Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

University Studies Course Approval

Department or Program: Engineering

Course Number: ENGR 480

Course Title: Design Project II

Number of Credits: 3

Catalog Description: (3 S.H.) Develop product from requirements definition through prototype fabrication. Including: definition of product requirements, development of product and tooling design, analysis, definition of fabrication process, development of quality assurance plan, fabrication of prototype, inspection and testing. Work is performed in student teams. Design Project II is one of three engineering courses that collectively satisfy 3 credits of the Science and Social Policy requirement in the University Studies Program.

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2. Yes.

OR

This is a new course proposal No. (If this is a new course proposal, the WSU Curriculum Approval Form must also be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)

Department Contact Person for this course: Keith T. Dennehy

Email: kdennehy@winona.edu

 

 

The proposed course is designed to satisfy the requirements in (select one area only):

Course Requirements

A. Basic Skills: B. Arts & Sciences Core:

______ 1. College Reading and Writing ______ 1. Humanities

______ 2. Oral Communication ______ 2. Natural Science

______ 3. Mathematics ______ 3. Social Science

______ 4. Physical Development and Wellness ______ 4. Fine & Performing Arts

 

C. Unity and Diversity: D. Flagged Courses:

1. Critical Analysis ______ 1. Writing

___X_ 2. Science and Social Policy ______ 2. Oral

______ 3. a. Global Perspectives ______ 3. a. Mathematics/ Statistics

______ b. Multicultural Perspectives ______ b. Critical Analysis

______ 4. a. Contemporary Citizenship

______ b. Democratic Institutions

Course Syllabus

Please see http://course1.winona.edu/kdennehy and select the ENGR 480 – Design Project II link.

Prerequisites by Course(s) and Topic(s):

Admission to the CME Major

ENGR 390 – Composites Manufacturing

Topics:

1. Flow of a product through a manufacturing facility

2. Processes used to manufacture composites and composite sandwich products

3. Finishing techniques used in the manufacture of composite products

4. Methods used in the assembly of composite piece parts

Textbook(s) and/or Other Required Materials:

web site: http://course1.winona.edu/kdennehy

Coordinator(s):

Keith T. Dennehy, Professor

Course Objectives:

The objective of the two course series, Design Project I and II, is to develop the skills necessary to produce an effective design in response to an open-ended engineering problem. Design includes: recognition of the need, definition of design requirements and goals, development of design concepts, application of a decision process in the evaluation of the design concepts, and the integration of design with the other phases in the development of a product (i.e. tooling, manufacturing, quality assurance, etc.). The courses have the ancillary objectives of developing skills in technical writing, in technical presentations and in effectively functioning within a team. Design Project II uses an industry-sponsored design project as the foundation of the course.

Topics Covered

recognizing need

reviewing competing products and prices

soliciting customer input

defining design concerns - requirements and goals

developing preliminary designs

performing analysis

the decision process - evaluating performance of preliminary designs with respect to design concerns

describing the final design

design review

developing process specifications

designing and manufacturing tools and fixtures

developing a quality assurance plan

manufacturing readiness review

manufacturing, inspecting, and testing a qualification unit

manufacturing and inspecting a first article unit

Contribution of Course to Meeting the Science and Social Policy Requirements:

Topic

Outcome

Course 3/3. Design Project II

Scientific foundation of topic

Social, ethical, historical and/or political implication

Integrating science with social policy

Evaluate policy options and social dilemmas

Articulate, choose, and defend policy or scientific options

recognizing need

X

       

reviewing competing products and prices

X

X

     

soliciting customer input

X

X

     

defining design concerns - requirements and goals

X

 

X

   

developing preliminary designs

X

     

X

performing analysis

X

       

The decision process - evaluating performance of preliminary designs with respect to design concerns

X

     

X

describing the final design (engineering drawings)

X

   

X

 

design review

       

X

developing process specifications

X

 

X

X

X

designing and manufacturing tools and fixtures

X

       

developing a quality assurance plan

X

       

manufacturing readiness review

       

X

manufacturing, inspecting, and testing a qualification unit

X

 

X

X

 

manufacturing and

inspecting a first article

unit

X

 

X

   

 

 

  1. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to understand the scientific foundation of the topic.
  2. This course is structured so that the students have the opportunity to directly engage in the engineering design/development process. An industry-sponsor presents a team of students with a design problem and the students, working through each of the stages of the design/development process, end up producing a working prototype to present to the industry-sponsor. All of the topics included in the course when taken together represent the design/development process. It is through these highly hands-on activities that the students come to understand the engineering design/development process.

  3. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to understand the social, ethical, historical, and/or political implications.
  4. The students work closely with the industry-sponsor to gain insight into the problem. The students are expected to talk directly to the sponsoring industry’s engineers, manufacturing personnel, management, etc. to learn the history of the design problem presented. The students also review competing products to learn how those products have been received in the marketplace. Students contact end customers to determine their views on the important design requirements and goals (needs and wants).

  5. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to understand and articulate the need to integrate issues of science with social policy.
  6. There are seven design concern categories that the students need to evaluate when determining the requirements and goals of their proposed designs. In one of these categories, "life cycle," students are asked to consider such issues as the ability to recycle the materials used in the design, minimizing the use of hazardous materials, and ease of servicing a product to promote extended life. In a second category, "human engineering," students consider issues such as ergonomics and product safety.

     

    Students have to develop a process specification and fabricate the design they propose. Students have to work directly with the materials proposed in their designs. They have to review the Material Safety Data Sheets and wear the recommended personnel protective equipment (i.e. breathing apparatus) and properly dispose of any waste materials. This experience sensitizes the students to the social implications of proposing the use of materials that require special handling and disposal.

  7. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to evaluate the various policy options relevant to the social dilemmas posed by the science.
  8. The composites industry is constantly undergoing new and revised environmental and safety regulations. Students see firsthand the implications of this regulation as they chose the materials and manufacturing process(es) that will be used in their designs.

    The proposed designs also undergo testing. If a proposed design fails in some manner, then the students are faced with the dilemma of revising the design, most likely increasing the cost, or leaving the design as is and hoping the customer does not experience the same type of failure when using the product.

     

  9. Requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to articulate, choose among, and defend various policy and/or scientific options to cope with the challenges created.

Students work in teams throughout the course. The student teams are confronted with many choices as they work toward producing a prototype. Students must first reach consensus within their teams on the decisions leading up to the final design and the choice of process(es) used to manufacture the prototype. Then they have to articulate the reasons for their decisions to the industry-sponsor through formal presentations referred to as the Design Review and the Manufacturing Readiness Review.

 

Approval/Disapproval Recommendations

 

Department Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Dean's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved ____* Date:______

Dean's Signature_______________________ Date______

*In the case of a Dean's recommendation to disapprove a proposal a written rationale for the recommendation to disapprove shall be provided to USS

 

USS Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

University Studies Director's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

A2C2 Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date:______

A2C2 Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

FA President's Signature_______________________ Date______

Academic Vice President's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

VP's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

President's Decision: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

President's Signature_______________________ Date______