Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

University Studies Course Approval

 

Department of Program: Education

Course Number: 303/304/305

Semester Hours: 4

Frequency of Offering: Every semester

Course Title: Human Development and Learning

Catalog Description:

This course introduces students to the psychological and social dimensions of learning and development and their influence on students’ participation in school. The course focuses on psychological theories of learning and development and the relationship between psychological theory and classroom practice in classrooms.

This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2: Yes

Department contact person: Melanie A. Reap E-mail: mreap@winona.edu

University Studies Approval is requested in: Arts and Science Core - Social Science

Special Note: The attached syllabus is for EDUC 305. The syllabi and course objectives for EDUC 303/304/305 are the same. The division is based on level of specialization – EDUC 303 for elementary education majors, EDUC 304 for middle school and K-12 education majors, and EDUC 305 for secondary education majors. Students at all levels complete a 40-hour field experience and take EDUC 310/311/312 concurrently.

University Studies Social Science objectives:

1. Understand humans as individuals and as parts of larger social systems

Historically, education has viewed the learner as being isolated from the larger social system or as being within the specific culture of the school. These remain valuable theoretical constructs; however, current educational thought emphasizes that although learners are individuals they inseparable from their cultural milieu. They are individuals within a society and we must understand both the individual learner’s differences and the culturally connected learning differences. In ED305, students gain an understanding of this through their field experience and reflective journal entries, and class discussion.

 

2. Understand the historical context of the social sciences

EDCU 305, while providing a basic knowledge of educational psychology, also presents an overview of the foundations of American education. Through readings from pivotal documents in American education and readings about current issues in education, students are exposed to the historical context of American education. Students also gain an understanding of the views society has held about adolescents by viewing movies such as The Blackboard Jungle, Sixteen in Webster Groves, and Stand and Deliver.

 

3. Identify problems and frame research questions relating to humans and their experience

In this course, student teams must complete a 30-minute presentation on a current issue in education. The students must give the historical context of the issue, current ideas on the issue, and recommend a solution to the issue. Ideas for the presentations usually parallel the students’ experiences in their field placement or emerge from their reflection on their own school experiences.

4. Become familiar with the process of theory-building and theoretical frameworks used by the social sciences

This course provides a basic understanding of educational psychology from Behaviorism to Constructivism. More precisely, we look at how these ideas have been incorporated into classroom practice and how society has valued and devalued approaches over time. Students are also led though a process of identifying their own educational philosophy and coming to a synthesis of learning and discipline within a classroom setting.

 

 

5. Understand research methods used in the social sciences

Observational studies, case studies, surveys, and action research form the processes by which students gain an understanding of social science research. The field experience provides a laboratory for students to apply research techniques discussed in the class. Each student is required to complete a research project and present the findings to the class.

6. Describe and detail discipline-specific knowledge and applications

EDUC 303/304/305 is a course geared directly towards future teachers. Therefore, understanding discipline specific knowledge and the application of such knowledge is the raison d’Ítre of the course. Included in this course is the study of motivation, peer influences, societal influences, procedural/conceptual knowledge, and classroom behavior management. Most if this is presented via case studies and some via lecture.

 

7. Understand differences among and commonalities across humans and their experiences as tied to such variables as gender, race, socio-economic status, etc…

This objective is a given in any education course. One cannot study modern American schools and not look at and try to understand how gender, race and SES have an impact on classrooms. In the course, students are reminded of this fact through viewing movies and reading current articles. The content of the movies and articles is reinforced during the field experience. Reflective journal entries force students to confront their prejudices and biases and to develop the skills needed to perceive the impact such factors may be having on a classroom or school.

 

 

 

 

Course Syllabus

College of Education

Winona State University

 

Department: Education Date of Revision: Spring 2000

Course Number: ED 305 Title: Human Development

and Learning

 

Number of Credits: 4 Frequency of Offering: Each Semester

Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in ED 310

Grading: Grade only. As part of the professional education sequence, human development and learning must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. Students who do not meet this minimum requirement will not be permitted to continue through the sequence until the course has been repeated successfully.

Course applies to: Elementary Education: Preprimary majors

A. Course Description

1. Catalog description

This course introduces students to the psychological and social dimensions of learning and development and their influence on students’ participation in school. The course focuses on psychological theories of learning and development and the relationship between psychological theory and classroom practice in early childhood and primary classrooms.

2. Statement of the major focus and objectives of the course


This course represents a core body of knowledge for the Effective Educator Program. The content is foundational for other education courses and student teaching and assists students in meeting the Minnesota Board of Teaching requirements for the study of development and learning and how it related to typical and atypical students. The following Minnesota Standards for Effective Teaching Practice for Beginning Teachers will be a major focus of the course: Standard 2. Student Learning, Standard 3. Diverse Learners, and Standard 5. Learning Environment.

Course Outcomes. The student will:

Knowledge

A. Understand typical developmental progressions and ranges of individual variation within and across developmental domains.

B. Understand differences in how students construct knowledge, acquire skills, and develop habits of mind.

C. Know about areas of exceptionality in learning.

D. Understand the impact of individual experience, talents, prior learning, language, culture, and family and community values on student learning.

E. Understand the impact of life styles, culture and social economic status on learning.

F. Understand human motivation.

G. Understand the principles of effective classroom management and develop a range of strategies to promote positive relationships, cooperation, and a positive, productive learning environment.

H. Understands the role of subject matter in school learning.

I. Understand and identify different approaches to learning and performance (e.g. learning styles, multiple intelligences, and performance modalities).

J. Understand the role of teacher as researcher.

K. Understand the impact of teachers’ beliefs and behaviors on student learning.

Skills

L. Use student thinking, experiences, and strengths as a basis for growth and their errors as an opportunity for learning.

M. Create learning environments which foster self-esteem and positive interpersonal relations among all students.

Professionalism

N. Understand that all children can learn at high levels.

Practice

O. Understands the Minnesota Graduation Standards and their impact on teaching

3. Course outline of major topics and subtopics

I. Overview of Course

A. Minnesota Graduation Standards

B. Professional Dispositions of Effective Educators

C. Teacher as Observer/Researcher

II. Theories of Learning, Development, and Motivation

A. Behaviorism (Pavlov, Skinner, Thorndike)

B. Psycho analytical (Freud, Erikson)

C. Constructivist (Piaget, Vygotsky)

D. Individual

E. Social

F. Cognitive Science (Information Processing)

G. Brain research

    1. Humanistic (Maslow, Rogers)

III. Developmental Domains

A. Biosocial

1. Characteristics of development periods

2. Implications of early, late development

B. Cognitive

1. Characteristics of development periods

2. Implications of early, late development

C. Psychosocial (personal/moral)

1. Characteristics of development periods

2. Implications of early, late development

IV. Individual differences that affect learning

A. Culture

B. Family

C. Gender

D. Ethnicity

E. Intelligence

F. Competing models

G. Biases in assessment of intelligence

H. Multiple intelligences (Gardner)

I. Learning Styles

J. Culture

K. Language

L. Exceptionalities

M. High incidence

N. Low incidence

V. Learning Environments

A. Alignment with Learning Theory

B. Creating Community

C. Classroom management strategies

D. Models of Discipline (Kohn, Glasser, Dreikurs, Gordon)

4. Basic instructional plan and teaching methods utilized

A. Lecture/discussion

B. Instructional media

C. Individual role playing

D. Small group learning activities

E. Field experiences

5. Course requirements

A. Assigned readings

B. Written assignments

C. Participation in cooperative learning activities

D. Presentations

E. Word processing of all written assignments

 

Methods of evaluations will be based on:

A. Papers

B. In and out of class projects

C. Technology projects

 

 

6. Textbooks(s) or alternatives

 

Theories

Meece, J. L. (1997). Child and adolescent development for educators. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Duckworth, E. (1997) Teacher to teacher: Learning from each other. New York: Teachers College Press.

Social dimensions of learning

Kohl, Herbert (1996). I won’t learn from you. New York: the new press.

Rose, mike (1989). Lives on the boundary. New York: penguin.

Rose, mike (1997) Possible lives.

Taylor, denny (1990). Learning denied. Portsmouth, NH: heinemann.

Classroom management/discipline

Kohn, Alfie (1996). Beyond discipline: From compliance to community. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Glasser, William (1986). Choice theory in the classroom. New York: Harper Row.

Dreikurs, R. (1990). The new approach to discipline. New York: Plume.

Gathercoal, F. (1997). Judicious discipline. San Francisco: Caddo Gap Press

Freiberg, H. J. (1999). Beyond behaviorism.

7. References and Bibliography

Ayers, William (1997). To teach. New York: Teachers College Press.

Armstrong, Thomas. (1994). Multiple intelligences in the classroom. Alexandria, N. J.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Banks, J. K. A. (1994). Multiethnic education: Theory and practice. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Brooks, J. G., Books, M. G. (1993). In search of understanding; The case for constructivist classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Bruner, J. (1986). Actual minds, possible worlds. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

Caine, R.N., & Caine, G. (1997), Education on the edge of possibility. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Case, R. (1985). Intellectual development: Birth to adulthood. Orlando, FLA.: Academic Press.

Cleary, Linda M. & Peacock, T. D. (1998). Collected wisdom. Boston: Allyn-Bacon.

Fenstermacher, G. and Soltis, J. (1992). Approaches to teaching. New York: Teacher’s College Press.

Gardner, H. (1993) Multiple intelligences: The theory in practice. New York: Basic Books.

Gardner, H. (1993) The unschooled mind: How children think and how schools should teach. New York: Basic Books.

Gollnick, Donna M. & Chinn, P. C. (1998). Multicultural education in a pluralistic society. New Jersey: Merrill-Prentice Hall.

Goodlad, J. and Keating, P. (eds.) (1990). Access to knowledge. New York: College Entrance Examination Board.

Hamilton, R., & Ghatala, E. (1994). Learning and instruction. New York: McGraw-Hill.

James, W. (1899/1958). Talks to teachers. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

Joyce, B. and Weil, M. (1992) Models of teaching. (4th edition). Englewood Cliff. NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Kauffman, James M., Mostert, M. P., Trent. S. C. & Hallahan, D. P. (1998). Managing classroom behavior: A reflective case-based approach. (second edition). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Kozol, J. (1992) Savage inequalities: Children in america’s schools. New York: Harper Perennial.

Kuhn, D. (ed). (1990). Developmental perspectives on teaching and learning thinking skills. Basel, Switzerland: Karger.

Langer, Ellen J. (1997). The power of mindful learning. Reading, Mass: Addison Wesley.

Lipsky, D. K., & Gartner, A. (1992). Achieving full inclusion: Placing the student at the center of education reform. In W. Stainback & S. Stainback (eds), Controversial issues confronting special education: Divergent perspectives. Needham Heights, Mass.: Allyn & Bacon.

Marzano, R. J. (1992). A different kind of classroom: Teaching with dimensions of learning. Alexandria, N. J.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Miller, P. (1993). Theories of developmental psychology. New York: W. H. Freeman.

Moll, L. (1990). Vygotsky and education: Instructional implications and applications Of sociohistorical psychology. New York: Cambridge Press.

Olson, L. (1996). Achievement gap widening: Study reports. Education Week XVI (14), 1, 31.

Osborne, A. G., & Dimattia, P. (1994). The IDEA’s least restrictive environment mandate: Legal implications, Exceptional Children.. 61, 6-14

Perrone, Vito (1991) A letter To teachers. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Siegler, R. S. (1991). Children’s thinking. (second edition). Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.

Sirontnik, K. A. (1990). Society, schooling, teaching, and preparing to teach. In J. I. Goodlad, et. Al. (eds). The moral dimensions of teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Weinstein, C. S. (1996). Secondary classroom management: Lessons from research and practice. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Weinstein, C. S., & Mignano, A. J. (1997). Elementary classroom management: Lessons from research and practice. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Woolfolk, A. E. (1995). Educational psychology. (Sixth edition). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

8. University Studies objectives

This course meets the following University Studies Social Science objectives:

1. Understand humans as individuals and as parts of larger social systems

Historically, education has viewed the learner as being isolated from the larger social system or as being within the specific culture of the school. These remain valuable theoretical constructs; however, current educational thought emphasizes that although learners are individuals they inseparable from their cultural milieu. They are individuals within a society and we must understand both the individual learner’s differences and the culturally connected learning differences. In ED305, students gain an understanding of this through their field experience and reflective journal entries, and class discussion.

2. Understand the historical context of the social sciences

EDCU 305, while providing a basic knowledge of educational psychology, also presents an overview of the foundations of American education. Through readings from pivotal documents in American education and readings about current issues in education, students are exposed to the historical context of American education. Students also gain an understanding of the views society has held about adolescents by viewing movies such as The Blackboard Jungle, Sixteen in Webster Groves, and Stand and Deliver.

3. Identify problems and frame research questions relating to humans and their experience

In this course, student teams must complete a 30-minute presentation on a current issue in education. The students must give the historical context of the issue, current ideas on the issue, and recommend a solution to the issue. Ideas for the presentations usually parallel the students’ experiences in the field placement or emerge from their reflection on their own school experiences.

4. Become familiar with the process of theory-building and theoretical frameworks usedby the social sciences

This course provides a basic understanding of educational psychology from Behaviorism to Constructivism. More precisely, we look at how these ideas have been incorporated into classroom practice and how society has valued and devalued approaches over time. Students are also led though a process of identifying their own educational philosophy and coming to a synthesis of learning and discipline within a classroom setting.

5. Understand research methods used in the social sciences

Observational studies, case studies, surveys, and action research form the processes by which students gain an understanding of social science research. The field experience provides a laboratory for students to apply research techniques discussed in the class. Each student is required to complete a research project and present the findings to the class.

6. Describe and detail discipline-specific knowledge and applications

EDUC 303/304/305 is a course geared directly towards future teachers. Therefore, understanding discipline specific knowledge and the application of such knowledge is the raison d’Ítre of the course. Included in this course is the study of motivation, peer influences, societal influences, procedural/conceptual knowledge, and classroom behavior management. Most if this is presented via case studies and some via lecture.

7. Understand differences among and commonalities across humans and their experiences as tied to such variables as gender, race, socio-economic status, etc…

This objective is a given in any education course. One cannot study modern American schools and not look at and try to understand how gender, race and SES have an impact on classrooms. In the course, students are reminded of this fact through viewing movies and reading current articles. The content of the movies and articles is reinforced during the field experience. Reflective journal entries force students to confront their prejudices and biases and to develop the skills needed to perceive the impact such factors may be having on a classroom or school.

 

 

Sample semester schedule for EDUC 303/304/305 – Human Development and Learning

SCHEDULE OF TOPICS/EXAMS

 

University Studies objectives are listed in parentheses

(Objectives 1,5,and 7 are also met via your field experience)

WEEK 1 (2,4,7)

Who are our students?

Historical view – reading: Hard Times (excerpt)

WEEKS 2, 3, & 4 (1,4,6)

Constructivism –

Social constructivism/Vygotsky

Cognitive constructivism/Piaget

Information Processing Model

Social Cognitive Approach/observational learning – Bandura

Behaviorism – Skinner

WEEK 5

EXAM 1

WEEK 6 (1,2,4,6)

Social, emotional and moral development:

Bronfenbrenner

Erikson

Kohlberg

Piaget

Historical view – video: The Blackboard Jungle

WEEK 7 (1,2,4,6)

Multiple Intelligences theory – Gardner

Historical view – video: Sixteen in Webster Groves

WEEKS 8, 9, & 10 (1,3,5,6)

Classroom management and behavior control

Case studies

WEEK 11

EXAM 2

WEEK 12 (1,2,4,6)

Societal influences in schools

Video – People Like Us

Reading: - Savage Inequalities (excerpt), Other Peoples Children (excerpt)

WEEK 13

Pulling it together and putting it to use

Video: The First Year

Reading: Educating Esme (excerpt)

WEEK 14

Presentations

WEEK 15

Presentations

Debriefing on field experiences

ALL WORK IS DUE BY THE END OF THIS WEEK.