Approved by University Studies Sub-Commitee.  A2C2 action pending.

University Studies Course Approval Form

 

1. Department or Program Communication Studies

2. Course Number 286

3. Semester Hours 3

4. Frequency of Offering Yearly - 70 students

5. Course Title African-American Rhetoric and Culture

6. Catalog Description A study of the history of African-American

rhetoric from Negro oratory in the anti-

slavery societies through post-civil war, black

power and contemporary orations.

7. This is an existing course Yes

previously approved by A2C2.

8. This is a new course proposal. No

(If so, the WSU Curriculum

Approval From must also be

be completed as in the process

prescribed by WSU Regulation

3-4.)

9. University Studies Requirement Unity and Diversity, Multicultural

this course would satisfy Perspectives

10. Department Contact Person for Daniel Lintin - 457-5531

this course Dlintin@winona.edu

11. General Course Outcomes

1. to analyze African-American rhetoric and discover themes and strategies

2. to begin, or continue, the process of learning about African-American

culture

3. to begin, or continue, the process of learning about great African-American

rhetors

12. Course Outcomes

A. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought,

values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures.

Through various textual readings in the course, including novels,

speeches, poetry, songs, newspaper accounts, etc., spanning more than

two centuries, students will become acquainted with the different

values and beliefs of African-Americans. These will be

compared/contrasted with those held by different cultures in the

United States, namely white culture. Students will demonstrate their

knowledge in class discussions and in tests.

B. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the

interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences.

Students will be introduced to the concept of polysemy, or “the capacity

of language/discourse to mean in several ways--that is, in the

intentional or unintentional creation of a text that can be, and is, read

differently by members of the two audiences and that can, and will be,

read similarly by members within each of the given audiences.” (Janice

Watson, “In Search of a Hero: An African American Interpretation of

Nelson Mandela’s Address to the United States Congress, Critiques of

Contemporary Rhetoric, ed. Karlyn Kohrs Campbell and Thomas R.

Burkholder, 2nd ed. [Belmont: Wadsworth Pub. Co., 1997] 243.) Soul

on Ice is as an excellent example of an African-American’s

interpretation of American culture which is, in class discussions,

contrasted with white America’s interpretation of that same culture.

Naturally, the students discover that there is no one white

interpretation or one African-American interpretation of American

culture. Factors that influence these differences in interpretation, like

historical background, economic status, gender, etc., are then discussed

in class.

C. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the

interactions between individuals and/or groups.

(Only needs to satisfy three of these.)

D. Examine different cultures through their various expressions

As stated earlier, this course examines African-American culture

through the use of various textual materials, including, but not limited

to, speeches, novels, songs, poetry, autobiographies, newspaper writing,

and film. Also, by examining the rhetorical process of building

arguments within the African-American community, the different

ways African-Americans expressed themselves persuasively are

investigated.

E. Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different

culture or cultural group.

(Only needs to satisfy three of these.)

 

Communication Studies 286

Spring 2001

African-American Rhetoric and Culture

 

Instructor - Dan Lintin

Office - PAC 207, 457-5531 (I have voice mail.)

E-Mail - DLintin@winona.edu

Office Hours - -

Texts - Maria W. Stewart: America’s First Black Woman Political Writer, ed. Marilyn Richardson

(Bloomington: Indiana U Press, 1987).

Crossing the Danger Water: Three Hundred Years of African-American Writing, ed. Deirdre

Mullane (New York: Anchor Books, 1993).

Eldridge Cleaver, Soul on Ice (1968; New York: Dell Publishing, 1999).

Readings on Reserve in Maxwell Library.

Course Objectives

1. to analyze African-American rhetoric and discover themes and strategies

2. to begin, or continue, the process of learning about African-American culture

3. to begin, or continue, the process of learning about great African-American rhetors

Incompletes

Incompletes will only be given in the case of emergencies.

Participation

Since this is a speech/communication course, everyone needs to contribute orally.

Attendance

So much learning takes place during lectures, discussions, and presentations that cannot be made up by reading or copying someone else’s notes. If you are absent, you are responsible for getting class notes and class handouts. If you miss more than 50% of the class meetings, you

cannot earn above a B in this course. Also, I will use the attendance record to decide if students

who are near the borderlines of higher grades should receive those higher grades.

Grades and Point Totals

A - 500-450

B - 449-400

C - 399-350

D - 349-300

F - 299-0

P - 500-300

NC - 299-0

Assignments and Points

4 Tests - 125 points each

This is a University Studies Unity and Diversity Class. It satisfies the Multicultural Perspectives Requirement. The outcomes listed for the University Studies Multicultural Perspectives Requirement specify that the course provide students the activities and opportunities to satisfy three of the five requirements as listed:

A. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought,

values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures.

B. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the

interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences.

C. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the

interactions between individuals and/or groups.

D. Examine different cultures through their various expressions

E. Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different

culture or cultural group.

Requirements A, B, and D are met throughout the reading assignments, class discussions, and tests.

Tentative Schedule

First Four Weeks - Soul On Ice

Next Eight Weeks - Selections from Crossing the Danger Water

Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, Slave Revolts, David Walker, Nat Turner, Frederick

Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, John Brown’s Raid, Henry Highland Garnet,

Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Ida Wells-Barnett, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia

Cooper, Marcus Garvey, Richard Wright, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Jesse Jackson

Last Four Weeks - the rhetoric of Maria W. Stewart, an African-American women who spoke in public

in Boston in the 1830s