Approved by Faculty Senate

Chemistry 212: Principles of Chemistry I (Lecture and Lab - 4 s.h.)

The purpose of this general chemistry course is to provide students with the knowledge to understand and
appreciate our world/universe from the viewpoint of chemistry principles and with the tools to apply the
methods of scientific inquiry (along with the chemistry knowledge) toward an enhanced understanding of
the natural world. The studies of chemistry involve the study of matter and the transformations it
undergoes utilizing the scientific method of discovery, experiment, and conclusion. The applications of
these studies will provide students with an enhanced understanding of such everyday applications as the
chemical reactions in the living cell, the common chemicals used in our homes, and the connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties.

Catalog Description:

An in-depth study of the principles of chemistry including stoichiometry, atomic structure, the chemical bond, gases, and solutions. Organic and inorganic examples are used when appropriate throughout the course. Laboratory and lecture are coordinated. Prerequisite: high school intermediate algebra or concurrent enrollment in MATH 120 or a higher-numbered mathematics course. Meets the Natural Science requirement under the Arts & Sciences Core of the University Studies program. Offered yearly.

 

This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural sciences;

Requirements: Students are taught the scientific method. Many different real world problems are presented and students are expected to learn how to apply the scientific method and the principles of chemistry to solving and understanding chemistry-related phenomena.

Activities: Students are provided with many opportunities to apply the chemistry concepts. Activities include in-class/out-of-class problem solving sessions, one-on-one tutorials, instructor-led and group discussions, and laboratory exercises. A particular example is the determination of densities of various materials by measuring mass and volume of known solids and liquids, and then applying the techniques in identifying an unknown salt solution by investigating the relationship between density and concentration.

 

b. apply those methods to solve problems that arise in the natural sciences;

Requirements: Students are expected to apply the methods and the techniques of problem solving in many varieties of science and chemistry phenomena.

Activities: Students apply various techniques, such as pattern recognition and trend analysis, to solve many problems during laboratories and class assignments.

 

c. use inductive reasoning, mathematics, or statistics to solve problems in natural science;

Requirements: Solving problems in chemistry related phenomena invariably involve the use of inductive reasoning and mathematics (and/or statistics). Students are presented with many problems and laboratory exercises that require these skills in solving the problems.

Activities: Activities such as homework assignments, in-class exercises, and laboratory experiments and reports require inductive reasoning and mathematical skills.

 

d. engage in independent and collaborative learning;

Requirements: Students are expected to work in pairs to collect several experimental data sets. Although they are encouraged to discuss data analysis and interpretation in a collaborative manner, students are required to hand in reports that are written in an independent manner.

Activities: Students work in pairs in data collection. Analysis can be done collaboratively but laboratory reports must be written individually. Additional collaborative learning is accomplished when all students in a class share and analyze the data from the entire class. Some lecture activities include group discussions on conceptual applications to real world problems in natural science. Often students are given a problem in class and are asked to solve the problem in a group setting.

 

e. identify, find, and use the tools of information science as it relates to natural science;

Requirements: Students are required to employ many tools of information science, such as searching scientific and chemistry-specific journals or references in both non-electronic and electronic formats, to elucidate, decipher and solve problems in natural science.

Activities: Many laboratory exercises require students to search for relevant information on physical and chemical properties before, during and after the experiments, for comparison with experimental data. Usage of such tools of information science enhances the students= ability in investigative techniques in different areas of natural science. Non-electronic and electronic resources are available readily. One example involves the visualization of three-dimensional molecular structure, a concept that is difficult to understand on a flat sheet of paper or when drawn on a chalkboard. Sources and tools are available in the form of CD-Roms, web sites, and software programs to aid in this understanding.

 

f. critically evaluate both source and content of scientific information; and

Requirements: Laboratory experiments and lecture assignments are designed for critical evaluation by students. Chemical concepts are tested against experimental data collected by students.

Activities: Included with laboratory exercises and class assignments, students are assessed based on their performance on quizzes, tests, and laboratory reports. These activities are designed to allow students the opportunity to critically evaluate both source and content of chemical information. One specific assignment asks the students to search the popular press for articles related to chemistry and to write a description of the article evaluating its validity and relation to chemistry. Also, in the laboratory, students often compare their data to literature values, thus, evaluating their data.

 

g. recognize and correct scientific misconceptions.

Requirements: Many chemical concepts (such as electronic and molecular structures) are difficult and abstract. Students are taught to recognize misconceptions in chemical concepts and how to revise and correct with proper perspectives.

Activities: Laboratory experiments such as determination of atomic and molecular spectra give students the opportunity to critically evaluate and demystify chemical misconceptions in atomic and molecular structures. The popular press assignment mentioned in f. above sometimes exemplifies scientific misconceptions that the general public promotes.

 

This course also satisfies the laboratory requirement in the Natural Sciences and will additionally provide students with the opportunity to practice scientific inquiry through hands-on investigations and to analyze and report the results of those investigations.

Requirements: Chemistry is a laboratory science that requires active learning. As such, students are required to perform and complete weekly laboratory exercises. This laboratory requirement will give students practical and hands-on experience of basic chemical analysis, application of chemistry concepts, and the general understanding of the scientific method.

Activities: The weekly laboratory exercises include hands-on activities such as: pre-lab studies and preparations (reviewing and searching of relevant concepts and information before doing the actual experiments), the learning, practicing, and performance of experimental techniques, collecting data with modern instrumentation, analyzing results, interpreting or discussing data (relative to models), making conclusions, and complementing these activities with the writing of a laboratory report. These hands-on investigations will give students an enhanced appreciation and understanding of the chemical universe.

Sample Syllabus (will vary from instructor to instructor)

WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

Chemistry 212 - Sample Fall Session - 2000

Web page: http://course1.winona.edu/cmiertschin/

Instructor: Chemistry Faculty (PA 31**, 457-52**)

Course Purpose: The purpose of this general chemistry course is to provide students with the knowledge to
understand and appreciate our world/universe from the viewpoint of chemistry principles and with the tools to
apply the methods of scientific inquiry (along with the chemistry knowledge) toward an enhanced understanding
of the natural world. The studies of chemistry involve the study of matter and the transformations it undergoes
utilizing the scientific method of discovery, experiment, and conclusion. The applications of these studies will
provide students with an enhanced understanding of such everyday applications as the chemical reactions in the
living cell, the common chemicals used in our homes, and the connection between microscopic structure and
macroscopic properties.

 

Course Description: Principles of Chemistry I

An in-depth study of the principles of chemistry including stoichiometry, atomic structure, the chemical bond,
gases, and solutions. Organic and inorganic examples are used when appropriate throughout the course.
Laboratory and lecture are coordinated. Prerequisite: high school intermediate algebra or concurrent
enrollment in MATH 120 or a higher-numbered mathematics course. Meets the Natural Science
requirement under the Arts & Sciences Core of the University Studies program. Offered yearly.

Lectures: M W F 9:00 - 9:50 a.m. PA 305

Labs: T 9:30 - 11:50 a.m. PA 308

Text: "Chemistry," Zumdahl, 5th ed., Houghton Mifflin Co., 2000.

Lab Manual: WSU Principles of Chemistry Laboratory Manual

SAFETY GOGGLES ARE MANDATORY IN THE LABORATORY

Completion of this course will include requirements and learning activities that promote your abilities
to achieve the following Outcomes:

a. to understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural sciences;

b. to apply those methods to solve problems that arise in the natural sciences;

c. to use inductive reasoning, mathematics, or statistics to solve problems in natural science;

d. to engage in independent and collaborative learning;

e. to identify, find, and use the tools of information science as it relates to natural science;

f. to critically evaluate both source and content of scientific information; and

g. to recognize and correct scientific misconceptions.

Also this course satisfies the laboratory requirement in the Natural Sciences and will additionally provide you the opportunity to practice scientific inquiry through hands-on investigations and to analyze and report the results of those investigations.

 

Course Details/Requirements/Activities:

In order to do well or pass the course, the students are expected to:

1. attend and participate in lecture-discussion-tutorial sessions, [Outcomes a, b, c, g]

2. complete and turn in assigned laboratory studies/reports,
[Outcomes a, b, c, d, e, f, g]

3. read assigned chapters and attempt text problems,
[Outcomes a, b, c, d]

4. prepare for experiments by completing pre-lab exercises using relevant information from scientific literature both in the library and in electronic media,
[Outcome e, f, g] and

5. pass, in general, quizzes and tests.
[Outcomes a, b, c, d].

The final exam will cover the whole course, the three one-hour tests will cover only certain
chapters and/or sections, and the quizzes will cover certain selected topic(s). Most experiments
are to be done in pairs, but lab-reports must be individually written. Lab-reports are generally due the following lab period. Laboratory experiments can only be excused with official medical notification or with appropriate official WSU sanctioned events. There will not be any test/quiz make-ups.

 

 

 

Marking Distribution

Date(s)

Quizzes

10%

TBA

Labs

20%

See schedule

Homework

10%

TBA

Tests (3)

15% each

TBA

Final Examination

15%

December 12, 2000

These assessments will give your level of achievement relative to Outcomes a to g.

 

Grading Scale: A ( 89%) , B (77-88%), C (65-76%), D (50-64%), E (<50%).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lecture Schedule

Chapter & Title Topics
1. Chemical Foundations Units of measurement, math review
2. Atoms, Molecules and Ions Atoms, molecules, ions, periodic table intro., nomenclature
3. Stoichiometry The mole, molar mass, chemical equations, limiting reactant
Test #1 Tentative Date - Wednesday, September 27, 2000
4. Chemical Reactions Types of reactions, solutions, molarity
5. Gases Gas Laws, partial pressures, kinetic molecular theory
6. Thermochemistry Energy, enthalpy, calorimetry
Test #2 Tentative Date - Friday, October 27, 2000
7. Atomic Structure and Periodicity Line spectra, electrons, orbitals, periodic table
8. Bonding: General Concepts Types of bonding, basic bonding theories
Test #3 Tentative Date - Monday, November 20, 2000
10. Liquids and Solids Intermolecular forces, phase diagrams
11. Properties of Solutions Solubility, colligative properties
4. Solubility -- time permitting -- Solubility Rules
Final Exam Date - Tuesday, December 12, 2000

 

 

The studies of these chemistry concepts involve purposeful readings of your textbook, your attendance and participation
in lecture, discussion, and tutorial sessions, and completion of homework assignments. The lecture material is also complemented by in-class chemical demonstrations and simulations, video media, computer visualizations (molecular
modeling and graphical interpretations), and web or internet supplements. Furthermore, these chemistry concepts are supplemented with hands-on laboratory exercises. Successful completion of studies of these lecture topics will
promote your ability to achieve Outcomes a to g.

SAFETY GOGGLES ARE MANDATORY IN THE LABORATORY 

 

 

Lab Schedule

Date Experiment
Aug. 29, 30 Computer graphing assignment **No pre-lab questions**
Sept. 5, 6 Lab Check-in & Orientation

The Laboratory Balance: Mass Determinations (p. 17)

Computer Assistance with graphing

Sept. 12, 13 Density Determinations (p. 37) Additional Data Tables
Sept. 19, 20 Stoichiometry Determinations: Choice III (p. 53)
Sept. 26, 27 The Preparation of Common Alum from Scrap Aluminum (p. 67)
Oct. 3, 4 Hydrates (p. 91)
Oct. 10, 11 -- NO LAB --
Oct. 17, 18 Molar Mass of a Volatile Liquid (p. 75)
Oct. 24, 25 The Enthalpy of Formation of Magnesium Oxide (p. 83)
Oct. 31, Nov. 1 Atomic Spectroscopy (all choices) (p. 99)
Nov. 7, 8 Molecular Structures and Shapes (p. 119) ** No pre-lab questions **
Nov. 14, 15 Solubility of a Salt (p. 137) Supplemental Data Table
Nov. 21, 22 -- NO LAB -- Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 28, 29 Colligative Properties: Choice I (p. 145)
Dec. 5, 6 Lab check-out
Dec. 12, 13 -- NO LAB -- Final Exam week.

 

Chemistry is a laboratory science that requires active learning. As such, students are required to perform and complete
weekly laboratory exercises. These laboratory studies will teach you the various standard techniques used by chemists
and most other scientists. For example, pipettes are used in many biological, health, and engineering disciplines when a
precisely measured volume of liquid is needed. This laboratory requirement is designed to give you practical and hands-on experience of basic chemical analysis, application of chemistry concepts, and the general understanding of the scientific
method. The weekly laboratory exercises include hands-on activities such as: pre-lab studies and preparations (reviewing
and searching of relevant concepts or information before doing the actual experiments), the learning, practicing, and performance of experimental techniques, collecting data with modern instrumentation, analyzing results, interpreting and discussing data (relative to models), making conclusions, and complementing these activities with the writing of a laboratory report. These hands-on investigations will give you an enhanced appreciation and understanding of the chemical universe. Therefore, the completion of these laboratory studies will promote your ability to achieve Outcomes a to g.

 Additional course information (including lecture outlines) can be accessed via the web page:

http://course1.winona.edu/cmiertschin/