Approved by Faculty Senate.

University Studies Course Approval Form

  1. Department or Program                                                Communication Studies
  2. Course Number                                                              191
  3. Semester Hours                                                               3
  4. Frequency of Offering                                                  Every Semester (@ 20 sections of 25 students)
  5. Course Title                                                                    Fundamentals of Speech Communication
6. Catalog Description                                                       Students develop interpersonal,  small group and public speaking skills as well as an
                                                                                                 understanding of basic communication principles.      
  7. This is an existing course                                            Yes
      previously approved by A2C2.
  8. This is a new course proposal.                                     No
      (If so, the WSU Curriculum
      Approval From must also be
      be completed as in the process
      prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)
  9. University Studies Requirement this course
      would satisfy                                                   
               Basic Skills, Oral Communication
10. Department Contact Person for  this course          Daniel Lintin - 457-5531   Dlintin@winona.edu
11. General Course Outcomes
        No one can dispute the importance of oral communication in any human interaction, whether it be in an interpersonal, group,
        organizational, or public context. In research done on what employers are looking for in a potential hire, oral communication skills are .
        CmSt 191 prepares students to be competent in these necessary skills. Courses with the "Oral Communication Flag" provide students
        with additional expertise in these areas of oral communication. As such, CmSt 191 is intended as a general introduction to college-level oral
       communication and the Department of Communication Studies encourages all departments and program to build on this preparation.
12. Course Outcomes
        a. deliver a self-prepared speech in a public setting with a reasonable level of competency;
               Students in CmSt 191 are required to present at least two major individually prepared speeches delivered in an
               extemporaneous mode, i.e., from a prepared outline or notes as opposed to from a manuscript, by memory, or in impromptu form. In
               addition, all 191 sections require a major group presentation in which each individual student is responsible for a portion of that  
               presentation. Therefore, students deliver at least three major presentations during the semester. Faculty establish specific criteria
               to be fulfilled for each presentation and students have a chance to practice these criteria in various class activities, thus helping
              student   reach a reasonable level of competency.

        b. demonstrate the basic principles of organizing ideas appropriately for accomplishing informative and persuasive communication
            objectives;

              Every section of CmSt 191 requires at least one informative and one persuasive individual oral presentation.. Students learn
              the proper outlining techniques for oral presentations and employ them in their speeches. Additionally, students work with different
              types of outlines, i.e. topical, spatial,, chronological, problem-solution,  motivated sequence, etc., in order to effectively structure
              their different presentations . Students turn in written outlines which are critiqued for their content and style.

       c. understand and demonstrate the principles of rhetorical sensitivity and effective, audience centered message adaptation, utilizing
           gender-neutral English;
             Students are introduced to the concept of rhetorical sensitivity. People who exhibit this behavior "recognize the unique
              characteristics of their environment and create messages that allow them to be heard by others while retaining their own
              viewpoints."   This concept would include the ability to construct gender-neutral language as well as language that is not offensive
              to specific audience members. Rhetorical sensitivity is assessed through both oral and written assignments.

       d. locate, use, and correctly cite appropriate evidence in supporting their claims;
              Students are expected to use sources in their major presentations.  Students are taught how to locate and evaluate information,
             They are critiqued on the appropriateness and academic rigor of their sources.   Students are encouraged to utilize a variety of
              sources in their presentations, including expert interviews, research surveys, academic journals, suitable media resources, etc.

       e. demonstrate communication behaviors appropriate for effective comprehensive and supportive listening;
             After studying research on listening, students are asked to do various activities and assignments to demonstrate their listening
              competencies.  One such activity could be asking the students to critique the speeches of their peers.

        f.  understand and be able to apply the communication behaviors appropriate for the constructive management of interpersonal and
            intra-group conflict;

             Students study the appropriate behaviors used to manage group conflict and then apply these skills in their task groups.. The
             management of interpersonal conflict is discussed in class and then students complete varying assignments/activities that address
             this issue in their own lives. Students might be asked to role play different conflict situations, both in interpersonal and group
             settings.

        g. understand the skills, roles, and methods of proceeding in task groups in order to achieve high levels of motivation, productivity, and             member satisfaction and to obtain high-quality decisions and/or outputs; and
              While participating in small groups, students have an opportunity to not only learn group concepts but demonstrate their ability
               to apply the appropriate skills for effective group discussion. In becoming acquainted with different group roles, i.e., leader, task,
              process, social, decision-making,, etc,. and models of effective problem solving, students are given the tools to meet the standards of
              this requirement.

        h. understand the components of the communication process and how they enhance and/or hinder the effective exchange of information
             and ideas.

               Different versions of the communication model are considered in the  first chapter of the textbook and is, in effect, discussed
               throughout the semester. Tests, activities, and/or assignments reinforce the understanding of the communication process.

Sample Syllabus
Communication Studies 191
Fall 2001
Fundamentals of Speech Communication

Instructor - Prof. Staff
Office - PAC 2xx, 457-55xx (I have voice mail.)
E-Mail - PStaff@winona.edu
Office Hours - MWF - 10-11, 1-3; Th - 1-2
Text - Julia T. Wood, Communication in Our Lives, 2nd ed. (NY: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 2000).
Course Objectives

              This course serves as an introduction to the field of speech-communication. You will be exposed to the basic theories and hone your
              skills in the areas of interpersonal communication, public speaking, and small group communication.
Late Assignments
             Please make my job easier by turning in every assignment on time. I would advise you to make prior arrangements with me if you know
             you are going to turn in an assignment after the due date. (I reserve the right to take 10% off a day on late assignments.)
Grades and Point Totals
            A - 500-450
            B - 449-400
            C - 399-350
            D - 349-300
            F - 299-0
Assignments and Points
           Test 1 - 100 points
           Test 2 - 100 points
           Group Introductions - 5 points
           Informative Speeches
                  Speech - 60
                  Outline - 25
                  Classmate Critiques - 15
Interpersonal Conflict Analysis - 25
Group Presentation - 40
Persuasive Speeches

                 Speech - 80
                 Outline - 35
                 Classmate Critiques - 15
A student cannot pass this class without completing every assignment.

This is a University Studies Basic Skills Course. It satisfies the Oral Communication Requirement. The outcomes listed for the University Studies Oral Communication Requirement specify that the course provide students the activities and opportunities to:
              a. deliver a self-prepared speech in a public setting with a reasonable level of competency;
              b. demonstrate the basic principles of organizing ideas appropriately for accomplishing informative and persuasive communication
                  objectives;
              c. understand and demonstrate the principles of rhetorical sensitivity and effective, audience centered message adaptation, utilizing
                  gender-neutral English;
              d. locate, use, and correctly cite appropriate evidence in supporting their claims;
              e. demonstrate communication behaviors appropriate for effective comprehensive and supportive listening;
              f. understand and be able to apply the communication behaviors appropriate for the constructive management of interpersonal and
                  Intra-group conflict;
             g. understand the skills, roles, and methods of proceeding in task groups in order to achieve high levels of motivation, productivity, and
                 member satisfaction and to obtain high-quality decisions and/or outputs; and
             h. understand the components of the communication process and how they enhance and/or hinder the effective exchange of
                 information and ideas.


The daily lesson or individual activities/assignments that address specific Oral Communication Requirements are identified in the schedule.

 

Tentative Schedule

Aug. 28 - Intro to Class
Aug. 30 - Chap. 1 - The World of Communication (h)
Sept. 1 - Chap. 2 - Perception and Communication (e)

Sept. 6 - Small Group Concepts/Form Groups
Sept. 8 - Continue

Sept. 11 - Chap. 3 - Communication and Personal Identity
Sept. 13 - Chap. 13 - Planning Public Speaking (e)
Sept. 15 - Group Introductions

Sept. 18 - Chap. 14 - Researching and Developing Support for Public Speeches (d)
Sept. 20 - Chap. 15 - Organizing and Presenting Public Speeches (b)
Sept. 22 - Continue

Sept. 25 - Chap. 5 - The Verbal Dimension of Communication (c, h)
Sept. 27 - Chap. 6 - The Nonverbal Dimension of Communication (h)
Sept. 29 - Continue

Oct. 2 - Chap. 7 - Listening Effectively (e)
Oct. 4 - Continue
Oct. 6 - Test 1 (b, c, h)

Oct. 11 - Informative Speeches (a, b, c, d)
Oct. 13 - Informative Speeches

Oct. 16 - Informative Speeches
Oct. 18 - Informative Speeches
Oct. 20 - Informative Speeches

Oct. 23 - Chap 10 - Foundations of Group and Team Communication (f)
                                 (Classmate Critiques Due) (e)
Oct. 25 - Chap. 11 - Effective Communication in Task Groups (f, g)
Oct. 27 - Continued

Oct. 30 -Persuasive Speaking (b)
Nov. 1 - Chap. 4 - Communication and Cultures (c)
Nov. 3 - Chap. 8 - Foundations of Interpersonal Communication (f)

Nov. 6 - Chap. 9 - Communication in Personal Relationships
Nov. 8 - Continue

Nov. 13 - Group Presentations (b, c, d, f)
Nov. 15 - Group Presentations
Nov. 17 - Group Presentations

Nov. 20 - Persuasive Speaking
                           (Interpersonal Conflict Analysis Due) (f)

Nov. 27 - Persuasive Speeches (a, b, c, d)
Nov. 29 - Persuasive Speeches
Dec. 1 - Persuasive Speeches

Dec. 4 - Persuasive Speeches
Dec. 6 - Persuasive Speeches
Dec. 8 - Persuasive Speeches

Dec. 12 - Test 2 (b, c, f, g, h)
                            (Classmate Critiques Due) (e)