Approved by Faculty Senate 11/18/02

University Studies Course Approval

 

Department or Program: Education

 

Course Number: 449/549

 

Semester Hours: 3

 

Frequency of Offering: Every semester

 

Course Title: Middle School Philosophy, Organization, and Interdisciplinary Planning

 

Catalog Description: The major focus of this course will be the middle school concept including its philosophy, organization and interdisciplinary team planning. The major objective of this course is to provide future middle school teachers with  a background in the components of the middle school movement and planning appropriate interdisciplinary instruction for middle level learners. This course is designed for secondary education majors, students seeking K-12 licensure, and elementary education majors with a middle school specialization. Thirty-clock-hours of field experience are required in addition to the regularly scheduled on campus class sessions.

 

This is an existing course previoulsy approved by A2C2: Yes

 

Department contact person: Melanie A. Reap   E-mail: mreap@winona.edu

 

University Studies approval is requested in : Writing Flag

 

University Studies Writing Flag Objectives:

            This course allows students to meet the following University Studies Writing Flag requirements:

A. Practice the process and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields.

B. Understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields.

C. Adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields.

E. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

            The Writing Flag requires students to apply the skills learned in their basic skills writing course to the kind of writing they will be do as classroom teachers and action researchers. Students meet these requirements (A,B,C and E) by:

1) Conducting naturalistic observations and writing a description of these observations based on generally accepted guidelines for qualitative research in education (Langenbach, Vaughn & Argaard, 1994; Lincoln & Guba, 1992) and standard style (APA). Audience is intended to be other classroom teachers.

2) Writing an essay describing the influences of race, gender, and socioeconomic status on the development and learning of adolescents. Audience: peers, classroom teachers.

3) Abstracting ten journal articles that describe the characteristics of middle level learners and the purposes of curriculum integration. Audience: peers, classroom teachers.

4) Developing an interdisciplinary teaching unit. This unit will be based on the research conducted in assignments noted above. Audience: the unit will be taught to a middle level group of students; also intended for classroom teachers.

5) Writing their philosophy of learning which will incorporate a reflection of field experiences and theoretical knowledge. Audience: professional education readers such as principals, cooperating teachers, etc.

 

D. Make use of technologies commonly used for research in their fields.

            Students need to familiarize themselves with current research in middle level curriculum, philosophy, and organization. To do this, students must be able to use library retrieval systems and Internet resources. The assignments outlined above require these skills and class time is given for refreshing these skills. More specifically, students will conduct a computer search to identify the major issues in middle level education.

 

 


Course Syllabus

College of Education

Winona State University

 

Department: Education                         Date of Revision:   Spring 2000

 

Course Number:  ED 449/549  Course Title:   Middle School Philosophy, Organization, and Interdisciplinary Planning

 

Number of Credits: 3                                 Frequency of Offering:  Each Semester

 

Prerequisite(s): ED 304 or 305 and 311 or 312                         University Studies: Writing Flag

 

Grading: Grade Only

 

Course applies to: Required for 5 -12, K -12, and K – 6 with Middle School Specialty licensure

 

                              Course Description

 

1.   Catalog Description

 

The major focus of this course will be the middle school concept including its philosophy, organization and interdisciplinary team planning. The major objective of this course is to provide future middle school teachers with  a background in the components of the middle school movement and planning appropriate interdisciplinary instruction for middle level learners. This course is designed for secondary education majors, students seeking K-12 licensure, and elementary education majors with a middle school specialization. Thirty-clock-hours of field experience are required in addition to the regularly scheduled on campus class sessions.

 

2. Statement of the Major Focus and Objectives of the Course

 

This course presents the knowledge base necessary to effectively plan and implement an interdisciplinary curriculum at the middle school level.   Students are given the opportunity to develop skills necessary for effective interdisciplinary planning and teaching by applying this knowledge base to the design of lessons and the delivery of instruction in a field experience.  The knowledge, skills, professionalism, and practice relate to the Effective Educator Program Model.

 

The content of this course is foundational for student teaching at the middle school level and assists students in meeting the Minnesota Board of Teaching requirements for the study of interdisciplinary curriculum and how it is related to typical and atypical students.  The following Minnesota Standards for Effective Teaching Practice for Beginning Teachers will be a major focus of the course: Standard 2:  Learning and Development, Standard 3:  Diverse Learner Needs, Standard 8: Planning Instruction.

 

 

     

Students in Education 449/549 will:

 

1.  Articulate the middle school philosophy and appropriate instructional strategies for middle level learners (knowledge);

2.  Describe the organization and characteristics of effective middle schools (knowledge);

3.  Demonstrate an understanding of young adolescents, their educational, and their developmental needs (knowledge);

4.  Demonstrate an understanding of interdisciplinary planning and apply appropriate instructional strategies for middle level learners (skills);

5.  Apply expertise from major, minor, or area of specialization for development of integrated curriculum plans (skills);

6.  Select and use appropriate instructional strategies to meet the needs of students with exceptionalities and cultural diversity (skills);

7.  Create interdisciplinary lesson plans that reflect current goals of middle level education and theories of learning and young adolescent development (skills);

8.  Develop a teaching unit that incorporates goals for interdisciplinary instruction at the middle school level (skills);

9.  Gain experience and confidence as a classroom teacher in organizing, planning, and teaching classes of middle level students (professionalism);

10. Be prepared for licensure and teaching at the middle school level (professionalism);

11. Work and plan effectively with multi-disciplinary teams (practice);

12.  Present an interdisciplinary lesson to middle level students in field experience (practice).

 

3.  Course Outline of the Major Topics and Subtopics

I.  Unit One: Introduction

            A.  Syllabi review (purpose, scope and sequence, competencies/expectancies)

B.     Major issues in middle level education

II. Unit Two: Middle School Foundations

A.              Middle School purpose, organization, historical development, and philosophical ideas (Queen, Raebeck)                        

C.    Middle School philosophy and interdisciplinary strategies

D.    Organization and characteristics of Middle Schools (Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. Task Force on Education of Young Adolescents)

E.        Young adolescent development (Dacey & Kenny, Santrock, and Stevenson)

III. Unit Three: Planning Instruction, Curriculum Integration, and Interdisciplinary Unit Development (Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. Task Force on Education of Young Adolescents, Lipsitz)

A.  Purposes of Curriculum Integration (Roberts & Kellough)

B.  Curriculum Frameworks (Drake)

C.    Organizational and structural characteristics of middle school curriculum and

instruction

IV. Unit Four: Field-Based Instructional Delivery: Effectively Teaching an Interdisciplinary Unit (Drake, Ellis, Humphreys, & Buggey, Jacobs, Roberts & Kellnough, Post,)

A.  Presenting a research oriented interdisciplinary, thematic unit

B.  Selecting appropriate instructional strategies

C.  License preparation

D.    Presentation of interdisciplinary lessons

 

4.  Basic Instructional Plan and Teaching Methods Utilized

 

Lecture, small and large group discussion, group lesson planning, films and video tapes, student presentation of lesson plans in field experience setting.

 

5.  Course Requirements

 

Quality work and class participation is required.  Participation in class assumes a balance between active listening and verbal interaction.  It is your responsibility to come to class prepared.  Prepared means that you have read the material and you are ready to discuss the application of the readings.

 

Several examinations and written assignments are scheduled.  The assignments include reviewing the literature and writing abstracts on middle level education, planning and teaching an interdisciplinary unit of instruction, and assessing learning.  All written work must be produced on the computer.

 

You are expected to exhibit the behavioral standards applied to responsible adults.  Attendance is mandatory.  If you are sick, you must call before class meets.  Absence for any reason is limited.

 

Methods of Evaluation

 

There will be a mixture of written assignments, in class quizzes/examinations, written lesson plans, and a presentation in the field experience to evaluate student performance.

 

Final grade will be based on total points obtained.  Evaluation will be based on individual performance on projects that apply the knowledge base from the course.

 

Undergraduate/Graduate credit.  During the first week of class, students taking the course for graduate credit will arrange with the instructor to do an extra project, reading, or presentation.

 

6.      Textbook(s) or Alternatives

 

Jacobs, H. H. (Ed.).  (1989). Interdisciplinary curriculum: Design and implementation. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD).

Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. Task Force on Education of Young Adolescents. (1989). Turning points: Preparing American youth for the 21st century (2nd ed.). New York: Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. Task Force on Education of Young Adolescents (Carnegie).

Santrock, J.  (1998).  Adolescence (8th ed).  Boston: McGraw-Hill.

 

Media Resources

(Producer). (1995). Adolescence: Cognitive and moral development. New York: Insight Media.

Haines-Stiles, G., & Montagnon, P. (Co-producers). (1991). Childhood: Among equals.  New York: Ambrose Video Publishing, Inc.

Haines-Stiles, G., & Montagnon, P. (Co-producers). (1991). Childhood: The house of tomorrow.  New York: Ambrose Video Publishing, Inc.

Hanson, C. (Producer). (1995). Adolescence: Social and emotional development. Barrington, IL: Magna Systems.

Linton Productions.  (1993). Integrating the curriculum.  Salt Lake City, UT: Video Journal of Education.

Siverstein, M.(Producer), & Kotre, T.(Director). (1990). Seasons of life: A catalyst for change.  QED Communications, Inc. & the Regents of the University of Michigan.

Stone, D. (Producer).  (1990).  Adolescent development.  New York: Insight Media.

 

 

8.  List of References and the Bibliography

 

Atwell, N.  (1987). In the middle writing, reading and learning with adolescents. Portsmouth,NH: Boynton/Cook Publishers, Inc.

Boccaccini, M. (1988). Middle school a bridge between elementarv and secondarv school (2nd ed.).  Washington, DC: National Education Association.

Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. Task Force on Education of Young Adolescents (Carnegie). (1989). Turing points preparing American youth for the 21st century (2nd ed.). New York: Carnegie.

Dacey, J. & Kenny, M. (1994).  Adolescent development.  Dubuque, IA: Wm. C. Brown Communications, Inc.

Drake, S. M.  (1993lanning integrated curriculum: The call to adventure.  Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Eichhorn, D. (1987) The middle school.  Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association (NMSA).

Elkind, D.  (1984). All grown up and no place to go: Teenagers in crisis.  Reading, MA: Addison Wesley Longman, Inc.

Gall, M.D., Gall, J., Jacobson, D. & Bullock, T. (1990). Tools for Learning. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Hill, J. (1980). Understanding earlv adolescence: A framework. Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute.

Irvin, J. (1997). Reading and the middle school student: Strategies to enhance literacy (2nd ed.).  Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, Inc.

Jacobs, H. H. (Ed.).  (1989). Interdisciplinary curriculum: Design and implementation.     Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Johnson, H. & Markle, G. (1986). What research says to the middle level practitioner. Columbus, OH: NMSA.

Lipsitz, J. (1984). Successful schools for young adolescents. Piscataway Somerset, NJ: Transaction Publishers.

Lounsbury, J. (1978). A Curriculum for the middle school years. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Lounsbury, J. (Ed.)  (1990). Perspectives: Middle school education.  Columbus, OH: NMSA.

Post, T., Ellis, A., Humphreys, A., & Buggey, L. J.  (1997).  Interdisciplinary approaches to curriculum: Themes for teaching. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Queen, J. A.  (1999).  Curriculum practice in the elementary and middle school.  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Raebeck, B. (1990). Transformation of a middle school. Educational Leadership, 47(7),18-21.

Roberts, P. & Kellough, R.  (2000).  A guide for developing interdisciplinary thematic units (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Santrock, J.  (1998).  Adolescence (8th ed).  Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Stevenson, C. (1998).  Teaching ten to fourteen-year-olds (2nd ed.).  Reading, MA: Addison Wesley Longman, Inc.

Wiles, J. & Bondi, J. (1986). Making middle schools work. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Wood, K. E.  (1997).  Interdisciplinary instruction: A practical guide for elementary and middle school teachers. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

 

9. University Studies

            This course allows students to meet the following University Studies Writing Flag requirements:

A. Practice the process and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields.

B. Understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields.

C. Adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields.

E. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

            The Writing Flag requires students to apply the skills learned in their basic skills writing course to the kind of writing they will be do as classroom teachers and action researchers. Students meet these requirements by:

1) Conducting naturalistic observations and writing a description of these observations based on generally accepted guidelines for qualitative research in education (Langenbach, Vaughn & Argaard, 1994; Lincoln & Guba, 1992) and standard style (APA). Audience is intended to be other classroom teachers.

2) Writing an essay describing the influences of race, gender, and socioeconomic status on the development and learning of adolescents. Audience: peers, classroom teachers.

3) Abstracting ten journal articles that describe the characteristics of middle level learners and the purposes of curriculum integration. Audience: peers, classroom teachers.

4) Developing an interdisciplinary teaching unit. This unit will be based on the research conducted in assignments noted above. Audience: the unit will be taught to a middle level group of students; also intended for classroom teachers.

5) Writing their philosophy of learning which will incorporate a reflection of field experiences and theoretical knowledge. Audience: professional education readers such as principals, cooperating teachers, etc.

 

D. Make use of technologies commonly used for research in their fields.

            Students need to familiarize themselves with current research in middle level curriculum, philosophy, and organization. To do this, students must be able to use library retrieval systems and Internet resources. The assignments outlined above require these skills and class time is given for refreshing these skills. More specifically, students will conduct a computer search to identify the major issues in middle level education.

 

 

10. Alignment of University Studies Writing Flag requirements with course assignments:

 

Writing Flag requirements

Assignment*

a. Practice the processes & procedures for creating & completing successful writing in their fields

Assignments 2,3,4,6

b. Understand the main features & uses of writing in their fields

c. Adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields

d. Make use of the technologies commonly used for research in their fields

Assignments 1,2,3,4,6

e. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

Assignments 2,3,4,6

 

*See Assignment Guide for assignment details.

 

 

11.  Assignment Guide

 

Assignment 1:  Middle Level Education (10 pts)

Conduct a computer search to identify the major issues in middle level education.  Abstract ten journal articles on the purpose, organization, historical development or philosophical ideas related to middle school.

 

Assignment 2:  Early Adolescent Development: Group & Individual Observations (20 pts)

Conduct a structured observation of an early adolescent in the school setting for at least two hours in formal and informal interactions with adults and peers.   Write a summary of your observations linking what you observed to what you have read and discussed in class.  Please link your observation to the theories of development and learning presented in the text. 20% of grade.

 

Assignment 3:  Early Adolescent Development: Environmental Influences (20 pts)

Based on your classroom experiences, discuss how culture, home, school, and peer groups influence early adolescent development and learning.  Write a summary of how “life-chances” are influenced by these factors.

 

Assignment 4:  Interdisciplinary Planning (40 pts)

Plan an interdisciplinary teaching unit for presentation to a middle level group of students in a field setting.  This lesson should be based on the research for designing interdisciplinary instructional units.   A completed and detailed lesson plan with appropriate learning activities that address various developmental levels within the classroom is expected for this assignment.

 

Assignment 5:  Instructional Delivery (40 pts)

Presentation of the interdisciplinary unit in a field setting classroom is required.  Accommodation of special needs students will be observed in planning and delivery of instruction.  Your instructor will also observe part of your lesson.

 

Assignment 6:  Philosophy of Teaching in the Middle School Environment (40 pts)

Write your personal philosophy of teaching in the middle school.  

Requirements:

Identify the formal philosophy that best describes your views.  Please draw on your notes and handouts from the presentation on philosophies in Education 311/312 Instructional Planning and Assessment.  Use examples from your field experiences to demonstrate how it would be implemented.

 

Address the following topics:

Curriculum

Instruction

Relationship with students

Classroom management

 

Summarize these views with examples in a 2 to 3 page double spaced paper.