Approved by Faculty Senate.

University Studies Course Approval

 

Department or Program: Chemistry

Course Number: 436

Semester Hours: 3

Frequency of Offering: Once every other year, ~8 students per section, one section.

 

Course Title: Topics in Environmental Chemistry

Catalog Description: This course covers advanced topics in environmental chemistry. Topics studied will depend upon the interest of the class and may include topics such as acid rain, endocrine disruption, risk assessment, global warming, and bioaccumulation. Meets three credits toward the University Studies Oral/Communication Flag requirement. Prerequisite: Chemistry 320 or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.

This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2: Yes

This is a new course proposal: No

Proposal Category: Oral Flag

Departmental Contact: Jeanne L. Franz

Email Address: jfranz@winona.edu

 

Department Approval and Date: _____________

Dean’s Recommendation and Date: __________________________

USS Recommendation and Date: __________________________

A2C2 Recommendation and Date: __________________________

Faculty Senate Recommendation and Date: __________________________

VPAA Recommendation and Date: __________________________

Dean’s Recommendation and Date: __________________________

President’s Decision and Date: __________________________

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS FLAG COURSE PROPOSAL

Chemistry 436: Topics in Environmental Chemistry (3 s.h.)

 

Effective written and oral communication skills are no less essential to the well-trained scientist than to the humanist. Frequent exercises in writing and speaking are a part of the Chemistry curriculum and are critically evaluated by the chemistry faculty. This course, an advanced topics course in environmental chemistry, is taught in an active, student-centered mode. As in the real world, students are frequently called upon to articulate their ideas in small group and large group discussions in class. In addition, every student will give at least two formal presentations during the course of the semester accounting for greater than 50% of their grade. Ample time will be allotted in class to discussing what makes an effective presentation. This will fit well with the curriculum as risk communication is an essential part of completely understanding and acting upon issues of environmental concern. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to more effectively communicate through both oral and written media. Evaluation of the students’ presentation is based on content, visual aids, style, delivery, and audience involvement. The ACS Style Guide, published by the American Chemical Society, is a valuable resource for directions on the organization of scientific presentations and papers, including correct grammar and style, and the accepted formats for citing chemical names, chemical symbols, units, graphs, tables, and references. Each presentation is critiqued by the professor and other students in the class (anonymously). The results of these critiques are shared with the presenter individually to provide a feedback mechanism for improvement upon subsequent presentations.

 

Catalog Description:

This course covers advanced topics in environmental chemistry. Topics studied will depend upon the interest of the class and may include topics such as acid rain, endocrine disruption, risk assessment, global warming, and bioaccumulation. Meets three credits toward the University Studies Oral/Communication Flag requirement. Prerequisite: Chemistry 320 or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.

 

This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations;

Requirements: Students are expected to give effective oral presentations appropriate to a scientific audience utilizing visual aids. Each formal presentation will be critiqued and evaluated based on specific criteria as established in the syllabus and presentation grading sheet.

Activities: Students are provided with a minimum of two opportunities to present seminars culminating the material learned in the earlier parts of the semester. In addition, numerous opportunities to present results of informal group discussions will be expected.

  1. understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines;
  2. Requirements: Students are expected to give effective oral presentations appropriate to a scientific audience, in this case, their peers and chemistry faculty. At least one student presentation will be geared toward what would be given at a scientific meeting.

    Activities: Students will follow acceptable formats and guidelines for scientific speaking. After each presentation, a question and answer time will be conducted, as is done at most scientific meetings.

    c. adapt their speaking to field-specific audiences;

    Requirements: Students are expected to give effective oral presentations geared toward a wide-variety of groups. It will be emphasized that a most important component of public speaking is to speak to and at the level of the audience.

    Activities: In at least one formal presentation, students will demonstrate effective risk communication techniques. They will gear their presentation to an audience of their choosing, i.e. legislators, environmental groups, parents, farmers, or the general public and will demonstrate the use of important stylistic differences that are essential for effective risk communication.

    d. receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement;

    Requirements: For each presentation, whether practice or formal, students will be critiqued by both the professor and by other students in the class (anonymously). Critiques cover content, visual aids, style, delivery, and audience involvement. The results of these critiques are shared with the presenter individually to provide a feedback mechanism for improvement upon their subsequent presentations.

    Activities: Students will complete and submit critique forms for each presentation attended, both in class and outside of class.

    e. make use of the technologies used for research and speaking in the fields; and

    Requirements: Students are required to use at least one type of visual aid, preferably a computer presentation, such as a PowerPoint presentation. It is stressed, however, that a backup presentation method is often warranted. The written paper assignments will also utilize technology in their production and display. The research necessary to prepare the presentation and papers will often utilize the general internet and specific scientific search databases such as online journals.

    Activities: Students will create presentation-quality visual aids to accompany their oral presentations. A computer-based presentation is required for all of the formal, oral presentations. A comprehensive list of resources used is required to be compiled and distributed to the instructor and classmates

    f. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

    Requirements: Students are required to follow conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation as given in the ACS Style Guide or as common for technical speaking.

    Activities: Proper formatting of references, chemical structures, chemical reactions, etc. will be presented in the oral presentations and the written papers.

    Submitted with this proposal is a sample CHEM 436 syllabus, which includes the course description, course outcomes and a sample grading sheet.

     

    Chemistry 436 Topics in Environmental Chemistry I       3 credits

    Winona State University Spring Semester 2002

    Course Web Page: http://course1.winona.edu/jfranz
    Password for Chemistry 436: environment

    Instructor: Dr. Jeanne Franz Office: Pasteur Hall 312F Phone: (457)-5297 email:jfranz@winona.edu

    Lecture: Switched to:T Th 12:30-1:50 Pasteur 309 

    Office hours: M and W 1-5 and T 2-4, or by appointment *Note I will not be on campus at all on Fridays, I can be reached on this day via my voicemail or email.

    Strongly recommended text:: Modeling the Environment by Andrew Ford Island Press, 1999
    Optional text if you want more information about Stella: Dynamic Modeling of Environmental Systems by Deaton and Winebrake Springer-Verlag, 2000
    References:
    The ACS Style Guide, 2nd ed.; Dodd,J.S., Ed.; American Chemical Society: Washington D.C., 1997. This book will give you guidance on preparing professional presentations and reports including standard citation formats.
    Additional required readings will be available either on the course web site, distributed in class, or available on reserve at the library

    Required materials: Students should have access to a networked computer. Networked copies of Stella computer software have been purchased on your behalf for your use in this class. Computers will be used frequently in class, if you have a laptop, it would be to your advantage to bring it to class on these days.

    General Information: This course will use an active, student centered approach to learning about two topics of importance to environmental scientists and chemists in the modern world, namely risk assessment and global warming. Much of the work in this class will be done in groups.

    Grading:

    In and out of class assignments  

    40%

     

    90% + 2%

    A

    Grades are

    Risk Assessment Project

    30%

     

    80% + 2%

    non-competitive

    Culminating Global Warming 

    30% 

     

    70% + 2%

    C

    and will be

    Activity

     

     

    60% + 2%

    D

    assigned as

       

     

    < 60%

    F

    follows:

    The culminating activity for both the risk assessment and global warming sections of this course will consist of a formal presentation and paper. Criteria for the evaluation of the paper will include both content and more stylistic things like style, delivery, use of visual aids, and audience involvement for the paper and organization, writing ability for the paper.

    Attendance: The nature of this course includes a lot of time for in-class group activities. It is therefore expected that students will come prepared to class everyday. Graded in-class activities cannot be made up except in cases of extreme hardship such as serious illness documented by a physician or death or serious illness in the family.

    Timeliness Policy: Late assignments will have 1% of the value deducted per day including weekends and holidays.  Plan ahead! 

    Oral Presentation will adhere to the following format:

    1. Length of presentation should be approximately 25 (5) minutes (not including questions). Talks shorter than 20 minutes or longer than 30 minutes will adversely affect your presentation grade.

    2. Visual Aids: The use of at least one type of visual aid is required. This may include, but is not limited to, overhead transparencies, slides, computer projection, and demonstrations. The use of computer projections is strongly recommended because it is one of the easiest ways used to make professional presentations. Not using computer generated visual aids will adversely affect your grade. Regardless of the type(s) used, the material displayed should be informative, to the point, and legible.

    3. Grading of presentation: A grading sheet such as the one attached will be completed by the professor. You will also be asked to complete critiques of your colleagues presentations. These critiques will not affect your grade.

    Written papers for culminating activites:

    1. The written papers will be due at the beginning of the period during which the oral presentation is made.

    2. Length: The paper should be 12-15 double-spaced pages in length excluding figures and supplements.

    3. Supplements:

    The following should be attached at the end of your paper in the order given below.

    Endnotes - Denote citations with a superscript in the text and arrange references at the end in the proper format. See ACS Style Guide. You should have at least 15 references.

    Figures, Schemes, Tables, etc. - If not incorporated into the paper text, these should be numbered and titled and limited to one per page.

    4. Grading: Grading will be based on content and adherence to the format above. In addition, writing quality (including grammar, spelling, clarity, and overall organization), quality of the supplements, completeness and correctness will also be graded.

    Additional written assignments will be assigned throughout the semester.

    Chemistry 436: Topics in Environmental Chemistry (3 s.h.)

     

    Effective written and oral communication skills are no less essential to the well-trained scientist than to the humanist. Frequent exercises in writing and speaking are a part of the Chemistry curriculum and are critically evaluated by the chemistry faculty. This course, an advanced topics course in environmental chemistry, is taught in an active, student-centered mode. As in the real world, students are frequently called upon to articulate their ideas in small group and large group discussions in class. In addition, every student will give at least two formal presentations during the course of the semester accounting for greater than 50% of their grade. Ample time will be allotted in class to discussing what makes an effective presentation. This will fit well with the curriculum as risk communication is an essential part of completely understanding and acting upon issues of environmental concern. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to more effectively communicate through both oral and written media. Evaluation of the students’ presentation is based on content, visual aids, style, delivery, and audience involvement. The ACS Style Guide, published by the American Chemical Society, is a valuable resource for directions on the organization of scientific presentations and papers, including correct grammar and style, and the accepted formats for citing chemical names, chemical symbols, units, graphs, tables, and references. Each presentation is critiqued by the professor and other students in the class (anonymously). The results of these critiques are shared with the presenter individually to provide a feedback mechanism for improvement upon subsequent presentations.

     

    Completion of this course will include requirements and learning activities that promote your abilities to achieve the following outcomes:

    a. earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations;

    b. understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines;

  3. adapt their speaking to field-specific audiences;
  4. receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement;
  5. make use of the technologies used for research and speaking in the fields; and
  6. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

The completion of this course will satisfy three credits toward the Oral Communications flag requirement in the University Studies Program.

Course Details/Requirements/Activities:

In order to do well or pass the course, students are expected to:

  1. give effective oral presentations, [Outcomes a to f],
  2. prepare a written paper on the formal presentation topic, [Outcomes e, f],
  3. participate in small group and large group discussions [Outcomes a to d]
  4. follow formats of presentation and publication style as recommended by the ACS Style Guide, [Outcomes b, c, f],
  5. make improvements upon subsequent presentations by recognizing critiques, [Outcomes b, c, d], and
  6. utilize technology in the preparation and presentation of assignments, [Outcome e].

Students are encouraged to consult with the instructor regarding questions encountered during the preparation for the oral seminars or preparation of any of the written assignments including the long papers.

 

 

 

Presentation Evaluation Form

Name: ________________ Title: __________________________________________

Start time: ___________

Circle all that apply End time: _________

Delivery

This section is 15% of your total score

One or more presenters did not speak

Presentation was read

Presenter(s) was/were unfamiliar with content

Presenter used poor grammar/ unprofessional language

Presenter was overly enthusiastic to the point of being distracting

Presenter had familiarity with some parts of presentation

Presenter used little expression/ monotone

Delivery was well paced for audience

Presenter made good eye contact

Presenters were very familiar with content

Presenters used language appropriate for audience

Audio-visual

This section is 15% of your total score

No audio-visual aids were used

Cramped unreadable slides

All black and white slides, even when color was necessary

Audio-visual aids not referred to during presentation

Presenters had an unprofessional appearance

Slides had a poor choice of color, color is distracting

Audio-visual material is distracting (i.e. material blinks even after it is no longer being referred to or music is too loud, etc.)

Small, barely readable text on some/ all slides

Pointer is used in excess/ distracting

Visual aids not used enough

Lots of eye-catching, colorful visual/ audio aids

Visual aids used very effectively to illustrate difficult concepts

Visual aids are easily readable

Appropriate use of audio to illustrate/ enhance presentation (It is possible to have an exemplary presentation without the use of supplementary audio.)

Presenters had a professional appearance

Visual aids only contain relevant information

The audience is or is not (circle one) overwhelmed by visual aids to the point that they are distracted and don’t listen to the speaker.

Content

This section is worth 35% of your total score

The presenters gave a very, mostly, somewhat, or not very clear explanation of their material. (circle one)

All, most, some, none of the content had the depth that you would expect from a 400-level chemistry course (circle one)

All, most, some, none of the presenters seemed to understand the material. (circle one)

How much did you learn from this presentation?

A lot Some Little Nothing

How much of the presentation did you completely understand?

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

 

Audience Involvement This section is worth 15% of your total score

Presenters did not involve audience, they were talking at them rather than to them

No eye contact was made

Presenters were arrogant

Presenters did not ask for questions

Some eye contact was made

Presenters related all some or none of the material to the audiences’ personal experience (circle one)

Presenters asked for questions but answers were unclear or superficial

Presenters got audience involved in presentation

Presentation had an impact on me (circle one)

Strongly agree agree neutral disagree strongly disagree

Presenters welcomed questions, even seemed to be energized by them

Style

This section is worth 10% of your total score

Presentation was canned, no thinking outside of the box was evident

No introduction was given

Presentation was organized

Presentation had an interesting introduction

Presentation was creative, it was clearly evident that the presenters were thinking outside of the box.

Entire presentation was interesting

I stayed with the presentation (circle one)

100 80 60 40 20 0% of the time (i.e. no mind wandering)

Length

This section is worth 10% of your total score

Presentation was shorter than 15 minutes or longer than 35 minutes (not including questions)

The introduction seemed too short or too long (don’t worry about the exact time, just make sure it seems appropriate for given presentation)

The conclusion seemed too short or too long (don’t worry about the exact time, just make sure it seems appropriate for given presentation)

Presentation was 16-21 minutes or 29-34 minutes (not including questions)

Presentation was 22-28 minutes (not including questions)

The length of the introduction was perfect for the material and the audience (Don’t worry about exact time.)

The length of the conclusion was perfect for the material and the audience (Don’t worry about exact time.)

 

 

 

Chemistry 436 - Topics in Environmental Chemistry

Approval/Disapproval Recommendations

 

Department Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date___________

 

Chairperson Signature___________________________________ Date___________

 

Dean's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved _____* Date___________

 

Dean's Signature________________________________________ Date___________

*In the case of a Dean's recommendation to disapprove a proposal a written rationale for the recommendation to disapprove shall be provided to USS

 

USS Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date___________

 

University Studies Director's Signature______________________ Date___________

 

A2C2 Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved______ Date___________

 

A2C2 Chairperson Signature______________________________ Date___________

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date___________

 

FA President's Signature_________________________________ Date___________

 

Academic VP's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date___________

 

VP's Signature________________________________________ Date___________

 

President's Decision: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date______

 

President's Signature____________________________________ Date___________