Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

 

Course Syllabus

College of Education

Winona State University

 

 

Department: Education Date of Revision: Spring 2002

Course Title: Instructional Planning/Assessment Course Number: 310/311/312

Number of Credits: 3 Frequency of Offering: Semester

Prerequisite(s): MATH 100, ENG 111, CMST 191

Co-requisite(s): EDUC 303/304/305 Grading: Grade only

University Studies: Mathematics/Statistics Flag

Course applies to: Pre-primary, K-12, Secondary Education Licensure

A. Course Description

1. Catalog description

Principles of curriculum formation including writing of objectives, unit planning and daily lesson planning education form the emphasis of this course. Assessment, measurement and evaluation techniques are studied to determine achievement of objectives through teacher-made tests, standardized tests and observation techniques. Statistics of measurement, specialized measurement instruments and test interpretation are also studied. Forty-clock-hours of field experience are required, in addition to the regularly scheduled on-campus class sessions.

2. Statement of the major focus and objectives of the course

This course presents the knowledge base necessary to effectively plan, implement and evaluate curriculum at the appropriate educational level. Students are given the opportunity to develop skills necessary for effective curriculum planning and evaluation by applying this knowledge base to the design of lessons, units and evaluation instruments. The knowledge, skills and professionalism relate to the Effective Educator Program Model.

This course represents a core body of knowledge for the Effective Educator Program. The content is foundational for other education courses, student teaching and assists students in meeting the Minnesota Board of Teaching requirements for the study of curriculum and assessment and how it is related to typical and atypical students.

The following Minnesota Standards for Effective Teaching Practice for Beginning Teachers will be a major focus of the course: Standard 7: Planning Instruction, and Standard 8: Assessment.

 

Students in Education 310/311/312 will:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of curriculum research and theory by applying it to their major area of teaching (skills);

2. Articulate a philosophy of curriculum and instruction (knowledge);

3. Write clear, realistic and usable instructional objectives (skills);

4. Write clear, realistic and usable learner outcomes (skills);

5. Create lesson plans that reflect current goals of education and theories of learning and human development (skills);

6. Apply instructional strategies in lesson/unit planning that address exceptionalities and cultural diversity (skills);

7. Develop a resource unit that incorporates goals for subject matter, teaching

and learning (skills);

8. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of evaluation (knowledge);

9. Construct effective evaluation instruments (skills);

10. Explain aspects of reliability and validity in evaluation approaches (knowledge);

11. Analyze curriculum documents from local and state levels (knowledge);

12. Gain confidence as a classroom teacher (professionalism);

13. Learn to write performance assessments for Minnesota Graduation Standards (skills);

14. Use technology to teach and assess performance on Minnesota Graduation Standards.

 

3. University Studies

This course allows the student to meet the following University Studies Flag requirements in Mathematics/Statistics:

A. Practice the correct application of mathematical or statistical models that are appropriate to their prerequisite knowledge of those areas.

The current emphasis on mandated standardized testing and the media comparison of school test scores underline the need for teachers to have practical experience with the statistics used in educational research and testing. EDUC 310/311/312 provides students with experiences in the calculation of common educational statistics such as measures of Central Tendency (mean, median, mode) and measures of variability (standard deviation, interquartile range, range). The course requires that students learn to interpret standardized test results focusing on the uses and limitations of such tests. Included in the study of standardized tests are grade equivalency, percentile ranking, and norm versus criterion-referenced scores. The course also emphasizes the interpretation of statistics for education and non-education audiences.

B. Make proper use of modern mathematical or statistical methods appropriate to their level of prerequisite knowledge, to include, if statistics is used in a substantive way, the use of a statistical package with graphics capability when appropriate.

Students in EDUC 310/311/312 make use of MicroGrade or other grade book software as well as Excel. Both MicroGrade and Excel are standard statistical packages used by classroom teachers. The course focuses on the application of statistics in classroom assessment and state/national standardized tests.

4. Course outline of the major topics and subtopics

I. Unit One: Introduction

A. Syllabi review (purpose, scope and sequence, competencies/expectancies)

B. Major issues in curriculum and assessment

II. Unit Two: Curriculum Organization and Examination of Materials (Gagne, Tyler, Dewey, Slavin, Johnson and Johnson)

A. Definitions of curriculum

B. Curriculum models presentation and discussion

C. Sources of curriculum

D. School curriculum issues (i.e., tracking, sources of information, multicultural)

E. Current curriculum goals (i.e., critical thinking, cooperative learning, exceptional students)

III. Unit Three: Planning Instruction (Mager, Hunter, Karplus) and Effectively Teaching the Intended Curriculum

A. Writing Instructional Objectives (broad to specific)

B. Writing a Semester (Three-Six Weeks) Curriculum (Unit Plans)

C. Writing Daily Lesson Plans

D. Instructional methods

E. Organizing for instruction

F. Adapting instruction for individual needs (i.e., exceptionalities, at risk, cultural diversity)

G. Teachers planning, instructing, and making decisions

H. Ethical considerations

IV. Unit Four: Foundations

A. Curriculum and assessment foundations (McNeil, Doll, Wiles and Bondi)

V. Unit Five: (Assessment and Evaluation)

A. Educational evaluation (Airasian)

B. Types of evaluation

C. Forms of evaluation

D. Classroom assessment, measurement, and evaluation (Airasian)

E. Review Minnesota Graduation Standards

- Discuss how Minnesota Graduation Standards influence curriculum and assessment

VI. Unit Six: Pupil Progress Reporting (Popham, Airasian) and Interpreting

Standardized Test Results (Airasian)

A. Using computers to organize data (keeping records on the computer)

B. Grading methods

C. Setting up a grade book (keeping records of student progress and

reporting the results)

D. General understanding of normal curve, reliability, validity, norm-referenced, and criterion-referenced

E. General understanding of (central tendency) mean, median, mode, (variability) standard deviation, grade equivalent, percentile rank

F. Politics of assessment

G. Uses and misuses

H. Standardized test interpretation

 

5. Basic instructional plan and teaching methods utilized

A. Lecture/discussion

B. Instructional media

C. Demonstration/role playing

D. Group activities

E. Critiquing peer lesson plans

6. Course requirements

Quality work and class participation are required. Participation in class assumes a balance between active listening and verbal interaction. It is your responsibility to come to class prepared. Prepared means that you have read the material, and you are ready to discuss the application of the readings.

Examinations and several written assignments are scheduled. The assignments include preparing a semester curriculum, daily lesson plans, keeping a grade book, and interpreting standardized test results. All written work must be produced on the computer. Attendance and successful completion of the thirty-clock-hour field experience component is required.

You are expected to exhibit the behavioral standards applied to responsible adults. Attendance is mandatory. If you are sick, you must call before class meets. Absence for any reason is limited.

 

7. Methods of evaluation

There will be a mixture of written assignments, in class quizzes/examinations, written lesson plans, and classroom activities that will be used to evaluate student performance.

Final grade will be based on total points obtained on quizzes/examinations, written assignments, written lesson plans, and classroom activities. Quizzes and examinations are based on course content: readings, lecture, and discussion.

8. Textbook(s) or alternatives

Airasian, P. (2000). Classroom assessment (4th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.

McNeil, J. D. (1996). Curriculum: A comprehensive introduction (5th ed.). New York: Harper Collins Publishers.

Media Resources

Guilbault, D. (Producer), & Paul, G. (Director). (1993). Common miracles in education (film). Oak Forest, IL: MPI Home Video.

Shapiro, A. (Producer), & Flasher, C. (Director). (1989). The Truth About Teachers (film). Santa Monica, CA: Pyramid Film & Video.

9. References and Bibliography

Airasian, P. (2000). Classroom assessment (4th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.

Carey, L. (1994). Measuring and evaluating school learning 1987 (2nd ed.).

Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Dewey, J. (1997). Experience and education. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Doll, R. C. (1995). Curriculum improvement: Decision making and process (9th ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Gagne, R. (1992). Principles of instructional design (4th ed.). Austin, TX: Holt, Rinehart and Winston School Division.

Gronlund, N. (1991). How to write and use instructional objectives (4th ed.). New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Hanna, G. (1993). Better teaching through better measurement. Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.

Hunter, M. (1982). Mastery teaching. El Segundo, CA: TIP Publications.

Jacobs, H.(1989). Interdisciplinary curriculum: Design and implementation. Alexandria,VA: ASCD.

Johnson, D. & Johnson, R. (1994). The new circles of learning: Cooperation in the classroom and school. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Kaplan, R. & Saccuzzo, D. (1993). Psychological testing: Principles, applications, and issues (3rd ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Inc.

Kubiszyn, T. & Borich, G. (1996). Educational testing and measurement: Classroom application and practice (5th ed.). New York, NY: HarperCollins College Publishers.

Lemlech, J. K. (1990). Curriculum and instructional methods for the elementary school (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Linn, R. L. & Gronlund, N. E. (1995). Measurement and assessment in teaching (7th ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Lyman, H. (1997). Test scores and what they mean (6th ed.). Needham Heights, NJ: Allyn and Bacon, Inc.

Mager, R. (1962). Preparing instructional objectives. Belmont, CA: Fearon Publishers.

McDaniel, E. (1994). Understanding educational measurement. Dubuque, IA: Brown & Benchmark.

McNeil, J. D. (1996). Curriculum: A comprehensive introduction (5th ed.). New York: HarperCollins Publishers.

Mehrens, W. & Lehmann, I. (1991). Measurement in education and psychology (4th ed.). Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.

Mitchell, R. & Westerman, J. (1989). Evaluation in the classroom (2nd ed.). Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company.

National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education (1993). Outcome-based standards and portfolio assessment. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company.

Nitko, A. (1996). Educational assessment of students (2nd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Oliva, P. F. (1992). Developing the curriculum (3rd ed.). New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Oosterhof, A. (1994). Classroom applications of educational measurement (2nd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Macmillan Company.

Ornstein, A. C. (1990). Strategies for effective teaching. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers.

Payne, D. (1992). Measuring and evaluating educational outcomes. New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Popham, W. J. (1993). Educational evaluation (3rd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Shepherd, G. D. & Ragan, W. B. (1992). Modern elementary curriculum (7th ed.). Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt Brace College Publishers.

Slavin, R. (1990). Educational psychology: Theory into practice (3rd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Stiggins, R. (1994). Student centered classroom assessment. New York, NY: Macmillan College Publishing Company.

Taba, H. (1962). Curriculum development: Theory and practice. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc.

Thorndike, R. M., Cunningham, G. K., Thorndike, R. L., & Hagen, E. (1991). Measurement and evaluation in psychology and education (5th ed.). New York: Macmillan Publishing Co.

Tyler, R. (1949). Basic principles of curriculum and instruction. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Violato, C., McDougall, D. & Marini, A. (1992). Educational measurement and evaluation. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company.

Walsh, W. (1989). Tests and measurements (4th ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Wiles, J. & Bondi, J. (1998). Curriculum development: A guide to practice (5th ed.). Columbus, OH: Merrill Publishing Company.

Worthen, B. R., Borg, W. R., & White, K. R. (1993). Measurement and evaluation in the schools. White Plains, NY: Longman Publishing Group.

 

10. Alignment of course assignments with University Studies Flag requirements:

Mathematics/Statistics Flag (3hrs)

Assignment

a. Practice the correct application of mathematical or statistical models that are appropriate to their prerequisite knowledge of those areas.

Assignments 5,6,7

b. Make proper use of modern mathematical or statistical methods appropriate to their level of prerequisite knowledge, to include, if statistics is used in a substantive way, the use of a statistical package with graphics capability when appropriate.

 

Assignments 5,6,7