Approved by University Studies Sub-Committee. A2C2 action pending.

 

University Studies Course Approval

Department or Program: Education
Course Number: 308
Semester Hours: 3
Frequency of Offering: Every Semester
Course Title: Human Relations and Student Diversity

Catalog Description: A basic course in human relations for education majors. The course takes a laboratory and directed study approach in areas such as communication, group interaction, trust, interpersonal relations and the study of minorities and ethnic groups.

This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2: Yes

This is a new course proposal: No

Department Contact Person: Melanie A. Reap E-mail: mreap@winona.edu

University Studies Approval is requested in: Unity and Diversity – Multicultural Perspectives

Attachment: The attached syllabus and activities outline explain what is typically covered in this course. It also points out in which parts of the course the four selected outcomes for Unity and Diversity - Multicultural Perspectives are addressed.

As required in points 1 and 2 of the approval process, the following address the four selected outcomes listed for Unity and Diversity – Multicultural Perspectives and documents course content and learning activities relevant to those outcomes:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures.

Students will use reports on case studies (for example: parent/teacher conferences, classroom interactions), class presentations (in the areas of cultural, ethnic, or religious groups), reflection on the field trip, and their service learning experience journals to meet this outcome.

2. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences.

Students will meet this outcome through course readings, one-on-one discussions with students of diverse backgrounds (International students at WSU, high school/middle school/elementary school students in St. Paul), and their service learning field experience in culturally/ethnically diverse educational settings. Class lectures and discussion of current issues in culture and schools (ex: celebration of religious holidays) will supplement the students’ field experiences

3. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence interactions between individuals and/or groups.

Students will meet this outcome through in-class lecture/discussion and group reports on case studies on historical and contemporary cultural interactions. For example, a case study might focus on the story of the Hmong in Minnesota – their coming to MN and the problems/prejudices they have encountered since arriving in MN.

4. Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different culture or cultural group.

Students will meet this outcome by interacting with an International student at WSU over the course of the semester and through the service learning field experience in a culturally and ethnically diverse educational setting.

 

Course Syllabus
College of Education
Winona State University

Department: Education Date of Revision: Fall 2000

Course Number: ED 308 Course Title: Human Relations and Student Diversity

Number of Credits: 3 Frequency of Offering: Each semester

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Department of Education Grading: Grade only

Course applies to: All Education Licenses

  1. Course Description

1. Catalog Description

A basic course in human relations for education majors. The course takes a laboratory and directed study approach in areas such as communication, group interaction, trust, interpersonal relations and the study of minorities and ethnic groups.

2. Statement of the major focus and objectives of the course

The course has been designed to provide the student with a human relations mode oriented to future teaching situations. Exercises will enable the student to gain a better grasp of the complexities of the communication process as it occurs in the school setting. Discussion will facilitate feedback from student peers and promote understanding of the group process as it might occur in the classroom. Interpersonal skills activities will expand role flexibility and offer an opportunity to test and practice new behaviors essential to successful teaching. Finally, professional problem solving will introduce the kinds of realistic demands placed on teachers in their professional roles. These components are mixed in balanced proportions to offer an added dimension with which to meet the ever-increasing demand for flexible, dynamic teachers in the public school system. The focus and objectives of this course relate to the knowledge, skills and professionalism of the Effective Educator Program.

The students in ED 308 will:

A. Demonstrate understanding of the importance of human relations skills in
the development of a climate that promotes self-esteem and positive
interpersonal relations by:

1. Developing a set of human relations guidelines and practicing them
throughout the course (professionalism, skills)

2. Understanding and applying the concepts of belonging and "family
connectedness" as crucial to the development of young children through
young adolescents; and

3. Understanding and applying the process and necessity of collaboration
with families and other adults in support of the learning of young children through adolescents (professionalism, skills):

B. Demonstrate understanding of the communication process including
    one-way communication, two-way communication, listening, feedback, and non-verbal communication
    by participation in group activities, practicing communication skills, and identifying roadblocks to
     communication as they occur (skills).

C. Understand the learning challenges faced by ESL students and their
      families as well as strategies for teaching and working with those populations.

D. Demonstrate interaction skills, including professional ethics, trust,
empathy, group roles, leadership styles, and group decision-making
processes by using them in and out of group settings (professionalism,
skills).

E. Demonstrate a global perspective including the sensitivity needed to work
effectively with the various racial and cultural groups that appear in the
classroom:

1. Studying the contributions and lifestyles of the various racial and
cultural groups;

2. Learning to recognize and deal with dehumanizing biases,
discrimination, and prejudices of various racial and cultural groups;

3. Understanding environmental components, which contribute to the
development of positive self-esteem and to positive interpersonal
relations with various racial and cultural groups;

4. Developing respect for human diversity and personal rights (knowledge,
skills);

5. Understand the cultural/historical/governmental perspectives of
Minnesota First Nations (American Indian Tribes)

F. Demonstrate a global perspective including the sensitivity needed to work
effectively with the various exceptional student groups that appear in the
classroom by:

                                  1. Studying the contributions and lifestyles of the various exceptional
                                      student groups;

                                  2. Learning to recognize and deal with dehumanizing biases,
                                      discrimination, and prejudices of various exceptional groups.

                                  3. Understanding environmental components which contribute the
                                      development of positive self-esteem and to positive interpersonal
                                       relations with various exceptional student groups.

3. This course fulfills these requirements for University Studies – Unity and
Diversity – Multicultural Perspectives.

The purpose of the Multicultural Perspectives requirement in University Studies is to develop students’ understanding of diversity (gender, ethnicity, race, etc.) within and between societies. Courses in this area will help students employ a multicultural perspective for examining historical events; contemporary social, economic, and political issues; and artistic, literary, and philosophical expressions.

 

This course promotes students’ abilities to…

A. demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought,
values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures;

B. understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the
interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences;

C. understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interactions
between individuals and/or groups;

D. possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different
culture or cultural group.

 

 

4. Basic instructional plan and teaching methods utilized

This course will use direct instruction, inquiry, reflective research, journals, modeling of instructional strategies (ex: cooperative grouping), simulations, and case studies as methods of instruction. Lessons will include the use of critical thinking and analysis of actual experiences. This course includes structured experiences and unstructured group activities. Some sessions may include visitation and/or observation. Students will also have hands-on experience with various multicultural groups and exceptional students groups on and off campus.

5. Course requirements

The students will have the following learning experiences in ED308:

1. Group activities - case studies

2. Multicultural experiences with international students at WSU

3. Service learning (15 documented hours)

4. Field experience in a culturally and ethnically diverse educational setting (For
example, field trip to the Westside Schools of Excellence, St. Paul)

6. Methods of evaluation

The final grade for this course will be based on the following items:

1. Class participation

2. Journal of multicultural experience and other class experiences

3. Tests and quizzes

4. Completion of service learning project with proper documentation and
reflection paper.

5. Presentation of an independently designed human relations experience that is
written and presented to the class using appropriate educational technology.

7. Textbooks or alternatives

There are no required texts for this course; however, each student is required to research the minority/international group assigned and human behavior topics. In addition, each student must have a notebook for keeping journal notes. Other materials will be from exercises and various forms of media, speakers, and assigned readings.

8. List of references and bibliography

Bigelow, B. (1994). Rethinking our classrooms: Teaching for equity and justice.

Milwaukee, WI: Rethinking Schools.

Bowie, R. & Bond, C. (1994). Influencing future teachers’ attitudes toward Black English: Are we making a difference? Journal of Teacher Education, 45(2), 112-118.

Child, B. J. (1998). Boarding school seasons: American Indian families, 1900-1940. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.

Coatsworth, E. & Coatsworth, D. (1980). The adventures of Nanabush: Ojibway Indian stories. New York, NY: Antheneum

Echevarria, J. & Graves, A. (1998). Sheltered content instruction. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Fashiola, O., Slavin, R., Calderon, M., & Duran, R. (1997). Effective programs for Latino students in elementary and middle schools. Baltimore, MD: Center for Research on the Education of Students Placed At Risk.

Garrison, M. & Bly, M. (1997). Human relations: Productive approaches for the workplace. New York, NY: Allyn and Bacon.

Gollnick, D. & Chinn, P. (1994). Multicultural education in a pluralistic society (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River Falls, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Kessler, R. (2000). The soul of education: Helping students find connection, compassion and character at school. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Lee, E., Menkart, D. & Okazawa-Rey, N. (1998). Beyond heroes and holidays: A practical guide to K-12 anti-racist, multicultural education and staff development. Washington, DC: Network of Educators in the Americas.

McMillan, L. (1997, June 17). Linguists find the debate over " ebonics " uninformed. Education Week, 43, p.A16.

Meyer, M. L. (1994). The White Earth tragedy: Ethnicity and dispossession at a Minnesota Anishinaabe reservation, 1889-1920. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.

Northrup, J. (1997). The Rez Road follies: Canoes, casinos, computers, and birch bark baskets. New York, NY: Kodansha International.

Patton, B. & Griffin, K. (1978). Decision-making group interaction. New York, NY: Harper and Row.

Peshkin, A. (1991). The color of strangers, the color of friends: The play of ethnicity in schools and community. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Spence, G. (1995). How to argue and win every time. New York, NY: St. Martin’s Griffin.

Tannen, D. (1990). You just don’t understand: Women and men in conversation. New York, NY: Ballantine Books.

Vannote, V. (1999). Women of White Earth. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Walton, P., Kuhlman, N., & Cortez, J. (1998, April). Preparing teachers for linguistically and culturally diverse learners: The case for developmental evaluation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego.

Wolfram, W. (1991). Dialects and American English. Upper Saddle River Falls, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

 

308 Activities Outline*

*University Studies outcomes addressed that week are in parentheses.

 

Week 1

Introductory material:

Syllabus

Service learning possibilities

St. Paul trip information

Personal coat of arms activity

Round-robin name game

Assign Color of Strangers, Color of Friends (one chapter/week)

Week 2 (B, C)

The process of communication

Inter vs. intrapersonal communication

Perceived reality

Schema theory

Communication breakdown (telephone game)

Week 3 (B, C)

Verbal vs. non-verbal communication

Drawing activity

Listening – the use of advance organizers

Multiple intelligences (Gardner)

Communicating with each other/parents/children - the roles we play

Week 4 (B, C)

Gender differences in communication – do they exist?

Bias/prejudice (Cosby tape and discussion)

"Bafa, Bafa" activity

 

Week 5

Exam 1

 

Week 6 (A, B, C, D)

"Kiss, shake, bow" activity

Defining diversity

Demographics of Minnesota – historical/current

Who are our students?

Discussion of Color of Strangers, Color of Friends

Initial meeting with International Students [Note: this activity takes place

outside of class]

 

Week 7 (A)

St. Paul trip (first group) [see Humboldt attachment]

Classes in computer lab for Native American web assignment

(see attachment)

 

Week 8 (A)

St. Paul trip (second group)

Classes in computer lab for Native American web assignment

 

Week 9 SPRING BREAK

Week 10 (A, B, C, D)

Cultural differences in communication – case studies

Language and communication:

Slang

ESL

Parent/teacher conference role playing/case study

 

Week 11 (A, B, C, D)

Case studies – culture, ethnicity, gender, different abilities

 

 

Week 12

Exam 2

 

Weeks 13, 14, 15 – Presentations (A)

 

 

EDUC308 – Human Relations and Student Diversity

Discussion Questions

Field Experience trip - Westside Schools of Excellence

 

 

 

SCHOOL CULTURE

Diversity bulletWhat languages do the students speak? bulletWhat kind of slang do the students use? bulletHow do the students express themselves through dress? bulletWhat is the rough minority group break down in your class and school? bulletIs there a dominant social group at your school? Who are they? What evidence did you observe to support your claim? Remember – the dominant group may not necessarily be the largest group in numbers. bulletHow diverse is the faculty?

Cliques/groups bulletWhat cliques or groups are seen in your school? Are they aligned along cultural or racial lines or is there some other criteria for membership? bulletDescribe interactions between groups in a) the classroom and b) the larger school setting. bulletWhat do you observe happening at lunchtime? (This may be more applicable to secondary schools)

 

STUDENT AND TEACHER INTERACTIONS bulletDo you see respectful interactions between teachers and students? Evidence? bulletDo behavior management techniques respect students? Are they demeaning or punitive? What evidence did you observe to support your claim? bulletDuring question/answer times who is called on? Who dominates? What is the wait time like? Is there feedback from the teacher on responses? What kind of feedback? Give concrete descriptions of interactions. bulletDo teachers appear to treat students differently based on race or special needs? bulletWhat are the teacher’s attitudes towards students with different abilities?

 

CLASSROOM/SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT bulletHow is the classroom set up – what is the physical arrangement? bulletDescribe bulletin boards, displays, etc. in the classroom and the school. What do these say to you in terms of the topics we have discussed in Human Relations? bulletDescribe the style(s) of instruction used in your assigned classroom. How do they address students’ self-esteem/self-concept?

 

FOR DR. REAP’S SECTION ONLY:

What similarities/differences do you see between Humboldt/Westside Schools and Riverside H.S. in The Color of Strangers, The Color of Friends?

 

 

 

EDUC 308

Native Americans of Minnesota

Web Assignment

 

For this assignment you will need to identify and summarize 10 web sites pertaining to issues effecting MN-based tribes.

The following sites will provide a jumping off point for your search. You may not include these as part of your ten sites. bulletThe Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe

www.millelacsojibwe.org

bulletMN Indian Affairs Council

www.indians.state.mn.us

bulletPrairie Island Dakota (Sioux) Indian Reservation

www.kstrom.net/maps/mn/prairie.htm

 

Provide a full web address and a concise summary of the information found at that site.

In your summary, consider how you could use that site in a school setting - would it be for teachers or students? In other words, why would we want to visit that site?