Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

University Studies Course Approval

Department or Program: Engineering

Course Number: ENGR 292

Course Title: Properties of Materials Laboratory

Number of Credits: 2

Catalog Description: (2 S.H.) A lecture-laboratory course. Determination of various mechanical, microscopic and physical properties of metallic and composite materials. Construction of a binary phase diagram. Heat treatment and recrystallization. Corrosion and electrochemical properties of materials. This course is one of four engineering courses that collectively satisfy 6 credits of the writing flag requirement in the University Studies Program.

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2 Yes .

OR

This is a new course proposal No . (If this is a new course proposal, the WSU Curriculum Approval Form must also be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)

Department Contact Person for this course: Maryam Grami

Email: mgrami@winona.edu

The proposed course is designed to satisfy the requirements in (select one area only):

Course Requirements

A. Basic Skills: B. Arts & Sciences Core:

______ 1. College Reading and Writing ______ 1. Humanities

______ 2. Oral Communication ______ 2. Natural Science

______ 3. Mathematics ______ 3. Social Science

______ 4. Physical Development and Wellness ______ 4. Fine & Performing Arts

 

C. Unity and Diversity: D. Flagged Courses:

1. Critical Analysis ___X_ 1. Writing

______ 2. Science and Social Policy ______ 2. Oral

______ 3. a. Global Perspectives ______ 3. a. Mathematics/ Statistics

______ b. Multicultural Perspectives ______ b. Critical Analysis

__ __ 4. a. Contemporary Citizenship

______ b. Democratic Institutions

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING

Course Syllabus

ENGR 292: Properties of Materials Laboratory

 

Spring 2001

Instructor: Dr. Maryam E. Grami

Office: 203G ST`

Tel: (507) 457- 5348

Email: mgrami@winona.edu

Office Hours: Mon. 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Wed. 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m., Fri. 9:00 -12:30 a.m.

 

Teaching Assistant: Bryan Clark

Tutoring Hours: 7 hours/week in Room 213 Stark.

 

Text: MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

BY: William Callister Fifth Edition

 

Course Content:

  1. Formation of Various Crystals Models with Hardballs
  2. (BCC, FCC, HCP and Their Planes) Chapter 3

  3. X-ray Powder Diffraction Method for Chemical Identification Chapter 3

3. Diffusion Chapter 5

4. Tensile Testing Chapter 6

5. Hardness, Microhardness Chapter 6

6. Fracture, Ductile to Brittle Transition of Engineering Materials Chapter 8

7. Fatigue Testing of Metallic Samples Chapter 8

8. Examination of Microstructure of Ferrous Alloys Chapter 9

9. Examination of Microstructure of Non-Ferrous Alloys Chapter 12

 

10. Examination of Microstructure of Polymeric Materials Chapter 16

11. Structure and Properties of Wood Handout

12. Corrosion and Degradation of Metallic Materials Chapter 18

Evaluation:

 

Exam 1 15%

Section 1 Tues. Feb. 27, 2001 Section 2 Mon. Feb. 26, 2001

Final Exam 20%

Last week of the semester

Laboratory Reports 55%

Laboratory Performance 5%

Portfolio* 5%

* Portfolio: include:

Class notes, Lab reports, Exam, Class handouts

References:

1. James F. Shackelford, Introduction to Materials Science for Engineers, 4th ed., Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 1996.

2. William F. Smith, Principles of Materials Science and Engineering, 3rd ed, Mc Graw Hill, New York, 1996.

Note 1: If a student did not attend a laboratory session he/she will be penalized for 50% of that lab report grade.

Note 2: You are required to wear Safety Glasses in the laboratory all the times. If a student failed to wear Safety Glasses he/she will be dismissed for the day and will receive failing grade for that lab.

(Local address for Safety Glasses: Tristate Airgas, 301 E 3rd St. Winona, 454-8445)

Objectives:

This course provides the opportunity to acquire an in-depth knowledge of materials property. It introduces the relationships between the chemical, mechanical and structural nature of the materials as well as their thermal history. Students will also examine the microstructure of some major engineering materials and relate them to their chemical composition. An integral objective of this course is to learn writing laboratory reports and improving the technical writing and literature search skills of students.

This course is the first laboratory course in the field of materials science and engineering. It enables student to understand how and why materials properties are related to their thermal or mechanical history and their atomic arrangement.

This course is designed to Satisfy the requirements in Writing Flag.

 

Contribution of Course to Writing Flag Requirements:

Topic

Outcome

Course 1/4. Properties of Materials Lab

Creating & completing successful writing

Understand features of uses of writing in engineering

Adapt writing to expectations in engineering

Use of technology in research and writing

Conventions of evidence, format, usage, & documentation in engineering

Development of technical writing skills

X

X

X

X

X

Various Crystal Structures

X

--

X

X

--

X-ray Powder Diffraction

X

X

X

X

X

Tensile Testing

X

X

X

X

X

Hardness and Microhardness

X

X

X

X

X

Diffusion

X

X

X

X

X

Fatigue Testing of Metallic Materials

X

X

X

X

X

Fracture, Ductile to Brittle Transition of Engineering Materials

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

Microstructure of Ferrous Alloys

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

Microstructure of Non-Ferrous Alloys

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

Microstructure of Polymeric Materials

X

X

X

X

X

Structure and Properties of Wood

X

X

X

X

X

Corrosion and Degradation of Metallic Materials

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

  1. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields.
  2. This course is a lecture-laboratory course. During the lecture hours students learn the theoretical background for the experiments they perform in the laboratory. The course has been assigned the most recent and advanced textbook on the subject matter. Several reference books are included for additional information. The laboratory activities include a total of twelve experiments. Students are required to write a complete laboratory report for each experiment.

     

     

  3. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields.
  4. Students are required to attend the lecture hours. The reports they write include an introduction section that covers the scientific background for the experiment. This obligates students to study the theoretical background of the experiment. In the Results and Discussion sections, students are required to implement their understanding of the background theory on analysis of the data they obtained from the experiments.

  5. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields.
  6. Students are provided with a handout explaining the format of the reports and the details to be included in each section of the report. The format is similar to the format of a research paper in an engineering journal.

     

  7. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields.
  8. The state-of-the-art equipment used for teaching some of the experiments for this course includes x-ray diffractometer, tensile, fatigue, hardness, microhardness, and microscopy testing units. The students use MS Word, Excel and other software to write their findings and produce professional reports.

     

  9. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

For the laboratory reports, students are required to include: Introduction, Experimental (Materials, Equipment, and Method), Results, Discussion, and References. In their results section, they are required to analyze their data and compare their results to the related published data. In the discussion sections they need to discuss the differences between their results and the published data, explain the reasons for the discrepancies, and identify the sources of error. This is an accepted technical writing method in the engineering field.

The Writing Center:

The English Department's Writing Center, located in Minné 340 and staffed primarily by graduate assistants in English, offers WSU students free, individualized instruction in all aspects of writing. You may visit the center on your own or on the recommendation of a teacher; you may "drop in," or you may sign up for a scheduled appointment; you may seek assistance with any aspect of your writing for any class or purpose. A schedule and sign-up sheet is posted on the Writing Center door each quarter. Call x5505 or email "wcenter@winona.edu" for appointments and information.

Online Service: http://phil.winona.edu/writingcenter/

Approval/Disapproval Recommendations

 

Department Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Dean's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved ____* Date:______

Dean's Signature_______________________ Date______

*In the case of a Dean's recommendation to disapprove a proposal a written rationale for the recommendation to disapprove shall be provided to USS

 

USS Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

University Studies Director's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

A2C2 Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date:______

A2C2 Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

FA President's Signature_______________________ Date______

Academic Vice President's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

VP's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

President's Decision: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

President's Signature_______________________ Date______