logical order. Omit unnecessary information. Include only those procedures directly pertaining to the results which will be reported. Do not include superfluous details or asides. Do not refer the reader to any other section of the manuscript. The Materials and Methods section should stand alone. Again, do not copy any text or any procedures from the lab manual or other sources and place it in your materials and methods section. Write your own text.

Results: This is one of the most important sections of your paper and should be one of the longest parts. This section should have text specifically stating what you did and describing the results obtained in more detail. There should be explicit reference to each of your figures, tables, graphs, photographs, etc. Incorporate your Figures and Tables directly into your text whenever possible. You should summarize and illustrate your findings with appropriately labeled figures and tables. You should summarize the data, emphasizing important patterns and trends. You should illustrate and support your generalizations with explanatory details, statistic and examples of representative (or atypical) cases. Present your data in logical order. Often the best order is the order in which the experiments were done. However, this is not always the case. Use a logical order. Tell the story of your research efforts. Use the past tense. Do not do lengthy interpretation of the data. Do not compare your results with those of others in the results section. It is okay to draw conclusions immediately having stating the results, but avoid discussing the results relative to other work unless necessary. The results section should be a straightforward report of the data which you gathered. Integrate quantitative data with the text. If the results section includes tables, figures, photographs or diagrams, be sure to refer to each in the text, pointing out the most important information contained in the figure, table or photo. For example you might write, "Table 1 shows that all 13 rattlesnakes with surgically removed fangs were unable to kill a mouse with a single strike, while 7 of 10 control rattlesnakes were successful at killing a mouse with one strike." Omit peripheral information and unnecessary details. All figures and tables should be labeded and numbered. There should be a legend to help the reader understand the figure or table. Figures, such as those with several lanes or wells, should have the lanes and wells clearly identified and labeled. Do not copy any text from the lab manual or other sources and place it in your results section. Write your own text.

Discussion: Summarize and interpret all your results, supporting your conclusions with the experimental evidence. In the results section you reported your findings; now you need to tell the reader what you think your findings mean. Do the data support your original hypothesis? Why or why not? Refer to your data, citing figures and tables when necessary. If possible relate your work and findings to those of others. Do not present every conceivable explanation, just those which are most important. Recognize the importance of "negative" results. Do not expect that your hypothesis will be supported. Usually in science they are not. Make your prose convey confidence and authority, but do not overstate your findings. Remember to use coherent logical organization. Never use phrases like "Our results proved......" or " We proved our hypothesis to be true." In science, experimental results "support" or "do not support" the hypothesis. NOTHING is "proven" and NOTHING is "true". Do not copy any text from the lab manual or other sources and place it in your discussion section. Write your own text.

References: If appropriate, provide a citation in a consistent standard format. It is usually best to list the references in alphabetical order according to the last name of the first author as indicated in the example below.

ReferencesAbelson, A., Olson, S., and Smith, W., (1993) Surgical removal of fangs has little effect on the first strike killing capacity of Biggus pythonius. J. Herpetol. Res. 343:213-226.

 

Jefferson, P., (1993) Personal communication.

 

Zilchus, Zachary (1993) "Oral surgery in reptiles" in Snake Venoms (Stockton and Thornber, eds) Plenum Press, New York, pp 56-89.

 

 

Evaluations: Each member of the group MUST evaluate themselves as well as each member of the group. Each member of the group MUST use the "Evaluation Form" and submit their evaluation to the instructor.




Oral Presentations: The oral presentations in Cell Biology 307 are worth 50 points. Students have at least two opportunities to make oral presentations. The first presentation describes what the students plan to do for their independent investigation. This first presentation focuses on the initial parts of the scientific process including the scientific question, the testable hypothesis and the proposed experiments and/or observations that are intended test the hypothesis. Possible experimental results are discussed in the context of support for the testable hypothesis. The oral presentation and the proposed independent investigation must use all the conventions of evidence, format, usage and documentation appropriate to the discipline of cell biology. The first presentation will be evaluated, but not graded. The evaluations, both by the instructor and by the other students in the class, will be given to the presenter as a means of providing feedback that will allow the second, graded, presentation to be an improvement over the first presentation. In the second presentation, the students present their actual independent investigation. This longer, more detailed presentation reiterates the process of science components (scientific question, testable hypothesis, experimental tests) from the first presentation but then goes beyond by presenting the actual results obtained along with the analysis and discussion of the results in the context of the available literature. The second presentation will also be evaluated by both the instructor and by the other students in the class. The instructor will grade the second presentation. There will be a strict time limit on both presentations. The presentations should use appropriate supporting media such as power point or overheads.