Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

University Studies Course Approval Form

 

1. Department or Program Communication Studies
2. Course Number 280
3. Semester Hours 3
4. Frequency of Offering Yearly - 80 students
5. Course Title Nonverbal Communication
6. Catalog Description Theory and application.
   Emphasis on developmental perspectives of nonverbal communication and the various classes
   of nonverbal messages.
7. This is an existing course Yes previously approved by A2C2.
8. This is a new course proposal. No (If so, the WSU Curriculum Approval From must also be
    be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)
9. University Studies Requirement Humanities
    this course would satisfy
10. Department Contact Person for this course
      Daniel Lintin - 457-5531
      Dlintin@winona.edu
11. General Course Outcomes

Nonverbal Communication is designed to relate the theory of nonverbal
communication with experiential learning. The student is exposed to
nonverbal communication theory through the application of life situations.
The student will be able to identify nonverbal variables and how they affect
intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and organizational
communication.

12. Course Outcomes

A. Identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular
Humanities discipline;

Acts of verbal and nonverbal communication are considered linguistic
units. As such, in Nonverbal Communication the different modes of
nonverbal communication, i.e., environment, proxemics, tactile,
olfaction, physical appearance, etc., are studied to discover the
meaning, individual or shared, that is created. The practice of studying
nonverbal communication can be traced to Greek and Roman
rhetorical scholars who taught speakers to become conversant with
nonverbal communication in order to succeed in their persuasive
attempts.

B. Understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence
perceptions and interpretations; and

It would be difficult to study nonverbal communication without an in
depth study of all three of these variables. For example, the historical
context is examined first through the eyes of the ancients and then
more contemporaneously through the lens of Edward T. Hall’s The
Silent Language
. The fact that nonverbal communication is culturally
derived guides class discussions, tests, and assignments. Finally,
gender differences occur in many , if not all of the modes of nonverbal
communication, for instance, women and men vary in their use of eye
contact, space, touch, etc.

C. Understand the role of critical analysis (e.g., aesthetic, historical, literary,
philosophical, rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expression of
human experience.

As a humanities course, students in nonverbal communication are
engaged in doing aesthetic/rhetorical critiques of the nonverbal
dimension of discourse, In journal assignments, students aesthetically
interpret their classroom, their appearance, and their facial expressions,
as well as rhetorically examine the persuasiveness of the different
modes of nonverbal communication. These assignments enhance the
students critical analysis skills in terms of nonverbal communication.

 

Sample Syllabus
Communication Studies 280

Fall 2000

Nonverbal Communication

Instructor - Prof. Staff
Office - PAC xxx
Office Phone - 457-xxxx
E-Mail - PStaff@winona.edu
Office Hours - MWF - 10-11, 1-3; Th - 1-2

Text - Knapp, Mark L. and Judith Hall. Nonverbal Communication in Human Interaction. Fourth ed.
(Harcourt Brace, 1997).

Attendance and Participation

1. Active participation in class exercises and discussions is required. Lack of attendance will
    affect your participation opportunities. Experiential learning requires your presence.
    Attendance will be taken each period. Be on time. Significantly late is the same as
    being absent. Only legitimate absences are noted. A & P = 25 points

2. You lose two points from your total points for each absence.

3. You are responsible for your absences, including securing handouts and any returned materials.

Examinations

Format for tests and final examination may include: True/False, Multiple Choice, Matching,
Application, Short Answer, and Essay. An extra credit question is available on each test/exam.

1) Test 1 - 100 points

2) Test 2 - 100 points

3) Test 3 - 100 points

4) Test 4 - 100 points

Written Work

1. Journal Entries - 10-20 points per entry

Grading

1. All assignments, including the final grade, will be based on percentages. There will be no
curves. All grade breakdowns will be based on the following:

91-100 - A, 81-90 - B, 71-80 - C, 61-70 - D, 60% - F

2. Miscellaneous work/application WILL BE assigned at any time. Points values will vary and
will be added into the course requirements. You may not ‘make-up’ in-class assignments,
applications, or miscellaneous work.

3. It is not possible to pass this course without completing all major assignments. Major
assignments are defined as worth 15 points or more.

This is a University Studies Arts and Sciences Core Class. It satisfies the Humanities Requirement. The outcomes listed for the University Studies Humanities Requirement specify that the course provide students the activities and opportunities to:

A. Identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular Humanities
discipline;

B. Understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and
interpretations; and

C. Understand the role of critical analysis (e.g., aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical,
rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expression of human experience.

The daily lesson or individual activities/assignments that address specific Humanities Requirements are identified in the schedule.

 

Tentative Schedule

August

T 24 Orientation

R 26 Dyadic Communication and Interaction

T 31 What is Communication? Chap 1-3 (a)

September

R 2 Perspectives of Nonverbal Communication (a, c)

T 7 Application of Nonverbal Communication (b, c)

R 9 Environment Chap 4 (a, b)

JOURNALS DUE (c)

T 14 Environment

R 16 Test 1 (a, b, c)

T 21 Proxemics Chap 5 (a, b)

R 23 Proxemics

T 28 Tactile Communication Chap 8 (a, b)

R 30 Tactile Communication

JOURNAL DUE (c)

October

T 5 Olfaction Chap 6 (a, b)

R 7 Test 2 (a, b, c)

T 12 Physical Appearance Chap 6 (a, b)

R 14 Physical Appearance

T 19 Kinesics Chap 7 (a, b)

R 21 Kinesics

T 26 Facial Expressions Chap 9 (a, b)

R 28 Facial Expressions

November

T 2 Eye Behavior Chap 10 (a, b)

R 4 Test 3 (a, b, c)

T 9 Class Application (c)

R 11 Paralanguage Chap 11 (a, b)

JOURNAL DUE (c)

T 16 Paralanguage

R 18 Chronemics Chap 4 (a, b)

T 23 Class Application (c)

R 25 No Class - Thanksgiving

T 30 Multisignals and Deception Chap 12 (a, b)

December

R 2 Multisignals and Deception

T 7 Class Application (c)

R 9 Future of Nonverbal Communication (a, b, c)

JOURNAL DUE (c)

M 13 Final - 10:30-12:30

Chapters include readings that are due for that class period.

Nonverbal Communication Journal

Journal entries are designed to allow your theoretical knowledge/questions and observational data concerning a specified area of nonverbal communication to be explored in depth. Although specific areas of analysis are outlined per area of study, entries may elaborate on a variety of situational variables. For example, an office or home (environment/olfaction/proxemics/chronemics); a newspaper/magazine/billboard (physical appearance/proxemics/tactile); an interpersonal conflict/communication you were engaged in or observed (kinesics/tactile/proxemics/chronemics): etc.

Journals must be typed, stapled and in a folder. When journals are collected, all previous entries must accompany the new entries. Your analysis is the focus of the course and will be graded as such. Specific examples can only enhance your analysis. Each entry will be worth 10 points unless otherwise noted. Take them seriously. Creativity is never discouraged. Date and concept heading are required.