Approved by Univesity Studies Sub-Committee.  A2C2 action pending.

University Studies Course Approval Form

 

1. Department or Program Communication Studies

2. Course Number 285

3. Semester Hours 3

4. Frequency of Offering Yearly - 70 students

5. Course Title Native American Rhetoric and Culture

6. Catalog Description Examines, in chronological order, American

Indian oratory. Included are speeches by

Indians from first contact with whites to

contemporary rhetoric. The statesmanship

and oratorical ability of these Indian leaders

and the problems they faced from 1750-1910

is emphasized.

7. This is an existing course Yes

previously approved by A2C2.

8. This is a new course proposal. No

(If so, the WSU Curriculum

Approval From must also be

be completed as in the process

prescribed by WSU Regulation

3-4.)

9. University Studies Requirement Unity and Diversity - Multicultural

this course would satisfy Perspectives

10. Department Contact Person for Daniel Lintin - 457-5531

this course Dlintin@winona.edu

11. General Course Outcomes

1. To analyze Native American Rhetoric

2. To begin, or continue, the process of learning about Native American

Cultures

3. To do research on one piece of Native American Rhetoric.

12. Course Outcomes

A. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought,

values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures.

Students learn about the aforementioned knowledge by reading two

novels, various speeches by Native Americans in the 1800s, and then

by listening to student presentations. Among the many Native

American cultures in the United States, there is great diversity in

customs, rituals, values, etc. but in the past few decades, with the birth

of AIM, Native Americans have also discovered some of their

similarities, the elements that unify all Native Americans. Native

American cultures are also contrasted with the white culture, both

historically and contemporaneously. Students demonstrate this

knowledge on tests and in their group presentations.

B. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the

interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences.

The class is constantly interpreting events from both a Native

American and a white perspective. Events like Custer’s Last Stand, or

the Battle of Greasy Grass; the two major events at Wounded Knee; the

Sand Creek Massacre; the Dakota uprising in Minnesota take on

different meanings for Native Americans and whites. As students read

speeches by Native Americans, they learn how Native Americans tried

to defend themselves and their existence on their homeland and the

reactions from the white culture.

C. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the

interactions between individuals and/or groups.

(Only needs to satisfy three of these.)

D. Examine different cultures through their various expressions

Through the class readings and presentations, students look at different

rhetorical acts to see how Native Americans have expressed, and

continue to express, themselves. Novels, speeches, poems, short

stories, children’s stories, the take over of the Bureau of Indian Affairs,

the stand-off at Wounded Knee, and films, are all ways in which

Native Americans have expressed themselves and their culture to

themselves and to people outside of their culture.

E. Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different

culture or cultural group.

(Only needs to satisfy three of these.)

 

 

Communication Studies 285

Native American Rhetoric and Culture

Fall 2000

Instructor - Dan Lintin

Office - PAC 207, 457-5531 (I have voice mail and check it regularly.)

E-Mail - Dlintin@winona.edu

Office Hours -

Texts - May Crow Dog and Richard Erdos, Lakota Woman (NY: Harper Perennial, 1990).

John G. Niehardt, Black Elk Speaks: Being the Life Story of a Holy Man of the Ogalala Sioux

(Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 1990).

W.C. Vanderworth, comp., Indian Oratory: Famous Speeches by Noted Indian Chieftans

(Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1971).

Course Objectives

1. To analyze Native American Rhetoric

2. To begin, or continue, the process of learning about Native American Cultures

3. To do research on one piece of Native American Rhetoric

Participation

Since this is a communication studies course, everyone needs to contribute orally throughout the

semester.

Grades and Points Totals

500-450 - A

449-400 - B

399-350 - C

349-300 - D

299-0 - F

500-300 - P

299-0 - N

Attendance

So much learning takes place during lectures, discussions, and presentations that cannot be made

up by reading and copying someone else’s notes. If you are absent, you are responsible for getting

class notes and class handouts. I will take attendance during every class meeting. If you miss

more than 50% of the class meetings, you cannot earn above a C in this course. Also, I will use

the attendance record to decide if students who are near the borderline of a higher grade should

receive that higher grade.

Class Roll

Every class period I will circulate a Class Roll for you to sign. No one can sign for someone else.

It is your responsibility to make sure that your name is on that Class Roll if you are in class that

day.

Assignments and Points

Test 1 - 110 points

Test 2 - 110 points

Test 3 - 110 points

Test 4 - 110 points

Group Presentation/Bibliography - 60 points

A student cannot pass this class without completing every assignment.

There will be NO extra credit assignments in this course.

 

This is a University Studies Unity and Diversity Class. It satisfies the Multicultural Perspectives Requirement. The outcomes listed for the University Studies Multicultural Perspectives Requirement specify that the course provide students the activities and opportunities to do at least three of the five following requirements:

A. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought,

values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures. **

B. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the

interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences. **

C. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the

interactions between individuals and/or groups.

D. Examine different cultures through their various expressions **

E. Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different

culture or cultural group.

** - These are the requirements that are met with this course.

Requirements A, B, and D are met throughout the reading assignments, group presentations, and tests.

First Four Weeks of the Semester

Black Elk Speaks: Being the Life Story of a Holy Man of the Ogalala Sioux

Second Four Weeks of the Semester

Lakota Woman

Third Four Weeks of the Semester

Speeches from Indian Oratory: Famous Speeches by Noted Indian Chieftans

Fourth Three/Four Weeks of the Semester

Group Presentations on a piece of rhetoric by and/or about Native Americans