Approved by Faculty Senate.

University Studies Course Proposal

Department or Program: Engineering

Course Number: ENGR 452

Course Title: Mechanical Characterization Laboratory

Number of Credits: 2

Catalog Description: (2 S.H.) A lecture-laboratory course. Experimental characterization of composite materials, including density of fibers, fiber content, tension, compression, flexure, in-plane shear, interlaminar shear, fatigue and impact properties of composite materials. Effect of stress concentration in composites. Lamina thermoelastic and off-axis response, and nondestructive evaluations of composites. Emphasis on technical writing and preparation of laboratory reports. This course is one of four engineering courses that collectively satisfy 6 credits of the writing flag requirement in the University Studies Program.

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2 Yes.

OR

This is a new course proposal No . (If this is a new course proposal, the WSU Curriculum Approval Form must also be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)

Department Contact Person for this course: Beckry Abdel-Magid

Email: beckry@winona.edu

 

The proposed course is designed to satisfy the requirements in (select one area only):

Course Requirements

A. Basic Skills: B. Arts & Sciences Core:

______ 1. College Reading and Writing ______ 1. Humanities

______ 2. Oral Communication ______ 2. Natural Science

______ 3. Mathematics ______ 3. Social Science

______ 4. Physical Development and Wellness ______ 4. Fine & Performing Arts

 

C. Unity and Diversity: D. Flagged Courses:

1. Critical Analysis ___X__ 1. Writing

______ 2. Science and Social Policy ______ 2. Oral

______ 3. a. Global Perspectives ______ 3. a. Mathematics/ Statistics

______ b. Multicultural Perspectives ______ b. Critical Analysis

______ 4. a. Contemporary Citizenship

______ b. Democratic Institutions

 

 

 

 

 

Course Syllabus

ENGR 452 - Mechanical Characterization Laboratory, Fall 2001

 

2 Credits Lecture: 11:00 -11:50 M Room: Stark 205

Lab: Section 1 12:00 -1:50 pm M Stark 124

Section 2 12:00 -1:50 pm W Stark 124

Instructor: Beckry Abdel-Magid, Stark 203E

Office Hours: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm WF

       3:00 pm - 5:00 pm MTWF

References: 1. L.A. Carlsson and R.B. Pipes, Experimental Characterization of Advanced Composite Materials, Prentice-Hall, 1987.

2. Agarwal and Broutman, Analysis and Performance of Fiber Composites, 2nd Edition, Wiley, 1990.

3. ASTM Standards and Literature References for Composite Materials, 2nd Edition, 1990.

SACMA Recommended Methods, Suppliers of Advanced Composites Materials Association.

Catalog Description:

ENGR 452 Mechanical Characterization Laboratory - 2 S.H.

A lecture-laboratory course. Determination of density of fibers, fiber and matrix contents, tension, compression, flexure, and shear properties of composite materials. Determination of fatigue and impact properties, stress concentration, lamina thermoelastic and off-axis response, and nondestructive evaluations of composites. Emphasis on technical writing and preparation of laboratory reports. This course is one of four engineering courses that collectively satisfy 6 credits of the writing flag requirement in the University Studies Program. Prerequisites: ENG 111 College Reading and Writing, ENGR 260 Mechanics of Materials, ENGR 360 Introduction to Composite Materials, and STAT 303 Introduction to Engineering Statistics.

Course Objectives:

This course is designed to give junior and senior students in composite materials engineering an ability to experimentally characterize composite and other anisotropic materials. Students will be able to prepare specimens, perform tests and reduce the data to determine the mechanical properties of composite materials. An integral objective of this course is to learn to write laboratory reports, improve technical writing skills, reduce and present data in scientific, concise and professional manner.

This is a University Studies Program Writing Flag course. It satisfies 2 credits of the writing flag requirement. The objective of this requirement is to promote students’ abilities to:

  1. practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields
  1. understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields
  2. adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields
  3. make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields
  4. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

Course Outline:

1. Density of High-Modulus Fibers. Determination of the density of any continuous or discontinuous high-modulus fibers using the ASTM D 3800-79 Standard Test Method.

2. Determination of Fiber Volume Fraction. Volume fractions of the constituents of a composite using two test methods: the matrix burn-off method and the photomicrographic technique.

3. Strain Gage Measurements. Measurements of strains in any structural specimen using electrical resistance strain gages.

4. Lamina Tensile Response. Determination of the tensile properties of a single lamina using strain gages on test coupons. Young's moduli in longitudinal and transverse directions, major and minor Poisson's ratios, and the tensile strength of a lamina.

5. Lamina Compressive Response. Determination of the compressive properties of a unidirectional lamina. Compressive moduli and compressive strength of a lamina using strain gages.

6. Lamina Flexural Response. Determination of the stress-strain response of a lamina in bending and measure the flexural modulus and the flexural strength in the fiber direction.

7. In-plane Shear Stress-Strain Response. Determination of the in-plane shear stress-strain properties of a unidirectional lamina. In-plane shear modulus, in-plane shear strength, and maximum in-plane shear strain of a unidirectional reinforced lamina.

8. Short-Beam Shear. Determination of the apparent interlaminar shear strength of oriented fiber-resin composites using the Short-Beam Test Method.

9. Stress Concentration. Study of various conditions of stress concentration in composites, and how to determine the tensile properties of oriented fiber-resin composite laminates containing a circular hole.

10. Tension-Tension Fatigue Test. Determination of the tension-tension fatigue properties of oriented fiber composites using ASTM D 3479-76 Standard Test Method.

11. Data Acquisition. Introduction to laboratory software using LabView. Virtual instruments, editing and debugging virtual instruments, and an introduction to data acquisition systems..

12. Lamina Off-Axis Response. Using stress-strain response of the off-axis specimen subjected to axial tension, the student will be able to characterize the shear coupling phenomenon, and measure the off-axis modulus and off-axis strength of a lamina.

13. Impact Testing. Charpy, Izod and the Drop-Weight impact tests will be introduced. The drop-weight impact test will be used to measure the load-time curve.

14. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Composite Materials. An overview of damage identification in composites using ultrasonic techniques, acoustic emission techniques, imbedded fiber optics, and x-ray direction.

Course Requirements and Means of Evaluation:

Requirements: Attendance in all lectures; Performance of experiments; and

Submission of fourteen laboratory reports

Evaluation: Laboratory experiments, group work, and

communication of data 15%

Laboratory Reports 65%

Final Exam 20%

Total 100%

A grade of: 90 or above is A, 80 or above is B, 70 or above is C, 60 or above is D

Contribution of Course to Writing Flag Requirements:

Topic

Outcome

Course 3/4. Composites Characterization Techniques

Creating & completing successful writing

Understand features of uses of writing in engineering

Adapt writing to expectations in engineering

Use of technology in research and writing

Conventions of evidence, format, usage, & documentation in engineering

Density of high-modulus fibers

X

X

X

X

X

Determination of fiber volume fraction

X

X

X

X

X

Lamina tensile response

X

X

X

X

X

Lamina compressive response

X

X

X

X

X

Lamina flexural response

X

X

X

X

X

In-plane shear stress-strain response

X

X

X

X

X

Short-beam shear

X

X

X

X

X

Stress concentration

X

X

X

X

X

Tension-tension fatigue test

X

X

X

X

X

Lamina thermoelastic response

X

X

X

X

X

Lamina off-axis response

X

X

X

X

X

Impact testing and non-destructive evaluation of composite materials

X

X

X

X

X

 

  1. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields.
  2.  

    In each topic and each week of the semester students conduct an experiment and write a complete report describing the test procedure, the analysis of results, and the conclusions of the experiment. The format of the reports is similar to technical and professional reports in engineering practice and scientific journals in the engineering field.

  3. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields.
  4. Students are required to follow the technical report-writing standards in the field of engineering. Each report includes a cover letter, title page, table of contents, introduction, procedure, results, discussion and conclusions. These sections constitute the main features of writing in the engineering and scientific fields.

  5. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields.
  6. In preparing their reports, the students organize the contents and write the texts considering the standpoint of the reader. The reader is interested in the nature of the problem, the method used to attack the problem, the results obtained, and the experimenter's analysis of the results. In addition, the findings of the investigation should be clearly illustrated and defended. Usually, results are backed by similar findings in the published literature or a scientific justification is provided to explain the anomalies.

     

  7. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields.
  8. For each topic, the students are required to read the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards and specifications, perform research on the materials to be tested, conduct the tests, and compare their results with published values in the literature. In this exercise, students use library search, engineering index data search and various Web searches. Students use state-of-the-art data acquisition systems, such as INSTRON, MTS TESTWORKS and LABVIEW, and up-to-date software to perform their analyses and write their reports. Students are also required to consult with the writing lab in Minne 340 to discuss their writing styles and edit their reports.

     

  9. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

In each topic, students are required to discuss their findings, and address the specific questions forwarded in the assignment. If the answers do not adequately cover the important aspects of the results, these are covered in addition. The discussion is based on both the results of laboratory work and similar work reported in the literature. Attempts should be made to explain observed anomalies. Particularly worthwhile points of discussion are: accuracy and practical significance of laboratory results. A good amount of literature research is desirable in most cases. In the conclusions section, students are required to provide a summary of the major findings and the significant implications of their test results.

 

The guidelines of the preparations of the laboratory reports are attached.

Department of Engineering

ENGR 452 - Mechanical Characterization Laboratory

PREPARATION OF LABORATORY REPORTS

ORGANIZATION AND CONTENT

In preparing a report, the organization should be considered from the standpoint of the reader. He/she is interested in the nature of the problem, the method used to attack the problem, the results obtained, and the experimenter's analysis of the results. Therefore, the report should have the following form:

Cover Letter. Response to company requesting the test services. May include a brief summary of major findings.

Title Page. This page should indicate the project, author's name, date, and course.

Table of Contents. Include titles, subtitles, appendices and page numbers.

Introduction. The nature of the project should be described briefly. Normally a few sentences will be sufficient, unless some unusual features are involved. The composite used in the test should be described in detail under this heading; this description should be based primarily on three major items: fiber classification, matrix composition, and composite type (such as prepreg, short fiber, etc.). Additional pertinent adjectives can be used, where applicable, to describe items such as: generic name, orientation, or structure.

Procedure. Standard procedures already described in textbooks or class notes need not be rewritten in the report, but they may be simply referenced. However, specific test conditions should be noted, and special aspects involved in the procedure, and not covered elsewhere, should be described.

Results. Only the final summary of results, usually either in tabular or graphical form, should be shown in this portion of the report. All other preliminary results should appear in an appendix. No results or computations of any type should be omitted from the appendix, except for the summary of results appearing in the report proper.

Discussion. There may be specific questions concerning the project, and these should be answered carefully. If the answers do not adequately cover the important aspects of the results, these should be covered in addition. Such discussion should be based on both the results of laboratory work and similar work reported in the literature. Attempts should be made to explain observed anomalies. Particularly worthwhile points of discussion are accuracy and practical significance of laboratory results. A limited amount of literature research is desirable in most cases.

Conclusions. A brief summary of the major findings and the significant implications of the test results (one paragraph, or two at the most).

References. A reference list indicating all sources of information used for the report should be given. The format of the references list should be consistent in itself and according to some standard style, one acceptable example of which is included with these instructions. Number the references and refer to each reference by the corresponding number or by the name of the author.

Appendix (or Appendices). This portion of the report should contain all laboratory sheets, calculations, secondary results, instruction sheets, and relevant data not of sufficient importance to appear in the report proper.

GENERAL FORM

Neatness. Neatness is a habit developed by conscious effort. Consequently, there is no excuse for an untidy report. Typing is required. Coordination with the Writing Lab is strictly recommended. Greater attention should be given to neatness in the more important parts of the report (e.g., Title Page, Results, etc.). The laboratory sheets, on which original readings and computations are recorded, may be submitted in their original form as an appendix to the report. An effort should be made to be neat when completing these sheets in the laboratory. It is also essential that each sheet be complete with regard to sample number, date, etc.

Graphs. Graphs are frequently the most important part of the report, since they often summarize the results of the work. Therefore, a carefully considered presentation is vital. Important points to be followed in drawing graphs include the following:

1. Provide a prominent and descriptive title.

2. Clearly indicate coordinate scales and appropriate units.

3. Where a curve is based on a formulation, show a line only; do not show points through which the line is drawn.

4. Show points corresponding to experimental data clearly and distinctly; then, use a smooth prominent curve to indicate the trend suggested by these points.

5. The scale projections or grid lines crossing the graph should be thin lines which are insignificant in comparison to the curve indicating the results.

6. All curves should be drawn with a french curve, if necessary.

7. Curves and points representing different portions of the work should preferably be differentiated by use of different symbols or color print.

8. At least one inch of clear margin is desirable on all sides of the graph.

9. Pages which are read from the side should be placed with the bottom at the right-hand, or unbound, side.

Tables. When the results are reported in tabular form, titles and linework should be given care similar to that used for graphs. Thicker lines should separate major groupings, with thinner lines used elsewhere.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Further information on report writing may be found in many appropriate texts, (1,2,3).

REFERENCES

1. Lesikar, R.V., (1984). How To Write a Report Your Boss Will Read and Remember, Dow Jones-Irwin, Homewood, Illinois.

2. Michaelson, H., (1989). How To Write and Publish Engineering Papers and Reports, Oryx Press, Phoenix, Arizona.

3. Mali, P., and Sykes, R., (1985). Writing and Wordprocessing for Engineers and Scientists, McGraw-Hill, New York, New York.

Approval/Disapproval Recommendations

 

Department Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Dean's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved ____* Date:______

Dean's Signature_______________________ Date______

*In the case of a Dean's recommendation to disapprove a proposal a written rationale for the recommendation to disapprove shall be provided to USS

 

USS Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

University Studies Director's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

A2C2 Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date:______

A2C2 Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

FA President's Signature_______________________ Date______

Academic Vice President's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

VP's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

President's Decision: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

President's Signature_______________________ Date______