Approved by Faculty Senate.

University Studies Course Proposal

Department of Program: Business Administration

Course Number: 220

Course Title: Introduction to Business Statistics

Course Description: Elementary business statistics including descriptive measures, elementary probabi1ity, sampling of distributions, and statistical inference. Prerequisites:

MATH 110, MATH 120, MATH 140 or instructor's permission. Grade only.

This is an existing course previously approved by AlC2: Yes

Department Contact Person: Marzie Astani E-mail:

Marzie.Astani@winona.edu

The proposed course is designed to satisfy the requirements in:

II. C. Mathematics/Statistics OR Critical Analysis Flag

Mathematics/Statistics Flag Outcomes and Course Requirements

As required in point I of the approval process, the following material addresses the two outcomes listed for Mathematics/Statistics Flag courses and documents course content and learning activities relevant to these course outcomes.

a. Practice the correct application of mathematical or statistical models that are appropriate to their prerequisite knowledge of those areas

Approximately 40% of the student's course grade is made up of points earned either through written/oral solution to assigned statistical problems or the application of statistical models by using software packages for decision making. Students are required to solve a number of statistics problems for each subject discussed in class. Students are asked to explain the solutions to the problems in class. They are also given pop-quizzes on the topics discussed.

b. Make proper use of modern mathematical or statistical methods appropriate to their level of prerequisite knowledge, to include, if statistics is used in a substantive way, the use of a statistical package with graphics capability when appropriate.

A number of computer projects are assigned throughout the semester, which allow student to use statistical software package to model a business situation and make decision. The graphic capability of the software packages is used to depict the business situations.

Sample Sy1labus

DIS 220 Business statistics

Instructor                                  Phone

Office Hours                             E-mail

Typical Text: Introduction to Business Statistics

University Studies: Mathematics/Statistics Flag

This course satisfies the three semester-hour requirement of the Mathematics/Statistics Flag component in the University Studies Program. As such, it seeks to provide students taking this course the opportunity to achieve the following outcomes:

a. Practice the correct application of mathematical or statistical models that are appropriate to their prerequisite knowledge of those areas

b. Make proper use of modem mathematical or statistical methods appropriate to their level of prerequisite knowledge, to include, if statistics is used in a substantive way, the use of a statistical package with graphics capability when appropriate.

Grading

Each student is given a problem set each week composed of a number of problems. Students are required to solve these problems and bring the solutions to the class. During the class period students present the solution to the problems and explain how they arrived at the solutions. This constitutes 10% of their grade (class participation). In addition to these statistics assignment other statistics problems are assigned from the textbook for practicing statistical methods and techniques. To evaluate students learning of the topics a number of pop-quizzes are given in class, which accounts for 15% of student's grade. Computer projects that allow application of statistical models for business situations through the use of statistical software packages constitute 15% of students' grade. The remaining 60% of the student's grade come from the three tests. A 90-80-70 grading scale will be used.

Class Activities and Corresponding US Objectives

The current text for DIS 220, Introduction to Business Statistics, consists of basic concepts in descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Class period is spent on lecture on statistical topics and examples, pop-quizzes, and students' presentation of assigned problems (class participation). These activities touch on the two objectives of the US program.

Lectures

PART ONE

A Preview of Business Statistics

Descriptive Versus Inferential Statistics

Types of Variables and Scales of Measurement

Visual Description of Data

Introduction

The Data Array and the Frequency Distribution

Constructing a Frequency Distribution

The Stem and Leaf Display

Popular Graphical Methods

Statistical Description of Data

Introduction

Measures of Central Tendency

Measures of Dispersion

Additional Dispersion Topics: Chebyshev's Theorem, The Empirical Rule, and Standardized Data

Descriptive Statistics from Grouped Data

PART Two

Probability

Basic Concept: Terms and Approaches

Unions and Intersections of Events

Addition Rules for Probability

Multiplication Rules for Probability

Bayes' Theorem and the Revision of Probabilities

Counting: Permutations and Combinations

 

Discrete Probability Distributions

Introduction

The Binomial Distribution

The Hypergeometric Distribution

The Poisson Distribution

Continuous Probability Distributions

The Normal Distribution

Using the Standardized Normal Distribution Table

PART THREE

Sampling and Sampling Distribution

Sampling Methods

A Preview of Sampling Distribution

Sampling Distribution of the Mean

Sampling Distribution of the Proportion

Sampling Distribution when the Population is Infinite

Estimation from Sample data

Point Estimates

Interval Estimates

Confidence Interval Estimates for the Mean: a Known & Unknown

Confidence Interval Estimates for the Population Proportion

PART  four   

Hypothesis Tests Involving a Sample Mean or Proportion

Hypothesis Testing Basic Procedures

Testing a Mean: Population Standard Deviation Known & Unknown

Testing a Proportion

P-values and Computer-Assisted Hypothesis Testing

Confidence Intervals and Hypothesis Testing

The Power of a Hypothesis Test

Hypothesis Tests Involving Two Sample Means or proportions

The t-Test for Comparing the Means of Two Independent Samples

The z-Test for Comparing the Means of Two Independent Samples

Comparing Two Means when the Samples Are Dependent

Comparing Two Sample Proportions