Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

University Studies Course Approval

 

Department or Program: Chemistry

Course Number: 415

Semester Hours: 2

Frequency of Offering: Once per academic year, ~8 students per section, one section.

Course Title: Physical Chemistry Laboratory II

Catalog Description: Experiments accompanying CHEM 414 (Physical Chemistry II), including experiments dealing with concepts covered in CHEM 412. Meets (two credits toward) University Studies Writing Flag requirement. Laboratory work should be taken concurrently with CHEM 414, but can be taken following successful completion of the course. Utilization of computer hardware/software in data manipulation/analysis and comprehensive composition of lab reports are expected. Prerequisites: ENG 111 and CHEM 413. Offered yearly.

This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2: Yes

This is a new course proposal: No

Proposal Category: Writing Flag

Departmental Contact: Bill Ng, chairperson.

Email Address: cbwng@winona.edu

cbwng@winona.edu

William.Ng@winona.edu

wng@winona.edu

Department Approval and Date:

Dean's Recommendation and Date:

USS Recommendation and Date:

A2C2 Recommendation and Date: __________________________

Faculty Senate Recommendation and Date: __________________________

VPAA Recommendation and Date: __________________________

Dean's Recommendation and Date: __________________________

President's Decision and Date: __________________________

WRITING FLAG COURSE PROPOSAL

Chemistry 415: Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (2 s.h.)

Physical Chemistry deals with the physical principles underlying the properties of chemical substances. The purpose of this junior level chemistry course is to provide students the knowledge and skills needed to understand applications of chemistry concepts to experimental results and the tools needed to apply methods of scientific inquiry (along with chemistry knowledge), resulting in an enhanced understanding of the chemical universe. To that end, students will perform experiments, analyze data, interpret results, and transform these experimental activities into written reports. Upon completion of this course, students will be familiar with the experimental foundations and techniques on which theoretical principles are based. The evaluation of the experimental work will be based primarily on the contents of the laboratory reports written for each experiment. Guidance will be provided on how to prepare laboratory reports in the format of a modern scientific journal. The ACS Style Guide, published by the American Chemical Society, will be used for directions on the organization of a scientific paper, including correct grammar and style, and the accepted formats for citing chemical names, chemical symbols, units, graphs, tables, and references. Each report will be critiqued with relevant comments and discussed individually (between instructor and student) to provide a feedback mechanism so students can improve upon their subsequent reports. Each report will be graded according to specific criteria established in the organizational format of the report. As such, this course will emphasize writing as one of the essential components in academic learning and in the intellectual development of students in Physical Chemistry. Additionally, since this course follows CHEM 413, a greater number of Physical Chemistry principles will be applied to experiments with more sophisticated instrumentation, including higher expectations on data analysis/interpretation, and improved quality on report compositions.

Catalog Description:

Experiments accompanying CHEM 414 (Physical Chemistry II), including experiments dealing with concepts covered in CHEM 412. Meets (two credits toward) University Studies Writing Flag requirement. Laboratory work should be taken concurrently with CHEM 414, but can be taken following successful completion of the course. Utilization of computer hardware/software in data manipulation/analysis and comprehensive composition of lab reports are expected. Prerequisites: ENG 111 and CHEM 413. Offered yearly.

This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields;

Requirements: Students are expected to practice applying the scientific method in the collection of data, to use modern techniques (including computations via mathematical and computer software) in analysis and interpretation of results, and to use proper writing techniques in the composition and completion of several research reports. Each report will be critiqued and evaluated based on specific criteria as established in the organizational format of the report. The reports will follow accepted formats used in scientific journals.

Activities: Students are provided with many opportunities to apply proper writing techniques in relating interpretation of experimental results to chemical principles and theories. The students will discuss the results and interpretations with classmates and will describe the experimental work in a written format consistent with that used in appropriate scientific journals.

b. understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields;

Requirements: Students are expected to produce professional-style scientific reports by following the guidelines of the ACS Style Guide adopted by the American Chemical Society. The reports will parallel the method of scientific reasoning: defining the problem, creating the hypothesis, devising the experiment(s) to test the hypothesis, conducting the experiment, analyzing the data, interpreting the results, and drawing the conclusion.

Activities: Students will follow acceptable scientific writing formats in the composition of several laboratory reports*. The reports will be organized in a format that would parallel the method of scientific reasoning. The general organization of a research report will include: Title/Title Page, Abstract, Introduction, Experimental Details or Theoretical Analysis, Results, Discussion, Conclusion, and References.

*Typically six laboratory reports. Each report (on average) contains ten composition pages, not including graphs, charts, or tables. Additionally, since this course follows CHEM 413, a greater number of Physical Chemistry principles will be applied to experiments with more sophisticated instrumentation, including higher expectations on data analysis/interpretation, and improved quality on report compositions.

c. adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields;

Requirements: Student laboratory reports are expected to follow a format that is consistent with and adopted by the ACS Style Guide, which is the general format required by most chemistry journals.

Activities: Students will be shown examples of ACS Style Guide adopted laboratory reports and chemical journals. They will adapt their writing to be consistent with the general expectations of readers in the chemical field. After each experiment, students will compose a laboratory report and will receive critiques before writing their next reports. Several reports will be required for completion of the course.

d. make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields; and

Requirements: Students are expected to work in pairs to collect several experimental data sets using modern experimental techniques and instruments in Physical Chemistry. Laptops and appropriate software packages will be used to collect data. Resultant data analysis can be incorporated directly into word processors in appropriate formats. Students are also expected to search the literature via library and electronic sources.

Activities: Students work in pairs in data collection. Analysis can be done collaboratively, but laboratory reports must be written individually. Modern instrumentation and appropriate software packages (such as HyperChem for molecular modeling, Mathcad for scientific calculations, Excel for graphical and statistical analysis, LabWorks for on-line data collection and analysis, and Word for report composition) are used to collect data, interpret results, and compose the laboratory report. In addition, students will compare their experimental results to similar studies in the literature, which can be searched via chemistry journals/references in both non-electronic and electronic formats.

e. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

Requirements: Students are required to follow conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation as listed in the ACS Style Guide.

Activities: By composing a laboratory report following each experiment, and by receiving critiques of each report, students will gain a thorough understanding of the format of laboratory reports and the format used in chemical journals.

Submitted with this proposal is a sample CHEM 413 syllabus, which includes the course description, course outcomes, sample laboratory schedule, and evaluation criteria. Also attached is the Format of Laboratory Reports description from the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Manual. In addition, one copy of a sample Student Laboratory Report has been provided for the USP Director.

Sample Syllabus

Winona State University

Chemistry 415 - Spring Semester 20XX

Physical Chemistry Laboratory II - 2 S.H.

Instructor: Dr. C. B. W. Ng (PA-312G, 457-5293)

e-mail: cbwng@winona.edu

Or William.Ng@winona.edu

Web-site: http://course1.winona.edu/wng/

Lab time/schedule: Wednesdays 2:00 - 5:50 pm PA304 / PA 309 / PA 307B

Required Text: Physical Chemistry Laboratory Manual - WSU - Ng

Recommended References: J. S. Dodd (ed.), The ACS Style Guide, 2nd ed., American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. (1997).

J. M. Lannon, Technical Writing, 5th ed., Harper-Collins, New York (1991).

H. Beall and J. Trimbur, A Short Guide to Writing about Chemistry, 2nd ed., Addison Wesley Longman (2001).

R. C. Weast (ed.), CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, CRC Press.

Course Purpose: Physical Chemistry deals with the physical principles underlying the properties of chemical substances. The purpose of this junior level chemistry course is to provide students the knowledge and skills needed to understand applications of chemistry concepts to experimental results and the tools needed to apply methods of scientific inquiry (along with chemistry knowledge), resulting in an enhanced understanding of the chemical universe. To that end, students will perform experiments, analyze data, interpret results, and transform these experimental activities into written reports. Upon completion of this course, students will be familiar with the experimental foundations and techniques on which theoretical principles are based. The evaluation of the experimental work will be based primarily on the contents of the laboratory reports written for each experiment. Guidance will be provided on how to prepare laboratory reports in the format of a modern scientific journal. The ACS Style Guide, published by the American Chemical Society, will be used for directions on the organization of a scientific paper, including correct grammar and style, and the accepted formats for citing chemical names, chemical symbols, units, graphs, tables, and references. Each report will be critiqued with relevant comments and discussed individually (between instructor and student) to provide a feedback mechanism so students can improve upon their subsequent reports. Each report will be graded according to specific criteria established in the organizational format of the report. As such, this course will emphasize writing as one of the essential components in academic learning and in the intellectual development of students in Physical Chemistry. Additionally, since this course follows CHEM 413, a greater number of Physical Chemistry principles will be applied to experiments with more sophisticated instrumentation, including higher expectations on data analysis/interpretation, and improved quality on report compositions.

Course Description: Experiments accompanying CHEM 414 (Physical Chemistry II), including experiments dealing with concepts covered in CHEM 412. Meets (two credits toward) University Studies Writing Flag requirement. Laboratory work should be taken concurrently with CHEM 414, but can be taken following successful completion of the course. Utilization of computer hardware/software in data manipulation/analysis and comprehensive composition of lab reports are expected. Prerequisites: ENG 111 and CHEM 413. Offered yearly.

SAFETY GOGGLES ARE MANDATORY IN THE LABORATORY

Completion of this course will include requirements and learning activities that promote your abilities to achieve the following Outcomes:

a. practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in Physical Chemistry;

b. understand the main features and uses of writing in Physical Chemistry;

c. adapt your writing to the general expectations of readers in Physical Chemistry;

d. make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in Physical Chemistry; and

e. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in Physical Chemistry.

This course will also enhance the laboratory requirement in the Natural Sciences and will additionally provide you the opportunity to improve scientific inquiry through hands-on investigations and to analyze and report the results of those investigations. The completion of this course will satisfy two credits toward the Writing Flag Requirement in the University Studies Program.

Course Details/Requirements/Activities:

In order to do well or pass the course, students are expected to:

1. perform experiments and compose a laboratory report for each experiment, [Outcomes a to e],

2. follow formats of publication style report as recommended by the ACS Style Guide, [Outcomes b, c, e],

3. make improvements upon subsequent reports by recognizing critiques on previous reports, [Outcomes b, c, d, e],

4. utilize modern instrumentation and software packages in the compilation of reports, [Outcome d],

5. collaborate/discuss with students and instructor in data collection/analysis/interpretation, [Outcome c], and

6. review journal publication styles and literature searches, [Outcome b, c, e].

Additionally, since this course follows CHEM 413, a greater number of Physical Chemistry principles will be applied to experiments with more sophisticated instrumentation, including higher expectations on data analysis/interpretation, and improved quality on report compositions.

Students are encouraged to consult with the instructor regarding questions or problems encountered in the writing process. Furthermore, students are encouraged to make use of services provided at the Writing Center.

List of Laboratory Experiments:

 

Expt. #

Description

Page #

 

 

Primary Set

 

 

 

 

Computer Laboratory Session I: Heats of Formation of Conjugated Hydrocarbons

Handout

 

 

Computer Laboratory Session II: The Heat of Formation of Fuels

Handout

4

A Quantum Mechanical Study of Visible Spectra of Conjugated Dyes

41

5

Chemical Kinetics of the Inversion of Sucrose

47

6

Kinetics II: Ascorbic Acid Reduction of Fe(CN)63-

53

7

Liquid-Vapor Equilibrium for a Binary System

59

8

Conductivity and CMC of NaLS

65

 

 

Secondary Set

9

Distribution of a Solute between Immiscible Solvents

71

10

Kinetics of the Base Hydrolysis of Ethyl Acetate - A Conductometric Study

75

11

Solubility and Ionic Strength

79

12

Conductance of Solutions

85

Each report is due two weeks after the completion of each experiment. Due to a limitation of equipment, a rotational schedule will be arranged. The details of experiments are contained in the PChem Lab Manual.

The following table is a typical laboratory schedule for groups of students.

 

 

Chem.415

Labs

Ver-1.0

Rotation of groups of 2 or 3

2

2

2

3

 

 

 

 

(2 S.H.)

 

 

 

 

Spring 2002

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring 02

Week #

Wed

Lab #

Title

Group A

Group B

Group C

Group D

Report Due

Wed

 

 

2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Date

2002

1

Jan. 9

 

 

No Lab

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jan. 9

2

Jan. 16

1

Organization + Review of Lab Report Composition Techniques

All Students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jan. 16

3

Jan. 23

2 [#1]

Formal Computer Lab Session: Heats of Formation

All Students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jan. 23

4

Jan. 30

3

Data Analysis/Computer Lab Session / Report Composition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jan. 30

5

Feb. 6

4 [#2]

Expt.4 / Expt.5 - Rotation

Expt.4

Expt.5

Expt.5

Expt.4

Report #1

Feb. 6

6

Feb. 13

5 [#3]

Expt.4 / Expt.5 - Rotation

Expt.5

Expt.4

Expt.4

Expt.5

 

 

Feb. 13

7

Feb. 20

6

Data analysis / Report Composition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Report #2

Feb. 20

8

Feb. 27

7 [#4]

Expt.6 / Expt.7 / Expt.8 - Rotation

Expt.6

Expt.8

Expt.7

Expt.6

 

 

Feb. 27

9

Mar. 13

8 [#5]

Expt.6 / Expt.7 / Expt.8 - Rotation

Expt.7

Expt.6

Expt.8

Expt.7

Report #3

Mar. 13

10

Mar. 20

9

Data analysis / Report Composition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mar. 20

11

Mar. 27

10 [#6]

Expt.6 / Expt.7 / Expt.8 - Rotation

Expt.8

Expt.7

Expt.6

Expt.8

Report#4

Mar. 27

12

Apr. 3

11

Expt.6 / Expt.7 / Expt.8 - Rotation/Spare

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apr. 3

13

Apr. 10

12

Data analysis / Report composition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Report #5

Apr. 10

14

Apr. 17

13

Data analysis / Report composition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apr. 17

15

Apr. 24

14

Data analysis / Report composition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Report #6

Apr. 24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Total Computer/Organization Weeks

Group A

Group B

Group C

Group D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

Total Data Analysis/Report Composition Weeks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

Total Data Collection Weeks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

Total Lab Weeks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each Report is due 2 or 3 weeks after completion of each Group's Experiment

Total of 6 Reports (One Computer Simulation Report and 5 Experiments)

 

Reports will be graded using a specific criteria table. The following is a sample table.

 

Description

Specifics

Maximum Points

Title Page

Title, Names, Course #, Dates

1

Introduction

Theory, Purpose, Relevance, [Abstract]

4

Expt. Details

Procedure, Theo. Analysis, Set-up

3

Results

Raw Data [ table, graphs, descriptions]

5

Calculations

Sequential, Units, Sig. Figs., Final Results

7

Graphical

Calculated-Plots, Function-fitting, Slope/Intcp

8

Discussion

Relevance to Intro, Applications, Errors, Literature comparisons

6

Conclusion

Final Statement + Ref=s

2

Organization

Page #=s, Headings, Sequential, Readibility

4

Total

40

Late Penality

Negative #

The assessments from the written reports will give your level of achievement relative to Outcomes a to e. The completion of this course will satisfy two credits toward the Writing Flag Requirement in the University Studies Program. Additionally, since this course follows CHEM 413, a greater number of Physical Chemistry principles will be applied to experiments with more sophisticated instrumentation, including higher expectations on data analysis/interpretation, and improved quality on report compositions.

Grading Scale: A ($ 80%) , B (70-79%), C (50-70%), D (45-50%), E (<45%).

Physical Chemistry is a laboratory science that requires active learning. As such, students are required to perform and complete laboratory experiments. These laboratory studies will teach you the various standard techniques used by chemists and most other scientists. This laboratory course is designed to give you practical and hands-on experience of fundamental techniques in Physical Chemistry, application of Physical Chemistry concepts, and enhanced understanding of the scientific method. The laboratory experiments include hands-on activities such as: pre-lab studies/preparations(reviewing and searching of relevant concept/information before doing the actual experiments), learning/practicing/performing experimental techniques, collecting data with modern instrumentation, analyzing results, interpreting/discussing data (relative to models), making conclusions, and complementing these activities with the writing of a laboratory report. The composition of laboratory reports will constitute the assessment toward the grade for this course. The completion of this course will satisfy two credits toward the Writing Flag Requirement in the University Studies Program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional course information can be accessed via the webpage:

http://course1.winona.edu/wng/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Documentation:

1. Format of Laboratory Reports from the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Manual

2. One copy of a sample Student Laboratory Report for the USP Director.

Document #1: Format of Laboratory Reports from the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Manual

Format of Laboratory Reports

 

Guidelines on how to prepare a professional-style laboratory/research report are not routinely available to undergraduate students. For this reason, the following information on report writing with a suggested format is provided to be helpful to undergraduate students.

 

A Useful Text

J. S. Dodd (ed.), The ACS Style Guide, 2nd ed., American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. (1997).

This volume is an invaluable writer's handbook in the field of chemistry. It contains a wealth of data on preparing any type of scientific report and is useful for both students and professional chemists. Every research laboratory should have a copy, and it should be as accessible as the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. It gives pointers on the organization of a scientific paper, correct grammar and style, and accepted formats in citing chemical names, chemical symbols, units, and references. There are useful suggestions on constructing tables, preparing illustrations, using different type faces and type sizes, and giving oral presentations. In addition, there is a brief overview of the chemical literature, the way in which it is organized and how information is disseminated and retrieved. A list of other excellent guides to technical writing is also provided. See also The Basics of Technical Communicating, Cain, B. E.; ACS Professional Reference Book. American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1988.

 

Organization

Most scientific laboratory/research reports, irrespective of the field, parallel the method of scientific reasoning. That is: the problem is defined, a hypothesis is created, experiments are devised to test the hypothesis, experiments are conducted, and conclusions are drawn. This framework is consistent with the following organization of a research report:

Title

Abstract

Introduction

Experimental Details or Theoretical Analysis

Results

Discussion

Conclusion

References

 

Title and Title Page

The title should reflect the content and emphasis of the project described in the report. It should be as short as possible and include essential key words.

The author's name (e.g., Mary B. Chung) should follow the title on a separate line, followed by the author's affiliation (e.g., Department of Chemistry, Central State College, Central, Arkansas, 67123) and possibly the origin of the report (e.g., In partial fulfillment of a Senior Thesis Project under the supervision of Professor Danielle F. Green, June, 1990). For laboratory reports, the partner's name is also included.

All of the above could appear on a single cover page. Acknowledgments and a table of contents can be added as preface pages if desired.

 

Abstract

The abstract should, in the briefest terms possible, describe the topic, the scope, the principal findings, and the conclusions. It should be written last to reflect accurately the content of the report. The length of abstracts vary but seldom exceed 200 words.

The research student should understand that a primary objective of an abstract is to communicate to the reader the essence of the paper. The reader will then be the judge of whether to read the full report or not. The student should also know that if the report were to appear in the primary literature, the abstract would serve as a key source of indexing terms and key words to be used in information retrieval. Author abstracts are often published verbatim in Chemical Abstracts.

 

Introduction

"A good introduction is a clear statement of the problem or project and why you are studying it." (The ACS Style Guide. American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1997.)

The nature of the problem and why it is of interest should be conveyed in the opening paragraphs. This section should describe clearly but briefly the background information on the problem, what has been done before (with proper literature citations), and the objectives of the current project. A clear relationship between the current project and the scope and limitations of earlier work should be made so that the reasons for the project and the approach used will be understood.

 

Experimental Details

This section should describe what was actually done. It is a succinct exposition of the laboratory notebook, describing procedures, techniques, instrumentation, special precautions, and so on. It should be sufficiently detailed that other experienced researchers would be able to repeat the work and obtain comparable results.

In theoretical reports, this section would include sufficient theoretical or mathematical analysis to enable derivations and numerical results to be checked.

If the experimental section is very lengthy and very detailed, as in synthetic work, it can be placed at the end of the report or as an appendix so that it does not interrupt the conceptual flow of the report. Its placement will depend on the nature of the project and the discretion of the writer.

 

Results

In this section, relevant data, observations, and findings are summarized. Tabulation of data, equations, charts, and figures can be used effectively to present results clearly and concisely. For laboratory reports, a sample calculation for each set/sequence of calculations should be included for informational purposes.

 

 

Discussion

The crux of the report is the analysis and interpretation of the results. What do the results mean? How do they relate to the objectives of the project? To what extent have they resolved the problem?

Because the "Results" and "Discussion" sections are interrelated, they can often be combined as one section. Also, error analysis can be incorporated in this section.

 

Conclusions

A separate section outlining the main conclusions of the project is appropriate if conclusions have not already been stated in the "Discussion" section. Directions for future work are also suitably expressed here.

 

Summary

A lengthy report, or one in which the findings are complex, usually benefits from a paragraph summarizing the main features of the report--the objectives, the findings, and the conclusions.

The last paragraph of text in manuscripts prepared for publication is customarily dedicated to acknowledgments. However, there is no rule about this, and research reports or senior theses frequently place acknowledgments following the title page.

 

References

Literature references are collated at the end of the report and are cited in one of the formats described in The ACS Style Guide or standard journals. Do not mix formats. All references should be checked against the original literature.

 

Preparing the Manuscript

The personal computer and word processing have made manuscript preparation and revision a great deal easier than it used to be. Students should have the opportunity to use a word processor, and have access to graphics software that allows numerical data to be graphed, chemical structures to be drawn, and mathematical equations to be represented. These are essential tools of the technical writer. All manuscripts should routinely be checked for spelling (spell-check programs are helpful), and all manuscripts should be carefully proofread before being submitted. For research reports, preliminary drafts should be edited by the faculty advisor before the report is presented in final form.

Approval/Disapproval Recommendations

 

 

Department Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date______

Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

Dean's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved _____* Date______

Dean's Signature_______________________ Date______

*In the case of a Dean's recommendation to disapprove a proposal a written rationale for the recommendation to disapprove shall be provided to USS

USS Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date______

University Studies Director's Signature_______________________ Date______

A2C2 Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved______ Date______

A2C2 Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

Faculty Senate Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date______

FA President's Signature_______________________ Date______

Academic VP's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date______

VP's Signature_______________________ Date______

President's Decision: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date______

President's Signature_______________________ Date______