Approved by Faculty Senate

Chemistry 100: Chemistry Appreciation (Lecture only - 3 s.h.)

The purpose of this introductory chemistry course is to provide students with the knowledge to
understand our world/universe from the viewpoint of fundamental chemical principles and to
introduce them to many of the tools used in scientific inquiry which have enabled us to enhance
our understanding of the natural world. The studies of chemistry involve the study of matter and
the transformations it undergoes. The applications of these studies will provide students with an
enhanced understanding of many phenomena which affect our daily lives, such as the synthesis,
purification and mode of action of many common chemicals, including gasoline, antacids and polymers.

Catalog Description:

Selected chemistry concepts presented as lecture-demonstrations for students who wish to gain an
appreciation of the chemical world. Meets the Natural Science requirement under the Arts & Sciences
Core of the University Studies program. Not intended as preparation for other chemistry courses.
Does not preclude taking any other chemistry courses for credit. No laboratory. No prerequisite.
Not open to students with credit in higher numbered chemistry courses. Offered each semester.

This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural sciences;

    Requirements: Students are taught the scientific method. Many different real world problems
                                are presented and students are expected to learn how to apply the scientific
                                method and the principles of chemistry to solving and understanding chemical phenomena.

   Activities:        Students are provided with many opportunities to apply chemistry concepts. Activities
                                include classroom demonstrations, in-class problem solving sessions, and instructor-led
                                and group discussion. One example involves the use of a conductivity apparatus to
                               determine whether various materials and solutions will conduct electricity. By testing a
                               number of different materials, the students as a group identify the characteristics of those
                               materials which will Alight up@ the bulb. They then use that information to predict whether
                               untested materials should also conduct electricity.

b. apply those methods to solve problems that arise in the natural sciences;

    Requirements:      Students are expected to apply the methods and the techniques of problem solving in
                               many varieties of science and chemistry phenomena.

   Activities:       Students apply various techniques such as pattern recognition and trend analysis to
                               solve many problems. Two demonstrations of periodic trends are easily performed.
                              One demonstration involves the reaction of water with several metals from the same
                              group on the period table. A second involves the reaction of halogens with halide salts.
                              The students correctly note that there are trends within each group and are able to
                              predict which untested elements will give the strongest reactions.

c. use inductive reasoning, mathematics, or statistics to solve problems in natural science;

    Requirements:    Solving problems in chemistry related phenomena invariably involve the use of inductive
                             reasoning and mathematics (and/or statistics). Students are presented with many problems
                             and laboratory exercises that require these skills in solving the problems.

  Activities:     Activities such as homework assignments, in-class exercises, and demonstration reports
                             require inductive reasoning and mathematical skills. One example of a common problem
                             which occurs in science is the separation of a mixture. The students work in small groups
                             to separate a number of plastic pieces into various categories and then identify the steps
                             used in that separation, which involves using differences in various physical characteristics.
                             These general principles are then applied to a mixture of three solids and students devise
                             a separation scheme which will allow them to separate the mixture into the three pure
                             substances. Their scheme is then tested in class.

d. engage in independent and collaborative learning;

    Requirements:  The class as a whole performs and observes the demonstration and gathers a single data
                           set. Small group discussions are encouraged in the initial stages of analyzing what has been
                           observed. The entire class then discusses the demonstration and the explanation in a
                           collaborative manner. However, students are required to submit all assignments and written
                           work independently.

    Activities:   Some demonstration-lecture period activities include having students work in small groups
                           to develop an explanation for the phenomenon which they have just observed before the
                           entire class discusses the phenomenon. Other lecture activities include group discussions
                           on conceptual applications to real world problems in natural science.

e. identify, find, and use the tools of information science as it relates to natural science;

   Requirements:  Students are required to employ many tools of information science, such as searching
                           scientific/chemistry journals/references in both non-electronic and electronic formats,
                            to gather information which will allow them to understand issues and to propose
                           solutions to problems in natural science.

Activities:            There are Aspecial topic@ writing assignments required each semester. Students
                           identify a specific topic from among several possibilities and consult appropriate
                           sources for relevant information on chemical and physical properties as well as
                           on economic and societal effects. They are required to use both print and electronic
                           sources for their papers. Usage of such tools of information science enhances the
                           students
' ability in investigative techniques in different areas of natural science. In
                           recent years the general topics have included the composition of a commercial
                           product, the effect of a particular area of chemistry on the economy and on society
                          and the biography of an element of the student
's choice.

f. critically evaluate both source and content of scientific information; and
    Requirements:  Classroom demonstrations and lecture assignments are designed for critical evaluation
                            by students. Chemical concepts are tested against the experimental phenomena
                            demonstrated in the lecture-demonstration periods.

   Activities:    Students are assessed based on their performance on quizzes, tests, demonstration
                            and activity reports and special topic writing assignments. These activities are designed
                            to allow students the opportunity to critically evaluate both source and content of
                            chemical information.

g. recognize and correct scientific misconceptions.

   Requirements:  Many chemical concepts (such as the three-dimensional shapes of molecules) are
                           difficult and abstract. Students are taught to recognize misconceptions in chemical
                           concepts and how to revise and correct with proper perspectives.

    Activities:   Students often think of molecules as flat entities which have all of the atoms arranged
                            in a straight line or in a plane and they find it very difficult to picture molecules as
                           three-dimensional structures. In the classroom students work with molecular model
                           kits and build actual three-dimensional models of molecules, which clearly show the
                           actual arrangement of atoms in the molecules. This exercise is one example of
                           providing students with opportunities to critically evaluate and demystify chemical
                           misconceptions in atomic and molecular structures.

Sample Syllabus (will vary from instructor to instructor)

WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

Chemistry 100 - Chemistry Appreciation
Fall Semester, 2000
Webpage: http://course1.winona.edu/chemistry/chemfaculty

Instructor: Chemistry Faculty (PA 31**, 457-52**)

Course Purpose: The purpose of this introductory chemistry course is to provide students with
the knowledge to understand our world/universe from the viewpoint of fundamental chemical principles
and to introduce them to many of the tools used in scientific inquiry, which have enabled us to enhance
our understanding of the natural world. The studies of chemistry involve the study of matter and the
transformations it undergoes. The applications of these studies will provide students with an enhanced
understanding of many phenomena which affect our daily lives, such as the synthesis, purification and
mode of action of many common chemicals, including gasoline, antacids and polymers. Successful
completion of this course will satisfy the Natural Science requirement under the Arts & Sciences
Core of the University Studies program.

Course Description: Chemistry Appreciation (3 s.h.)
Selected chemistry concepts presented as lecture-demonstrations for students who wish to gain an
appreciation of the chemical world. Meets the Natural Science requirement under the Arts & Sciences
Core of the University Studies program. Not intended as preparation for other chemistry courses. Does
not preclude taking any other chemistry courses for credit. No laboratory. No prerequisite. Not open to
students with credit in higher numbered chemistry courses. Offered each semester.

 

Lecture: Sect 01 T R 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. PA 305
                Sect 02 T R 2:00 - 3:20 p.m. PA 305

 

Text: Chemistry in Focus, 2nd Edition, Nivaldo J. Tro, Brooks/Cole Publishing Company, 2000

Other:

          1.      Demonstration Sheets for Chemistry 100
          2.       Periodic Table
          3.      A three-ring binder for Chemistry in Focus
          4.      A three-ring binder or other suitable folder for completed demonstration report
                   sheets and other course materials

 Completion of this course will include requirements and learning activities that promote
your abilities to achieve the following Outcomes:

a. to understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural sciences;
b. to apply those methods to solve problems that arise in the natural sciences;
c. to use inductive reasoning, mathematics, or statistics to solve problems in natural science;
d. to engage in independent and collaborative learning;
e. to identify, find, and use the tools of information science as it relates to natural science;
f. to critically evaluate both source and content of scientific information; and
g. to recognize and correct scientific misconceptions.

Course Details and Requirements: Course Details/Requirements/Activities:

In order to do well or pass the course, students are expected to:

1. attend and participate in lecture-demonstration periods,
        [Outcomes a, b, c, g]

2. complete and turn in all required assignments,
        [Outcomes a, b, c, d, e, f, g]

3. read the assigned chapters,
        [Outcomes a, b, c, d]

4. complete and submit all assignments, including the special topic
        writing assignments, using relevant information from scientific
        literature both in the library and in electronic media,
        [Outcomes d, e, f, g] and

5. pass the quizzes, tests and final exam.
        [Outcomes a, b, c, d].

Classes:           The demonstrations of chemical phenomena presented during class and their
                           explanations along with text assignments provide the body of the course.
                           Theories will be introduced as needed to help explain the phenomena.
                           Therefore, it is expected that the student will attend every class period.

Assignments:   Written assignments on special topics and reading assignments will be given
                           during the course of the semester. Assignments will be announced in class and
                           also published on the web. Supplementary handouts and reading materials may
                           also be distributed during the course of the term.

Notebook:    A three-ring binder or other suitable folder should be used to contain all demonstration
                           and activity report sheets, whether graded or not, tests, quizzes, assignments, class and
                           reading notes, and other course materials. These will be collected and examined by the
                           instructor at least once during the semester.

Demonstration and Activity Report Sheets:
Each student will complete a report sheet for each demonstration or activity.
However, not all of the report sheets will be collected and graded. At the
beginning of the semester, envelopes containing slips labeled either A yes@ or
A no@ will be randomly numbered in lecture. At the end of each lecture period
one envelope will be opened. If it contains a A yes, @ the report sheet(s) for that
day will be collected and graded. Each day's sheet(s) will earn a maximum of 20
points, no matter how many demonstrations were performed on that day.
Demonstration and activity report sheets will be graded on the basis of the student's
description of the demonstration or activity, completeness, the studen's understanding
of the demonstration or activity, and her/his explanation of the phenomenon examined
in the demonstration or activity.

 

Quizzes:
There will be several quizzes during the semester. Quizzes will generally be approximately
ten minutes in length and may be given either at the beginning or at the end of the lecture
period. There will be NO make-up quizzes during the semester. There will be one make-up
quiz which will be given at the end of the term. The lowest quiz score will be dropped.

Tests:
There will be two tests during the semester plus a comprehensive final exam. Tests may be
either demonstration-type or written. The two regular tests will be given during the sixth and
eleventh weeks of the term. Exact test dates will be announced at least one week in advance.

Final Exam:
The final exam for the course will be comprehensive. However, more emphasis will be placed
on material covered after the second test. The time for the final exam is:

Sect 01 (T R 9:30 lecture) Wednesday, December 13, 2000, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Sect 02 (T R 2:00 lecture) Tuesday, December 12, 2000, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Marking Distribution:
Demonstration Sheets/Special Topics 40%
Tests 30% (15% each)
Quizzes 10%
Final Exam 20% (See time listed above.)

Course Grades: These assessments will give your level of achievement relative to
                                 Outcomes a to g.

                                A 90 %
                                B 78%
                                C 65%
                                D 50%
                                F < 50 %

Tentative Course Outline

 

 

Topics

Chapters
Scientific Method, History of Chemistry 1
Measurements and Observations 2
States of Matter, Mixtures, Pure Substances 1, 2
Elements and Atoms, Atomic Structure, Periodic Trends 3
Molecules and Compounds, Bonding, Ions in Solution 4, 5
Chemical Reactions 5
Light and Color 7
Nuclear Chemistry 8
Energy and Society, Sources and Uses of Energy 9, 10
Organic Compounds and Polymers 6, 15
Acids and Bases 13
Oxidation and Reduction, Electricity 14
Air, Water 11, 12
Chemistry in Everyday Life: Household Products, Food, Medicine, etc. 15, 17, 18
Biochemistry 16

 

 

The study of these chemistry concepts involves purposeful readings of your textbook, your attendance
and participation in lecture-demonstration sessions, and completion of all assignments. Successful
completion of studies of these lecture topics will promote your ability to achieve Outcomes a to g.