Approved by Faculty Senate

To:        A2C2 Course Proposal Subcommittee
From:    Tim Hatfield, Counselor Education
Re:        Requested Rationale for CE 200, Career/Life Decision-Making
              Change from 2 s.h. to 3 s.h.

 Thank you for your careful consideration of my department's request for
University Studies (Contemporary Citizenship category) status for our
existing CE 200 course, for which we also are requesting a change from
2 s.h. to 3 s.h.

 

At your 3/28 meeting, a request was made for a rationale [under 3-4 for
the university's Curriculum Approval Form - II. Course Change]. On
3/28, I did not ask whether or not my 1/12/01 memo [included below in
its entirety] had been available to you. I will use that as the basis
for an expanded rationale, and will include B. Notification and C.
Catalog as well.

 A. Rationale

 The rationale to increase from 2 to 3 s.h. has significant
substantive underpinnings as well as a practical / student equity-based
component. The 3 s.h. course will not be the same course that existed
previously as a 2 s.h. course.

 Course evaluations each term have pointed up the need to significantly
expand several sections of the course, which will not be possible
without moving from 2 to 3 s.h.:

     1.  there is extensive small-group work as well as cooperative/collaborative assignments
          in the course,  and the biggest single need to further improve the quality of the course
          is to devote  ore class time to group-building activities (trust, effective communication,
          leadership, interpersonal style, problem-solving, etc.).

     2. more time for in-class interviews and interaction with WSU faculty, staff, and community
        leaders regarding their career paths. In the past there has been time for 2-3 of these, but
        it would be to the students' advantage to have significantly more exposure to these kinds
        of resource persons and role models.

      3. expanded in-class time for interviewing skill training (both how to be an effective career and
        job information inteviewer and how to be an effective job inteviewee).

     4. expanded in-class time to discuss the creation of effective resumes (print and electronic).

     5. in-class library "lab" time for hands-on learning about www career resources

    6. expanded in-class time to discuss and work on important career societal/contextual issues
         including community involvement and outreach responsibilities for professionals).

 The practical / student equity-based issue we also considered regarding the increase from 2 s.h. to
3 s.h. was cited in the initial 1/12/01 memo to my Dean as well as briefly mentioned in the University
Studies course proposal: Previously it [CE 200] was a 2 s.h. course; this proposal reflects the change
to a 3 s.h. course, in keeping with the 3 s.h. Contemporary Citizenship category for University Studies.
To offer a 2 s.h. course would be tantamount to requiring a student to take more than the requisite 3 s.h.
for this requirement. [I would now add that even if some 1-credit short courses are approved eventually
for the Contemporary Citizenship category, most of the courses coming forward for approval seem to be
3 s.h. courses.]

 B. Notification
       Not Applicable

C. Catalog
      Current 2000-2002 catalog page number for the course description: p. 80    

       Catalog Description:
      200 - Career/Life Decision-Making - 3 S
.H.

This course will provide students an opportunity to explore the skills, processes, and information
necessary to become actively and responsibly involved in their own college program planning as
well as their longer-term career and life planning. Fulfills the University Studies Contemporary
Citizenship requirement. P/NC only.

 

[Copy of initial 1/12/01 memo approved by Den Carol Anderson follows on next page]

 1/12/01

 To:        Carol Anderson

From: Tim Hatfield

 Re: Addendum re CE 200 University Studies Proposal:
        Additional assignments/expectations re increase to 3 s.h.

 The practical rationale for the increase in credits from 2 to 3 s.h. for this course was cited in
the proposal: Previously it was a 2 s.h. course; this proposal reflects the change to a 3 s.h. course,
in keeping with the 3 s.h. Contemporary Citizenship category for University Studies. To offer a
2 s.h. course would be tantamount to requiring a student to take more than the requisite 3 s.h. for
this requirement.

 Substantively, the course requirements have added another book and major integrative writing assignment
[described below]. The additional in-class time will make it possible to devote more time to several
critical issues and processes for which there has not been adequate time in the previous 2 s.h. course -- 1)
directed activities to promote small-group building; 2) additional opportunities to introduce campus
resources and resource persons; 3) interviewing training; 4) resume' (print and electronic); and 5) career
societal/contextual issues (including community involvement and outreach).

 DATE DUE                         ASSIGNMENT

Thursday,                                                    biography / reflection paper (100 points)

 This assignment is to be done individually. Each student is to read the biography of their
choosing (and preferably about a person whose career path is somewhat related to the one
that you might choose to pursue). The cover page should include the following:
Your name; the name of your group; title of the biography  (and the name of the person about
whom it is written, if their name is not in the title); publisher; year published; number of pages;
source [e.g., WSU Library, Web (if so, include Web address), e-book, etc.).
Then,  in 3 to 5 pages (word-processed, double-spaced, Times 12 font, 1 inch margins all around)
of text, discuss the following issues (each to be a separate heading in the paper):

             1. What were the major influences (e.g., people, events) that guided the person in the
              direction that their career path took?

            2. What critical decision points occurred in their life, and how did these impact their career?

            3.   If you could put yourself  in the shoes of the person, and applying what you have
              learned about your own values, knowledge, skills, strengths, and weaknesses, how
              might some of the experiences and decisions in the person's life been different?

           4.   Summarize the major things you have learned about career/life decision-making based
              on your reading about this person's life.

 4/02/01 [resubmitted with 3/28/01 requested change in Catalog Description included]

          3/1/01

To:        University Studies Subcommittee
From: Tim Hatfield, Counselor Education

 Re:         Requested rewrites regarding this previously-submitted (1/10/01)
                 Proposal for approval of CE 200, Career/Life Decision-Making
                 for University Studies, Contemporary Citizenship (3 S.H.)

 I am submitting this revised course approval form, which addresses the clarifications and
additions requested by the University Studies
  Curriculum Subcommittee in February. If
there is any additional information needed, I will be glad to send it forward.

University Studies Course Approval

 Counselor Education Department

CE Course Number:  200

Semester Hours: 3 S.H.

Frequency of Offering: Every semester

Course Title: Career/Life Decision-Making

Catalog Description: 200 - Career/Life Decision-Making -3 S.H.

This course will provide students an opportunity to explore the skills,   processes, and information
necessary to become actively and responsibly involved in their own college program planning as
well as their longer-term career and life planning. Fulfills the University Studies Contemporary
Citizenship requirement. P/NC only.

 

YES, this is an existing course previously approved by A2C2.
   Previously it was a 2 s.h. course; this proposal reflects the change to a 3 s.h. course, in keeping with
   the 3 s.h. Contemporary Citizenship category for University Studies. To offer a 2 s.h. course would
   be tantamount to requiring a student to take more than the requisite 3 s.h. for this requirement].

 NO, this is not a new course proposal.

 University Studies Approval is requested for 3 S.H. in the following category:

Contemporary Citizenship OR  Democratic Institutions (3 S.H.)

 How CE 200 Meets the Requisite Contemporary Citizenship Outcomes

a. use critical thinking to analyze contemporary issues:

        Course assignments are designed to promote increasingly complex student critical thinking, analysis,
        and integrative skills. Application of course concepts both to self and to collaborative group projects is a
        key course construct. For example, the unusual job paper, the group project, and the final paper require
        multiple data sources, collaborative working group discussions to analyze the data, and (for the final paper)
        the integration of conceptual issues with self-knowledge gleaned from the course experience.

  bdemonstrate effective oral and/or written communication of ideas, informed opinions, and/or values:

       Each of the major course assignments requires the effective written communication of ideas, informed
       opinions, and value-based assumptions. Course grading criteria reflect the importance of clear, effective
       writing. Also, career and life planning on a personal level is values-based, necessitating ongoing examination
       of the "fit" of personal values, beliefs, skills, and preferences with the realities of  the workplace and one's
       life in general. Finally, the major emphasis on collaborative group work necessitates intensive oral communication
       among group members before the written assignments are submitted in final form.

 c. find, and use tools of information science related to contemporary issues:

      Several of the assignments for the course require the integration of  multiple types of data, including Web
      sources. In close collaboration with Dr. Sullivan of the WSU Library staff, there is a continuously
      updated web resource page for the course, located at http://www.winona.edu/library/educatio/ce200.htm
    
The primary mode of communication between the instructor and class members is email -- individually, working
     groups, full class. The class is a megasection of up to 180 students, and the expectation at the outset is that all
     students must be email and Web literate.

  d. demonstrate the ability to work effectively independently and/or in collaborative problem-solving
         groups:

         Although students must be productive independently, perhaps the single issue that sets this course apart
         from others is that virtually all course assignments are completed in cooperative learning groups. This
         forces the issue of workplace collegiality in a way that could never be possible in, for example, a one-time
         assignment. Not only the content of assignments is critical, but also the process of working together
         toward completion of course expectations; it is a much more complex --and, I would add, growth-
         promoting -- learning experience than relying only on self.

 e.  identify principles and applications of personal, civic, and/or economic responsibility; understand personal
       responsibility for lifestyle choices:

       The extensive personal data addressed in class about values, beliefs, skills, and preferences is all done in the
       context of personal choices and their impact on self, family, and community. The notion of  "career" is not
       synonymous with "work," as most laypersons think; rather, "career" is the lifelong process of implementing a
       self-concept, with satisfaction to self and benefit to society.

 f.    participate actively (e.g., class discussion, volunteerism, etc.) in issues significant to citizenship in
      contemporary society:

       Daily in-class activities necessitate discussion, reflection on key concepts, and comparisons among
       multiple points of view. As mentioned in "d" above, the critical importance of small group collaboration,
       problem-solving, and implementation is key to the success of all students in the class. Active listening,
       perspective-taking, and consensus-building are taught and reinforced in the course, with  reference to
      their broader societal application. And, as cited in "e" above, the notion of career includes an intentional
      focus on all components of a person's life, including work, family, community humane values, and civic
      responsibility.

 Course Syllabus:

 Career/Life Decision Making

C. E. 200, 3 s.h. credits

[*Meets the University Studies "Contemporary Citizenship" requirement*]

Tim Hatfield

Gildemeister 132

Office Phone: 457-5337

e-mail: thatfield@winona.edu

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES: This course will provide students an opportunity to explore the skills, processes,
and information necessary to become actively and responsibly involved in their own college program planning
as well as their longer-term career and life planning.  All of the Contemporary Citizenship learning outcomes
are met in the course [a. critical thinking; b. oral and written communication; c. use of information science;
d. effective work in collaborative groups; e.personal/civic/economic responsibility and responsibility for lifestyle
choices; f. active learning]. In the course, class members will:

1.  Increase their understanding of the process of career/life planning.
     [Contemporary Citizenship outcomes a, b, c, d, e, f]

2.  Strengthen their self-assessment, decision-making, and collaboration skills.
     [Contemporary Citizenship outcomes a, b, c, d, f]

3.  Explore options within the University's programs.
     [Contemporary Citizenship outcomes a, b, d, e, f]

4.  Become familiar with career planning materials and resources.
     [Contemporary Citizenship outcomes a, c, d, e, f]

5.Develop positive coping skills and strategies to enhance their ongoing college experience.
   [Contemporary Citizenship outcomes a, d, e, f]

TEXTS:

 Michelozzi, Betty N. (2000). Coming alive from nine to five: The career search handbook (6thEd.).
Mountain View, CA: Mayfield.

 Plus one self-selected biography (see assignment criteria below).

NOTE: Please bring the Michelozzi textbook to each class.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

 1.   Attend all class sessions and participate in class activities. Attendance required, since classes depend on
       all students' discussion and active participation in the class group. (150 pts.)

2.   Complete required readings.

3.   Complete all written assignments movie paper (30 pts.)
       unusual job paper (70 pts.)
       biography/reflection paper (100 pts.)
       group project/consultation (150 pts.)
       final project (100 pts.)

4. Complete 2 tests [around Week 4 and Week 11] (2 x 100 pts)

                                      800 total points

 GRADING

All grades in the course are Pass/Fail.

A total of 800 points can be earned in the course, 150 of which are attendance points (5 per class session).
A total of 650 points must be earned for a grade of  Pass.

Prompt feedback from the instructor can be expected for all of your work; rewrites of assignments are permitted.

 General grading criteria: All written assignments are expected to be turned in on time.  For each written
assignment,
        (1) if the assignment criteria are not addressed and/or if the quality of the writing for the assignment is poor,
             no more than 50% of the potential points for the assignment will be earned;

        (2) if the assignment criteria are met and the writing quality is acceptable, from 50% to 90% of the potential
             points for the assignment will be earned; and

        (3) if the assignment criteria are met and the writing quality is very good and the assignment is especially well
             done (e.g., evidence of special creative flair), more than  90% of the potential points for the assignment will
              be earned.

 Group assignments: With the exception of the biography/reflection paper, all major written assignments will be
  completed in your working group . All group members are expected to contribute cooperatively to each assignment,
  all will sign their name on each paper turned in, and each group member will earn the same number of points for the
  assignment, with the following exception. For some assignments, the instructor will have each group complete a group          evaluation form which may result in the addition or subtraction of points for particular group members," based on the
quality of their contribution to the completion of the assignment
".

 Group rules: Each group will be required to decide on a set of rules to guide their work together. The general goal is
to  reach agreement on important issues related to working well together, then write them down so that everyone in the
group has them to refer to. The rules are intended to help prevent problems before they interfere with the work of the
group. One career planning truism is that most people don't lose a job because they don't have the appropriate knowledge
or skills. Rather, they lose a job because they can't get along with their fellow workers. Your group rules will help define a "code of conduct" which is acceptable to all, and also can provide a basis for you to evaluate how well the group is working together.

 Rules can address many different topics, such as attendance at group meetings, how responsibilities/tasks are to be divided
up, expectations about contributing to the work of the group, expected helpful interpersonal behaviors (e.g., listening carefully, criticizing ideas rather than people, etc.). What is most important, however, is that the rules are discussed and agreed upon.
The list can be revised as needed, but a word-processed copy of your first list of group rules (signed by all group members) must be turned in or emailed to the instructor by 9:30 a.m. on the second Tuesday of the course.

 CE 200 WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT DESCRIPTIONS

 General information All written assignments are to be word processed and either

(1)  emailed to the instructor both [paste into the body of the email and attach document] or
(2)  handed in hard copy, double-spaced (Times 12 font), 1 inch margins all around. Any papers
       over one page in length should be stapled together in the upper left-hand corner. Please
       do not package any papers in plastic covers. Your group name and all group members' names
      and signatures (names for emailed papers will have to do) must be on the first page of each
      assignment turned in.

DATE DUE                   ASSIGNMENT
Tuesday,               group rules contract (0 points)
[Contemporary Citizenship outcomes a, b, d, e]
 Group Rules on p. 2 of the syllabus.

 

Thursday,                movie paper (30 points)
[Contemporary Citizenship outcomes b, d, e]

With your group, arrange to see a feature film (in a theater or on video -- your choice). Then number and
list in as specific terms as possible what one of the main characters does in their job.

The idea is to pay close attention to very specific job activities (and the more the better -- bonus
points for lists with more than 25 items)
. For example, if  the character is a police officer, it will
not  be helpful to have a very short list consisting of items like "Does police work," but instead to
specify "makes telephone calls, interrogates witnesses, drives fast, jumps off buildings, etc."

 

DATE DUE                                       ASSIGNMENT

 Tuesday,                             unusual job paper (70 points)
[Contemporary Citizenship outcomes a, b, c, d, e, f]

In your group, you are to go to the library and/or the World Wide Web and identify an unusual job -- and it
must be one requiring a college degree. In the library, the Occupational Outlook Handbook and/or
Dictionary of Occupational Titles are both available in the Reference Department (also, see the index in
your text). Then, as a group, you are to write a 1-2 page word-processed, double-spaced, 12-font paper
describing either

(1) why this is a such a strange-sounding job that no one would want it or
(2) why someone would want to have this unique job. Your paper also must include
       
(1) the official job title,
         (2) its numerical job code in the heading for the paper, and
         (3) at the end of the paper, a list of the sources -- print  or Web -- you used to complete this assignment.

 In addition to the paper itself, each group member individually will complete the following group
assessment questions, worth 10 of the total of 70 points for the assignment.  All of the individual
sheets (make sure you include your name on it) should be stapled together underneath the group paper.

The four questions are:

 1.  What role did you play in the completion of the project? In what ways were you most helpful to the group?
      What do you need to do differently to be most helpful to the group on future projects?

2.  How did the group make decisions about how to go about completing the project?

3.  Given what you have learned from your group experience so far, what kinds of changes in the ways your
      group works together will most help you on your next project?

4.  What specifically needs to happen to make #3 a reality?

 

DATE DUE                                            ASSIGNMENT

 Thursday,                              biography / reflection paper (100 points)
[Contemporary Citizenship outcomes a, b]

 

This assignment is to be done individually.   Each student is to read the biography of their
choosing (and preferably about a person whose career path is somewhat related to the one
that you might choose to pursue). The cover page  should include the following:
Your name; the name of your group; title of the biography (and the name of the person about
whom it is written, if their name is not in the title); publisher; year published; number of pages;
source [e.g., WSU Library, Web (if so, include Web address), e-book, etc.).

Then, in 3 to 5 pages (word-processed, double-spaced, Times 12 font, 1 inch margins all around)
of text, discuss the following issues (each to be a separate heading in the paper):

    1.  What were the major influences (e.g., people, events) that guided the person in the
         direction that their career path took?

    2  What critical decision points occurred in their life, and how did these impact their career?

    3.  If you could put yourself in the shoes of the person, and applying what you have learned about
         your own values, knowledge, skills, strengths, and weaknesses, how might some of the experiences
        and decisions in the person's life been different?

    4. Summarize the major things you have learned about career/life decision-making based on your
        reading about this person's life.

 

DATE DUE                                                  ASSIGNMENT

Thursday,                                          group projects (150 points)
[Contemporary Citizenship outcomes a, b, c, d, e, f]

Your group is to decide on a particular job requiring at least a college education, then create a brief
information portfolio about it based on your library and interviewing research. In no more than 4-6
pages, you are to present a well organized, clearly written report on your findings. Your report will
address the following topics about the job you have selected(and must have separate headings for
each of the 9 sections):

*All papers must include a separate cover page with your group name and the names and signatures
  of group members.

1. Job title and D.O.T. number

2. Educational and training requirements

3. Skills, interests, values, and personality required to be successful in this job (including RIASEC issues -- see
        p. 48 ff. in the text)

4. Job responsibilities, including the most satisfying and the most challenging and/or negative aspects of the work

5. Information about a typical work day

6. Current and projected salary levels

7. Prospects for future employment beyond the year 2000

8. Your group's summary assessment about whether this would be a good job to have, with the main reasons why

9. all reference sources, plus the names and addresses of your interviewees and photocopies of your thank-you note
        to each interviewee

 Much of the background information will be available through reference resources in the WSU Library and the World
Wide Web, but note that outside sources of information must be utilized for this project. Specifically, at least two (2)
interviews must be completed
with persons in the profession. These will be particularly helpful when addressing assignment
#s 2-5.

Persons at WSU, in the Winona community, and from your own family, friends, and resource persons at home may be
included for this portion of your project. In addition, besides the Web and print materials in the reference section of theWSU Library, the Discover career planning computer program at the WSU Counseling Center (Gildemeister 132) and
career films in the Student Support Services resource room (in Howell) may be utilized.

Upon completion of your project, your group will schedule an appointment with the instructor to discuss the project and
the process the group went through to get it done. More information about the scheduling of the appointment will be
presented in class.

DATE DUE                                     ASS IGNMENT

Tuesday,                                         final paper (100 points)
[Contemporary Citizenship outcomes a, b, d, e]

For the final paper, each group will complete a 5 to 8 page,word-processed, double-spaced, 12-font
paper (OR a 10 to 15-minute video involving all group members):

TOPIC: Transport yourself ahead 10 years in time from the date that you will graduate from Winona State (you'll
need to pretend that all of you will graduate in the same year). While you have remained in touch with each other
during the 10 years, you haven't planned an official reunion of your group until now. Although your reunion will
provide you with an opportunity to reminisce about the countless reasons why CE 200 was such an outstanding
course (with the great professor, of course, at the top of the list), you will want to talk mostly about how your lives
and careers have been going.

 

Specifically, from that future perspective, the paper assignment is for your group to write about the most important
aspects of each of your lives and careers during that 10-year period. Your writing should reflect the work that you
have done in this course about your values, skills, interests, goals, and plans. While each group member will have
to decide the specifics to make up and include in the paper, everyone in the group must be certain to address the
following 3 issues in the paper:

                         1. the things you have found the most satisfying about your work and leisure time,

                        2. your most notable achievements during the 10 years, and

                        3. what direction(s) you would like your life to take beyond these 10 years post-WSU.

 Although it cannot be mandated, I also hope that you will do what you can to have some fun with this assignment. 

**Tips on what will make this an exceptionally good paper:

     Besides the general issues addressed in the grading criteria for the course at the beginning of this syllabus, anything  you can do to make this a "unified" paper will get you extra points. Obviously, each group member
will need to write her or his own material for the paper, but what will strengthen your final product is to figure
out what you can do as a group to make the different parts fit together so that what you hand in does NOT look like a bunch of unrelated  papers  just stapled together. For example, some things you could do include

                      1) combining all the different word-processed individual contributions in one document with the same
                         font, margins, etc.;

                      2) writing some kind of introductory section for the paper;

                      3) writing a connecting paragraph in-between each person's sections;

                      4) writing a concluding paragraph for the paper to tie it all together;

                      5) deciding on some creative way to organize the paper to make it distinctively
                          yours; and so on.