Approved by University Studies Sub-committee.  A2C2 action pending.

 

University Studies Course Approval:

Department or Program: Biology

Course Number: BIOL 211

Number of Credits: 4

Course Title: Anatomy and Physiology I

Catalog Description: First course of a year-long sequence for students in Nursing and Health and Human Performance.  Includes terminology and orientation of the body, basics of chemistry, cytology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.  Lecture and laboratory. Offered yearly.

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2: Yes

This is a new course proposal: No.
(If this is a new course proposal, the WSU Curriculum Approval Form must also be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)

Department contact Person for this course: Dave Dapkus

Email: ddapkus@winona.edu

A2C2 requires 55 copies of the proposal

 

horizontal rule

The proposed course is designed to satisfy the requirements in (select one area only):

Course Requirements:

A. Basic Skills:
     1. College Reading and Writing ____
     2. Oral Communication ____
     3. Mathematics ____
     4. Physical Development and Wellness ____

B. Arts & Sciences Core:
     1. Humanities ____
     2. Natural Sciences    X  
     3. Social Science ____
     4. Fine & Performing Arts ____
C. Unity and Diversity:
     1. Critical Analysis ____
     2. Science and Social Policy ____
     3.a. Global Perspectives ____
        b. Multicultural Perspectives ____
     4.a. Contemporary Citizenship ____
        b. Democratic Institutions ____
D. Flagged Courses
     1. Writing ____
     2. Oral ____
     3.a. Mathematics/Statistics ____
        b. Critical analysis ____

 

horizontal rule

Approval/Disapproval Recommendations

Department Recommendation:  Approved   Yes           Disapproved _____       Date 22 Sept 2000

Dean's Recommendation:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

USS Recommendation:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

A2C2 Recommendation:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

Faculty Senate Recommendation:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

Academic Vice President's Recommendation:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

President's Decision:  Approved             Disapproved           Date                   

 

horizontal rule

Material Submitted for Course Approval

 

Overview of BIOL 211 Anatomy and Physiology I As is obvious from the course description, the main function of BIOL 211 Human anatomy and Physiology I has not been University Studies in the pastThis course is taught with an enrollment about 180 students in a large auditorium, ST103. Multiple sections, usually 12-14, of the weekly 2 hour laboratories with 24-26 students are given in a dedicated Anatomy and Physiology laboratory: Stark 217. Almost all laboratory exercises are carried out in groups of 2-4 students. Lecture exams are mostly multiple choice.  Lab exams are short answer practical exams. We have certain content expectations to meet in the preparation of future nurses, health teachers, exercise science practitioners and the like, and we take them very seriously. Despite these realities I think the course is now a valuable and mind-broadening experience, especially because of the laboratory component.   The students see cadavers, look through microscopes at cells and tissues, perform physiological measurements, analyze data and make deductions, handle brains and get a fairly deep understanding of the internal structure and workings of their body.  I think that with some change in our perspective and emphasis we can meet many of the suggested guidelines for University study science courses. 

I suggest making the following changes to the course as it is presently taught to make it meet more of the University Studies outcomes: 1. Emphasize the historical development of Anatomy and Physiology.  2. Put more emphasis on the scientific method in lecture.   3. Do more of the physiology labs from the "make a hypothesis and design an experiment to test it" perspective. 4. Discuss the structure of the human body from the perspective of Human Evolution.  5. Emphasize organizational principles such as the hierarchy of organizational complexity, complementarity of structure and function and mechanisms of homeostasis throughout the course.  6. Introduce some exercises in which students have to access and evaluate anatomy or physiology-relevant information from the internet or library.

Course Syllabus Link for BIOL 211 Anatomy and Physiology I (On the syllabus the University-related sections have been highlighted in red)

Syllabus - Outcomes Grid

Topics: Outcomes (Lc = lecture, Lb =Lab, Lt = Literature search)
  1
Understand
scientific
approaches
2
Apply
scientific
methods
3
Use
scientific
reasoning
4
Independent,
collaborative
learning
5
Search for
additional
information
6
Evaluate
scientific
information
7
Recognize,
correct mis-
conceptions
Introduction to course, history, human evolution

Lc

Lc

Lc

Lc

 

Lc

Lc

The Scientific Method

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lb

 

Lc

Lc/ Lb

Organization of the body

Lc/Lb

Lc

Lc

 

 

Lc

Lc/Lb

Cells, Tissues, Organs

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lb

 

LcLb

Lc/Lb

Basic Chemistry

Lc

 

Lc

 

 

Lc

Lc

Histology

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lb

 

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Integumentary system

Lc/Lb

Lc

Lb

Lb

 

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Skeletal system

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lb

 

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Muscular system

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lb

Lb

 

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Nervous system

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Lb

 

Lc/Lb

Lc/Lb

Literature search assignment

 

 

 

Lt

Lt

Lt

 

 

1. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to
understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural sciences.

The lectures on the scientific method and the history of A&P will give the students a good background to understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural sciences. All the other lectures and labs will be taught from this point of view. 

 

2. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to
apply those methods to solve problems that arise in the natural sciences.

In addition to the lectures on the scientific method, the three physiology laboratories should be excellent educational experiences in applying these methods.

 

3. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to
use inductive reasoning, mathematics, or statistics to solve problems in natural science.

The used of inductive reasoning will be taught in the history and scientific method lectures.   All physiology laboratory exercises will involve graphing of results.  The muscle simulation and reaction time experiments will include rudimentary statistical analysis (comparison of means).

 

4. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to
engage in independent and collaborative learning.

All the laboratory exercises are done in groups of two to four students.  The students get lots of practice in collaborative learning and seem to enjoy it.  Independent learning will be emphasized in the literature search component of the course.

 

5. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to
identify, find, and use the tools of information science as it relates to natural science.

The literature search component of the course is designed to satisfy this objective.

 

6. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to
critically evaluate both source and content of scientific information.

The literature search component of the course is designed to satisfy this objective.  I think all the background information that students learn from the lectures and labs also contribute to their ability do do critical evaluations.  The students learn lots of basic chemistry, cell biology, anatomy and physiology that should enable them to think better.

 

7. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to
recognize and correct scientific misconceptions.

All parts of the course help the students to recognize their many scientific misconceptions.  They learn what enzymes and proteins are and are not.  They learn what makes up a hair, how cancers are formed and grow, that bone is a living tissue and many other basic things about their body.  I think that the inclusion of historical information and an evolutionary perspective in the course will also be valuable input with regards to changing some of their misconceptions.

 

Revised Syllabus: Biology 211 - Anatomy and Physiology I - F2001 

 

Items directly related to University Studies are highlighted in red and underlined.
(Disclaimer: Class procedures and dates in this syllabus are tentative. I will try to adhere to all of them, but problems in handling this large class may necessitate changes. I will notify you of any necessary changes as soon as possible.)
Lecture and lab instructor: Dr. Dave Dapkus
Office: Pasteur 215D Office Hours: MWF 9-10 and 12-1; T 2-4; R 10-12 or by appointment. Communication: phone: 457-5274; e-mail: ddapkus @winona.edu
Rooms: Lecture - Stark 103; Lab - Stark 217.
Texts: PLEASE PUT YOUR NAMES IN ALL TEXTS AND NOTEBOOKS so they can be returned if you lose them. Required Text: 1) Saladin: Anatomy and Physiology, 2ed.
Course objectives: This course is the first of a two semester sequence intended primarily for Nursing, H&HP and PE&R and students. The course also meets the University Studies requirement.
In the lecture part of this course we will first study some basic background material: the history of Anantomy and Physiology, the scientific method, Human evolution as it relates to Human anatomy, the organization of the human body, basic inorganic and organic chemistry, cell structure and function and tissues. Then we will use this knowledge to study the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. In laboratory we will begin with the study of the skeletal system using skeletons, isolated bones and skulls. Next we will learn to use the microscope and learn to identify the commonly-occurring tissues on photomicrographs, models and using the microscope. An exercise on osmosis and diffusion will illustrate the use of the scientific method.   Then we will study the muscular system using models, computer-generated diagrams with the ADAM program and cadavers. Another computer simulation of muscle contraction will be used to further illustrate the design of scientific experiments.  Finally, we will study the Nervous system using ADAM and nervous system models. Nervous system physiology will be illustrated using a computer-driven time measurement system.  Your lab group will learn to use the equipment and then will design and carry out an experiment.
The knowledge you gain in this course will be a foundation for your subsequent understanding of the structure of the body in health and disease. Your educational career will be broadened by the University Studies component of this course.   Another objective is to teach you good study and work habits so that you can succeed in future courses.
Approach to the course: You can succeed in this course if you put in plenty of study time and if you study effectively. I have set up the course content with the idea in mind that you will study at least 6-8 hours per week for best results. More time may be required in the early part of the quarter until you find efficient ways to study. Most students find that the material is not particularly difficult but it is very voluminous. I will talk about study skills from time to time, but I would like to make these initial suggestions: 1) Come to class every day. 2) Take lots of good notes. Review and revise them as soon after class as possible. Read through all your notes every week. 3) Do a preliminary reading of the textbook before coming to the lecture on that subject. 4) Let the Chapter Objectives be your guide for what to learn from the textbook. 5) Find active ways of studying rather than passively "reading over your notes". For example: use flash cards to learn terms; get someone to ask you questions from the notes or textbook Chapter Objectives. 6) As you study for each test make a complete, but brief summary of the important items. Not only will this help you learn the material, but the summary sheets will be helpful in studying for successive exams and the comprehensive final. 7) Consider forming a study group to help you learn the material. 8) Space out several shorter study periods rather than having one long "cram session". 9) Keep a log of what you study and the lengths of your study periods. 10) See me early if you are having trouble.
Laboratory: NO MATERIALS CAN BE REMOVED FROM THE LAB For each laboratory section there will be lab handout that will contain a list of the bones, bone markings, tissues, cells, model parts and muscles you will be required to know. Your job will be to learn all the structures on the list. I will arrange as much open lab study time as possible. During that time handle the materials carefully, put them away when you are done and clean up any mess. Failure to follow these directions may result in shutting down the lab. Try to study lab materials regularly. No one can pass the lab part of the course without studying in the lab outside the lab periods. Study early since the lab tends to be very crowded just before the exam. When you study in lab I have found it very effective to use a quiz format and study with a partner. For example, your partner points out a bone part off the list and asks you to name it. On lab exams you are required to spell all the answers phonetically correct: meaning all the right sounds in the right order. Poor spelling will result in partial or total loss of credit.
Lecture: Please arrive on time and do not talk during the lecture. Please feel free to ask questions during lecture. Let me know if I am going too fast or if you can't hear me.
Attendance: Attendance in lab and lecture is not required, but is very highly recommended, (in the same way that not walking in front of moving cars is highly recommended).
Exams: Dates of lecture and lab exams are given on the schedule. Basically, I don't give any make up lab or lecture exams. If you miss one lecture or lab exam you will be required to take the comprehensive final exam.    If you miss more than one exam you will receive a zero on the second missed exam. Hour lecture exams will consist of 50 multiple choice or short answer, drawing, or fill in the blank questions. Please bring your own scantrons. It is alright with me if you use the other side of the scantron. You are responsible for making correct marks on the scantron. My experience is that the machine always corrects unaltered, dark marks correctly, but sometimes miss-marks erasures. Therefore, make dark marks between the lines and erase any changed marks thoroughly. If you are unsure of any erasures please put a note at the center bottom, not edge of the sheet such as "# 2,6,16" and I will check them for you. Otherwise I will record what the machine says.
Questions will be drawn mainly from the lecture material. The chapter objectives are meant to point you to the relevant sections of the textbook to study.
Lab exams will be practical exams: There will be a labeled specimen with a question on a card for you to answer. Each exam will consist of 25 questions and will be worth 50 points.
Dr. Thompson’s labs will be studying the same topics in lab, but the lists of assigned terms and weekly assignments will be somewhat different. Dr. Thompson’s class and this one will take different lab tests at different times.
Grading: Grading will be based on a curved total point distribution. Points will be assigned as follows: Hour exams I, II, III, IV - 50 points each. Final exam - Part A Hour exam V - 50 points; Part B Optional Comprehensive final exam. Total points: Lecture: 250 points (5X50). Lab: 200 points (4X50 point practicals) plus any small assignments given in lecture or lab. Additional library/ research assignment: 25 points.  People above a grade line will receive that grade. Students just below the grade borderline (within approximately two percent) who took the comprehensive final exam will be individually evaluated. For these students I will consider how well they did on the optional comprehensive final exam. This way of grading puts the responsibility on you and means that you should study very hard for the final exam, especially if your grade might be near a borderline. I reserve the right to raise or lower a students grade by up to 10 points based on their behavior in lecture and lab. Negative behaviors to be considered will be talking or other disruptive behavior in lecture, non-attendance, leaving early or unsafe activities in lab. Examples of positive behaviors would be good attendance in lecture and lab and helpful, cooperative, consistent participation and study in lab.

Revised Anatomy and Physiology I Syllabus

Lecture topics:

Topics:

Outcomes:
1
Understand
scientific
approaches
2
Apply
scientific
methods
3
Use
scientific
reasoning
4
Independent,
collaborative
learning
5
Search for
additional
information
6
Evaluate
scientific
information
7
Recognize,
correct mis-
conceptions
Introduction to course

History of Anatomy, Use of cadaver dissection,Development of light and electron microscopes, History of physiology, Development of homeostasis concept, Complementarity of structure and function, Evolution concept, Human evolutionary history, Evolution of the skeleton, Human vestigial organs, Organization of the body, Heirarchy of structural complexity

X

X

X

X

X

X

Scientific method;   Hypothetico-deductive method

X

X

X

X

X

Basic chemistry

X

X

X

X

Cell Anatomy, Cell physiology

X

X

X

X

X

Histology

X

X

X

X

X

Integumentary system

X

X

X

X

Skeletal Anatomy, Skeletal Physiology

X

X

X

X

X

Muscular Anatomy, Muscular Physiology

X

X

X

X

Nervous Anatomy, Nervous Physiology

X

X

X

X

X

Laboratory Exercises:
Skeletal I

X

X

X

X

X

X

Skeletal II

X

X

X

X

X

X

Use of Microscope

X

X

X

X

X

Histology I

X

X

X

X

X

X

Histology II

X

X

X

X

X

X

Osmosis/diffusion lab

How does concentration gradient effect the rate of osmosis?

X

X

X

X

X

Muscular Anatomy I

X

X

X

X

X

X

Muscular Anatomy II

X

X

X

X

X

X

Muscular physiology lab

Computer simulation of muscle contraction: effect of load and frequency of stimulation on tension.

X

X

X

X

X

X

Brain and spinal cord anatomy

X

X

X

X

X

X

Sense organ anatomy

X

X

X

X

X

X

Nervous physiology Lab

Factors affecting reaction time to be designed and carried out by student groups.

X

X

X

X

X

X

Additional literature search requirement:

Choose an Anatomy or Physiology-related topic of interest to you such as osteoporosis.   Find a relevant source from the internet, a book, a scientific journal and a popular magazine.  Write a short critique of the type of information you found from each source.  What is your impression of the reliability of each source?  On what basis did you make this judgement?

 

X

 

X

 

X