Approved by Faculty Senate

 

 University Studies Course Proposal

 

Department or Program:                       Chemistry

 

Course Number:                        360

 

Semester Hours:                        2

 

Frequency of Offering:              Once per academic year, ~12 students per section, one section.

                                               

Course Title:                             Chemical Information

 

Catalog Description:      A course designed to teach chemical literacy including such skills as learning to find, interpret, and present chemical literature.  Chemical information will be found by on- and off-line searching of databases by computer and by hand-searching print-form reference and primary periodical literature materials.  Students will present chemical information in both written and oral forms.  Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 340 or CHEM 350.  Recommended to be taken prior to 400 level chemistry coursework.  Offered yearly. 

 

This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2:              Yes

 

This is a new course proposal:                                                    No

 

Proposal Category:                                                                    Oral Flag

 

Departmental Contact:                                                               Jamie L. Schneider

 

Email Address:                                                                          jschneider@winona.edu

                                                                                               

Department Approval and Date:                                                 ______2/12/02___________________                                                    

 

Dean’s Recommendation and Date:                                            ________2/13/02_________________                                                                                      

 

USS Recommendation and Date:                                                _________________________                                                                                     

 

A2C2 Recommendation and Date:                                              _________________________

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation and Date:                                 _________________________

 

VPAA Recommendation and Date:                                            _________________________

 

Dean’s Recommendation and Date:                                            _________________________

 

President’s Decision and Date:                                                   _________________________


ORAL COMMUNICATIONS FLAG COURSE PROPOSAL

 

Chemistry 360: Chemical Literature (2 s.h.)

 

A scientific experiment is not complete until the results have been made public through papers and presentations.  Frequent exercises in writing and speaking are a part of the Chemistry curriculum and are critically evaluated by the chemistry faculty.  Chemistry 360 is intended to provide chemistry majors with essential chemical literacy skills necessary for success as a chemist.  Chemistry 360 consists of library searching exercises, writing assignments and oral presentations.  Student use The ACS Style Guide, published by the American Chemical Society, as a resource for directions on the organization of scientific presentations and paper.   The ACS Style Guide includes sections on correct grammar and style and on the accepted formats for citing chemical names, chemical symbols, units, graphs, tables, and references.  Evaluation of the students’ presentation is based on content and organization, visual aids, style and delivery, and overall effectiveness.  The professor and other students in the class (anonymously) critique students' oral presentations and posters.  The results of these critiques are shared with the presenter individually to provide a feedback mechanism for improvement upon subsequent presentations.

 

Catalog Description:      A course designed to teach chemical literacy including such skills as learning to find, interpret, and present chemical literature.  Chemical information will be found by on- and off-line searching of databases by computer and by hand-searching print-form reference and primary periodical literature materials.  Students will present chemical information in both written and oral forms.  Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 340 or CHEM 350.  Recommended to be taken prior to 400 level chemistry coursework.  Offered yearly. 

This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a.   Earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations;

 

Requirements:   Students are expected to give effective oral presentations appropriate to a scientific audience utilizing visual aids.  Each presentation will be critiqued and evaluated based on specific criteria as established in the syllabus and presentation grading rubric.

 

Activities:          Near the middle of the semester, students are required to orally present a personally selected chemical research paper using PowerPoint slides.  At the end of the semester, students are required to present a pre-assigned paper in a poster format.  For the poster presentation, although it contains written material, the students are required to monitor the poster, orally lead the viewer through the poster, and answer questions during a designated poster session time.

 


b.       Understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines;

 

Requirements:   Students are expected to give effective oral presentations appropriate to a scientific audience, in this case, their peers and chemistry faculty.  Through observation of other students’ presentations and presentations by visiting speakers, students should be able to discern between types of presentations from classroom lectures, formal research reports, persuasive talks or speeches to non-scientific audiences.  Student presentations will be geared toward what would be given at a scientific meeting.

 

Activities:          Students will follow acceptable scientific formats and guidelines for scientific speaking.  After each presentation, a question and answer time will be conducted, as is done at most scientific meetings.

 


c.   Adapt their speaking to field-specific audiences;

 

Requirements:   Students are expected to give effective oral presentations appropriate to a scientific audience, in this case, their peers and chemistry faculty.  It will be emphasized that a most important component of public speaking is to speak to and at the level of the audience.

 

Activities:          Students’ presentations will be consistent with the general expectations of audiences in the chemical field including appropriate background information and technical details to keep the audience attentive.

 

d.   Receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement;

 

Requirements:   For each presentation students will be critiqued by both the professor and by other students in the class (anonymously).  Critiques cover content and organization, visual aids, and style and delivery.  The results of these critiques are shared with the presenter individually to provide a feedback mechanism for improvement upon their subsequent presentations.

 

Activities:          Students will complete and submit critique forms for each presentation attended.

 

e.   Make use of the technologies used for research and speaking in the fields; and

 

Requirements:   Students are required to use a computer presentation, such as a PowerPoint presentation.  It is stressed, however, that a backup presentation method is often warranted.  The poster presentation, written paper, and library searches will also utilize technology in their production and display.  The research necessary to prepare the presentation will often utilize the general Internet and specific scientific search databases such as online journals. 

 

Activities:          Students will create presentation-quality visual aids to accompany their oral and poster presentations.  Students will learn how to use a variety of scientific search databases in order to find recent literature pertaining to their presentation topics.  


 

f.        Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

 

Requirements:   Students are required to follow conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation as given in the ACS Style Guide or as common for technical speaking.

 

Activities:          Proper formatting of references, chemical structures, chemical reactions, etc. will be presented in the oral presentation, the poster presentation, the written papers, and the library assignments.

 

Submitted with this proposal is a sample CHEM 360 syllabus, which includes the course description, course outcomes, sample presentation and writing assignments, and sample student critique forms that are ultimately used as grading rubrics.


Welcome To: Chemistry 360 (Chemical Information)

Winona State University, Fall 200_

Dr.  ??

Office: PA 312_ Phone: 457-___

Email: ___@ winona.edu

http://course1.winona.edu/??.htm

 

Office Hours: Please come see me ASAP if you need help!  You can also reach me by phone, email, or written note.  My official office hours are ?? and other times by appointment.  

 

Lecture: ?? at ?? in PA 309.

 

Course Description: A course designed to teach chemical literacy including such skills as learning to find, interpret, and present chemical literature.  Chemical information will be found by on- and off-line searching of databases by computer and by hand-searching print-form reference and primary periodical literature materials.  Students will present chemical information in both written and oral forms. 

 

Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 340 or CHEM 350. 

 

Text: The ACS Style Guide, 2nd ed.; Dodd, J. S.; American Chemical Society: Washington D.C., 1997.

 

References:    Davis, Martha. Scientific Papers and Presentations; Academic Press: San Diego, 1997.

Briscoe, Mary Helen. Preparing Scientific Illustrations, A Guide to Better Posters, Presentation, and Publications, 2nd ed.; Springer: New York, 1996.

 

Course Details: Attendance and participation in lecture are required.  Students are expected to comprehensively read all assigned readings and class handouts.  The class will consist of library searching exercises, written assignments and oral presentations.  Assignments will be due during class according the schedule below and will be worth 20 pts, unless otherwise instructed.  A penalty of 10 % of the total possible points per day will be given for late assignments  (ie. An assignment worth 20 points that is turned in one day late can earn a maximum score of 18).

 

Grading Distribution:                                                 Final Grade Assignments

 

Library Assignments                              80 pts                           89-100                          A

Journal Writing Assignment                    20 pts                           76-88                            B

Article Presentations Assignment           20 pts                           63-75                            C

Poster Presentation Assignment             40 pts                           50-62                            D

Total:                160 pts                          <50                               F

Tentative Class Schedule:

Date

Lecture Topic

Assignment (Due the next class, unless otherwise stated)

 

Syllabus, library tour

Library Assignment

 

Electronic Resources

 

 

Electronic Resources

Electronic Library Assignment

 

Chemical Journals

Article Presentation Assignment

 

Chemical Journals

Journal Writing Assignment

 

Chemical Abstracts

 

 

Chemical Abstracts

Chemical Abstracts Library Assignment

 

Article presentations

Poster Presentation Assignment

 

Research Topics

 

 

Synthesis Literature

Synthesis Library Assignment

 

Poster Discussions

 

 

Poster Presentations

 

Completion of this course will include requirements and learning activities that promote your abilities to achieve the following outcomes:

 

a.       Earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations;

b.       Understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines;

c.       Adapt their speaking to field-specific audiences;

d.       Receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement;

e.       Make use of the technologies used for research and speaking in the fields; and

f.        Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

 

The completion of this course will satisfy two credits toward the Oral Communications flag requirement in the University Studies Program.

 

Course Details/Requirements/Activities:

 

In order to do well or pass the course, students are expected to:

 

1.       Give effective oral presentations, [Outcomes a to f],

2.       Prepare and give a poster presentation, [Outcomes a to f],

3.       Prepare an abstract for a chemistry journal article, [Outcomes d, e, f],

4.       Find chemical information using on- and off-line searching of databases by computer and by hand-searching print-form reference and primary periodical literature materials, [Outcome e, f],

5.       Follow formats of presentation and publication style as recommended by the ACS Style Guide, [Outcomes b, c, f],

6.       Critique peer presentations and writing assignments, [Outcomes b, c, d],

7.       Make improvements upon subsequent presentations and writing assignments by recognizing critiques, [Outcomes b, c, d], and

8.       Utilize technology in the preparation and presentation of assignments, [Outcome e].

 


Information about Journal Writing, Article Presentation, and Poster Presentation Assignments

 

Journal Writing Assignment, Chemical Information

 

Write an abstract for the assigned article following the criteria listed below.  The abstract should be typed, double spaced with Times New Roman font size 12.  Bring the abstract to class for peer review.  After the peer review of the abstract, rewrite the abstract using the peer suggestions.  Turn in the rewritten abstract for instructor review.  Using the instructor's feedback, write the final draft of the abstract and turn in the final draft for grading.

 

Abstract Criteria

1.       Problem or purpose stated

2.       Theoretical or experimental plan indicated

3.       Principal findings summarized

4.       Major conclusions pointed out

5.       Concise, self-contained and complete

6.       Typically 1 paragraph between 80-200 words

7.      Proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation

 

Article Presentation Assignment, Chemical Information

 

Goals:  To give you practice at reading and orally presenting chemical literature

 

Assignment: 

1.       Use the article from a journal in the chemistry collection in the WSU library that you chose for the Electronic Library Assignment (Question 5)

 

2.       Prepare a 5-minute Power Point presentation that includes the following:

a.       Statement of the research goals

b.       Background information (may require further literature searching)

c.       Major findings in the article, conclusions, and future research directions

3.       You must also be prepared to answer a minimum of two questions from the audience, one from the instructor and one from the speaker preceding you.  This should take no longer than 5 minutes.

 

4.       Consult the ACS Style Guide Chapter on “Making Effective Oral Presentation” and the journal article by Huddle, P.A. “How to Present a Paper or Poser” Journal of Chemical Education, 2000, 77, 1152-1153.

 

5.       Evaluation will be based on both peer and instructor assessments.


 

Article Presentation Peer and Instructor Assessment, Chemical Information

Note: Expectations are derived from class discussion

 

Name of Presentor:__________________________  Name of Evaluator:____________________________

Circle a number between 1 and 10 (10 being the best) and provide a written explanation of your choice

 

Criterion 1: Presenter’s Attributes

Voice, eye contact, and body language

            Expectations: Clear, loud, fluxuations in tone, words spoken at good pace, pause words avoided (i.e. ah, hmm, like, ok), transitions are smooth from one slide to another.  Plenty of eye contact with audience during talk, avoided reading notes or slides. Relaxed expressions, seemingly interested in topic, gestures not overly distracting, gestures or pointers used to highlight important information.

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10

 

 

 

Criterion 2: Slide Attributes

Writing and Pictures

            Expectations: Clearly seen, eye pleasing, not overcrowded, abbreviations defined, technical jargon defined and limited, graphs/pictures understandable or defined

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10

 

 

 

Criterion 3: Information Presented

Statement of Research Goals and Background

            Expectations: Attention grabbing, clearly stated research goals; background interesting, clear, organized, concise, and thorough for understanding the topic; abbreviations and technical jargon defined.  References provided when necessary (typically at bottom of each necessary slide)

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10

 

 

 

Major Findings, Conclusions, and Future Directions

            Expectations: Information presented in an interesting, clear, organized and concise fashion with appropriate pictures and diagrams.  References provided when necessary.  Concluded with a concise summary of presentation (not overly redundant).

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10

 

 

 

Questions

            Expectations: Reasonable attempts made to answer questions

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10


 

Poster Presentations, Chemical Information

 

General Idea:  Each of you will present a poster based on a paper relevant to a WSU Chemistry Professor's research.  You will present the poster as if it were your research (ie. "we did" or "we saw" in your dialogue).  The posters will be peer and instructor graded during the poster session. 

 

Good Posters: Clearly state the research problem and the conclusion reached; use a minimum of words and panels, a readable font, and clearly labeled graphs and diagrams; and look simple, neat, and pleasing to the eye.  It is highly recommended that you read your book and the hand-outs for further suggestions.

 

Poster Layout:

1) Your poster needs to fill a 4 feet high by 6 feet long space including the title.

2) No abstract is necessary

3) Title Panel (3 lines):

a) Poster title (NOT THE SAME AS THE PAPER)

b) Authors (List your name first and underline it (you are presenting) then list the other paper authors as they appear in the paper.

c) Provide paper reference: (Journal title (italics) year (bold), volume (italics), pages (ie. 457-467).

4) Background and Introduction (1-2 panels)

5) Purpose or statement of problem (1 panel)

6) Experimental or Theoretical Approach; Data and Results; Interpretation (length will vary)

7) Conclusion and "Take-Home Message"

8) References (Use superscript numbers within poster to refer to numbered references. Use format from J.Am.Chem.Soc.).

 

Poster Presentation:  You will be assigned 5 posters to evaluate.

 

Suggestions on how to prepare and give a poster presentation

 

A poster is one of two common methods used at meetings and conferences for communicating the results of recent scientific investigations.  It contains information typical of scientific papers: background, purpose methods, results, interpretation, and conclusions.  Poster differ from slide talks: they rely mainly on nonverbal, visual means of communication; have a fluid, variable audience; and provide unlimited time for a personal interaction.  In terms of information, a poster provides a forum for reporting a contained body of work, a single experiment (or related sets), or something with a straightforward question and clear, clean-cut conclusion.

One of the biggest difficulties people face when putting together a poster presentation is using too much narrative.  A poster conveys meaning to a viewer not only through words, but through data, graphs, charts, tables, colors, structures, and its organization.  Always keep your audience firmly in mind as you prepare your poster presentation.  Think about things that capture your interests and those that would "turn you off" to a subject.  This will assist you in making an excellent poster.

For those of you who will do or are doing research, you will most likely end up presenting your research so here are some hints about preparing for posters.  As you perform your research, keep a folder labeled "POSTER".  In that folder, collect potentially useful graphs, charts, pictures, structures, and other information that can be used to put together a poster.  If you take some time to make things look good before the final few days, the actual poster construction will be a piece of cake.

 

1.       Know what your size limitations are at the beginning. 

 

2.       Make a modular poster.  One design options uses letter sized panels that can be easily arranged and backed on colored posterboard (9.5" 12").  This will easily fit in your briefcase or satchel, occupy reasonable space, and look professional.

 

 

3.       The poster provides detailed information about your work/project, but does not give every single piece of information.  You must judiciously select the parts that tell the viewer a story that makes sense!  Typically, a poster includes the following components:

a.       Title/Author panel or banner

b.       Abstract

c.       Background and Introduction

d.       Purpose or Statement of Problem

e.       Experimental or Theoretical Approach

f.        Data, Results, and Interpretations

g.       Conclusions/Take Home Message

h.       Acknowledgments

i.         References (may be included or separate)

 

4.       Display the poster title in large letters across the top of the poster or in the first panel.  It must be readable from a distance (1 to 1.5 inch letters). Be sure to include your name, collaborators, and the address of the institution in somewhat smaller font underneath the title.

 

5.       Begin organizing your poster around the hypothesis and the data/results; refer back to your research and POSTER folder.  Pick out items that support the conclusions you wish to draw from the work and relay to the viewer.

 

6.       Practice leading a person through your poster.  If it doesn't flow well, consider changing the organization and/or content of your poster.  Poster talks are much less formal than seminars.  Try not to have a set script, instead allow room for conversation with your audience while you are describing your poster.  Be prepared for questions.  Practicing the poster presentation with peers is a good way to get prepared for questions.


 

Peer and Instructor Evaluations for Poster Presentation, Chemical Information

Note: Expectations are derived from class discussion

Poster Presenter Name: ______________________________

 

Please be fair and honest in your assessment.  Under each presentation area is a list of important factors to be considered.  In the comments section, circle all of the prewritten comments that apply.  You may also add additional comments under the grade or on the back.  In the grade section, circle the number that most appropriately reflects the overall quality of that presentation area.  You may circle an individual grade or you may circle two grades indicating somewhere between the two (ie. circling an 5 indicates a solid A grade or circling an 4,5 indicates an A-, B+ grade).

Group Presentation Area

Comments

Presentation Area Grade

Title:

Original (different than the paper)?

Interesting/Attention grabbing?

Format for authors and reference correct?

1) The poster title was very, mostly, somewhat, or not original.

2) The poster title was very, mostly, somewhat, or not very interesting/attention grabbing?

3) The format for the author list and journal reference was absolutely, mostly, somewhat, or not very correct.

5   4   3   2   1

Introduction/Background/Purpose:

Interesting/Attention grabbing?

Goals/purpose stated?

Organized?

Thorough?

Jargon defined?

1) Very good, good, decent, or ok job getting my attention.

2) I definitely, mostly, somewhat, kind of knew the goals/purpose of the poster.

3) The information presented was very, mostly, somewhat, or not very thorough and organized fashion for me to understand the topic.

 

 

 

5   4   3   2   1

Content (experimental approach, data and results, interpretation):

Chemistry clearly explained?

Scientific level appropriate?

Organized?

Smooth flow?

 

   

   

1) The content was presented in a very, mostly, somewhat, or not really creative fashion.

2) All, most, some or little of the chemistry was clearly explained, and at the appropriate level.

3) Information was organized so that I could very, mostly, somewhat, or not very easily follow it.

4) The presenter had a very good, good, decent, or fair energy level and enthusiasm.

6) The presenter had a lot, quite a bit, some, or very little eye contact with the evaluator.

5   4   3   2   1

 

 

 

 

 

5   4   3   2   1

Illustration (Pictures, tables, graphs, ect.):

Creative?

Useful?    

Quantity?

Quality?

Neat?

Organized?

Eye pleasing?

1) Illustrations were very, mostly, somewhat, or not very creative and useful.

2) Addressing the quality of the illustrations:

     They were very, mostly, somewhat, or not very neat.

     They were very, mostly, somewhat or not very organized.

     They were very, mostly, somewhat, or not very eye pleasing.

3) The number of illustrations was very, mostly, somewhat, or not very appropriate

5   4   3   2   1

Conclusion/References:

Summarized information?

References?

 

1) Very good, good, decent, or fair summary of information.

2) References seemed to illustrate a very, mostly, somewhat, or not very thorough background search on the paper.

3) Format of references was absolutely, mostly, somewhat, or not very correct

 

5   4   3   2   1


Chemistry 360 - Chemical Information

Approval/Disapproval Recommendations

 

 

 

Department Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date___________

 

Chairperson Signature________________________________________ Date___________

 

Dean's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved _____* Date___________

 

Dean's Signature________________________________________ Date___________

*In the case of a Dean's recommendation to disapprove a proposal a written rationale for the recommendation to disapprove shall be provided to USS

 

USS Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date___________

 

University Studies Director's Signature________________________________________ Date___________

 

A2C2 Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved______ Date___________

 

A2C2 Chairperson Signature________________________________________ Date___________

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date___________

 

FA President's Signature________________________________________ Date___________

 

Academic VP's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date___________

 

VP's Signature________________________________________ Date___________

 

President's Decision: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date______                         

 

President's Signature________________________________________ Date___________