Approved by Faculty Senate.

University Studies Course Approval

 

Department or Program English

Course Number 210

Semester Hours 3

Frequency of Offering every semester

Course Title Advanced Expository Writing

Catalog Description An advanced course in writing essays, stressing the development of a mature writing style and evaluative abilities. Grade only. Prerequisite: ENG. 111.

This is an existing course previously Yes

approved by A2C2:

This is a new course proposal: No

Proposal Category: Unity & Diversity/Critical Analysis

Departmental Contact: Sandra Bennett

Email address: sbennett@winona.edu

 

English 210

Advanced Expository Writing—3 s.h.

A Unity & Diversity/Critical Analysis Course

Proposal and Rationale

Catalog Description

An advanced course in writing essays, stressing the development of a mature writing style and evaluative abilities. Grade only. Prerequisite: ENG. 111.

General Course Information

Students who take this course will develop skills of critical reading and writing in a number of genres and styles. Personal, informative, and persuasive readings are analyzed and discussed, and students respond to and critique them in writing assignments. Students review citation and bibliography styles such as MLA, APA, and CBE and use appropriate formats to document research projects. Individual and group projects are assigned, and students produce materials in collaborative settings. While assigned readings may have thematic unity (gender, race, etc.), assignments also allow students to utilize materials in their particular fields of study.

Rationale

USP Course Objective: This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to

a. evaluate the validity and reliability of information;

Readings are analyzed in the context of their use of evidence, and students learn to evaluate sources based on historical context, political bias, and other criteria.

 

b. analyze modes of thought, expressive works, arguments, explanations, or theories;

Texts chosen for this class are collections of personal, informative, and persuasive writings which demonstrate a broad range of styles, periods, and factual evidence as utilized in different modes of expository writing.

 

c, d. recognize possible inadequacies or biases in the evidence given to support arguments or conclusions and advance and support claims;

Through reading and analysis of assigned texts and materials located through their research, students acquire a broad basis for analyzing and critiquing sources. Individually and in collaborative projects, they write papers which utilize primary and secondary source materials to advance and support persuasive hypotheses.

English 210: Advanced Expository Writing: Sample Syllabus

(Content will differ by instructor)

Texts: Ashton-Jones, Olson, Perry, eds., The Gender Reader, 2nd ed.

Wilhoit, A Brief Guide to Writing from Readings, 2nd ed.

 

Class requirements:Assignments 1-4: 15% each

Assignment 5: 25%

Daily assignments & class participation: 15%

 

Course objectives: To develop critical reading, thinking, and writing skills which can be applied in a variety of fields. Class will focus on writing for exploration and change, problem-solving, and community improvement, using gender issues as a topic through which to engage questions and discussions.

 

Attendance will be taken daily. You are allowed two unexcused absences; further absences without prior instructor approval will result in a lower final grade. If you are absent, it is your responsibility to catch up on classwork.

 

Rationale:

USP Course Objective: This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to

a. evaluate the validity and reliability of information;

Readings are analyzed in the context of their use of evidence, and students learn to evaluate sources based on historical context, political bias, and other criteria. As students proceed through the assigned readings, they are asked to perform various types of analysis, responding to issues such as evidence, style, audience, tone, and other features of expository writing.

 

b. analyze modes of thought, expressive works, arguments, explanations, or theories;

Texts chosen for this class are collections of personal, informative, and persuasive writings which demonstrate a broad range of styles, periods, and factual evidence as utilized in different modes of expository writing. This particular syllabus is based on readings on gender issues, so class discussion and assignments reflect that topic as focus.

 

c, d. recognize possible inadequacies or biases in the evidence given to support arguments or conclusions and advance and support claims;

Through reading and analysis of assigned texts and materials located through their research, students acquire a broad basis for analyzing and critiquing sources. Individually and in collaborative projects, they write papers which utilize primary and secondary source materials to advance and support persuasive hypotheses. The five assignments in this syllabus, augmented by a variety of daily writing activities done in class and as homework, require students to perform increasingly complex tasks using expository modes of writing supported by secondary source evidence.

 

Schedule:

Aug. 28-30: Introduction, survey of interests, diagnostic assignment.

Sept. 1-8: Wilhoit: Chapters 9,10,11. Sept. 4: Labor Day holiday.

Sept. 11-15: Wilhoit: Ch. 1& 2; Reader: essays by Adams, Weintraub in Ch. 1. Assignment 1 due Sept. 15.

Sept. 18-22: Wilhoit: Ch. 3; Reader: all essays in Ch. 2.

Sept. 25-29: Wilhoit: Ch. 4; Reader: essays by Brownmiller, Steinem in Ch. 3. Assignment 2 due Sept. 29.

Oct. 2-6: Wilhoit: Ch. 5; Reader: essays by Weitz, Hopkins in Ch. 4.

 

Oct. 9: Midterm holiday.

 

Oct. 11-13: No class. Individual conferences with instructor.

Oct. 16-20: Wilhoit: Ch. 6; Reader: essays by Millett in Ch. 5 and Douglass, Sanger ("Awakening and Revolt") in Ch. 6. Assignment 3 due Oct. 20.

Oct. 23-27: Wilhoit: Ch. 7; Reader: essays by Truth, Yamada, Hooks in Ch. 7.

Oct. 30-Nov. 3: Wilhoit: Ch. 8; Reader: essays by Nilsen, Miller & Swift ("Women and Names") in Ch. 8.

Nov. 6-8: Reader: all essays in Ch. 9. Assignment 4 due Nov. 8.

Nov. 10: Veterans Day holiday.

Nov. 13-15: Reader: all essays in Ch. 10.

Nov. 17-20: Reader: Essays by Syfers, Mainardi, Tannen in Ch. 11.

 

Nov. 22-24: Thanksgiving holiday

Nov. 27-Dec. 1: Reader: essays by Brophy, Goodman, Johnson in Ch. 12 and Lindholm & Lindholm, Daly in Ch. 13.

 

Dec. 4-6: No class. Instructor will be available during office hours for consultation on final assignment.

Dec. 8: Class presentations. Assignment 5 due in final form. Graded assignments may be picked up outside Minne 310 Dec. 12.

Assignments

Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the date due. If you miss class, hand in the assignment early or send it to class with someone trustworthy. Late assignments will be reduced in grade. All assignments must be typed, using 12-point type, double-spaced, with 1" margins.

 

1. Using MLA or APA style, assemble an annotated bibliography on gender as it relates to a particular topic; for example, gender and language, gender and the media, gender and the law, etc. A minimum of 6 sources will be necessary for a passing grade. Use a variety of types of sources to illustrate different formats. This assignment addresses course objectivea by having students examine and evaluate different types of evidence.

 

2. Using the annotated bibliography assembled for assignment 1, write a 3-4 page paper explaining the significance of the topic for discussion of gender issues. Use appropriate MLA or APA parenthetical citations within the text and include a copy of your bibliography, revised to eliminate any errors. DO NOT ADD material. . This assignment addresses course objective a. by having students examine and evaluate different types of evidence and utilize the results to construct a brief argumentative paper using selected sources to support a thesis.

 

3. Summarize three of the essays assigned in Chapters 1-5 of Gender Reader or three articles on gender from academic sources in your field in 1-2 pages each. If you choose the latter option, include copies of the three articles with your assignment. This assignment addresses course objective b. by having students do analytical reading of several sources and evaluate them for their primary arguments and evidence.

 

4. a. Critique an article dealing with gender issues from an academic source in your field; include a copy of the article with your assignment.

OR b. Critique a film, television movie, or television series, focussing on gender issues as portrayed in the material. Check with instructor before choosing this option.

Length 3-4pp for both options.

This assignment addresses course objectives c and d by having students evaluate and analyze the evidence presented in a text by using specific criteria.

 

5. As a group, choose an issue relating to gender and write a proposal

for a research project which would define and illuminate the issue for professionals in that field. Process:

a. Define the problem and discuss its significance to the field.

b. Determine the steps necessary to acquire data for an authoritative study and assemble a variety of source materials and information.

c. Suggest an hypothesis for the proposed project and discuss the problems in proving or disproving it, synthesizing material from several sources to support your hypothesis.

Final product will be an essay of 8-10 pp. including this and other relevant information, including a comprehensive bibliography. Results will be summarized in a group presentation to the class Dec. 8. This assignment addresses course objectives a,b,c, and d by having students evaluate, analyze, and synthesize sources and use primary and secondary evidence to support a thesis.

 

Assessment: Your grade on this project will be based on the following criteria: 50% on the quality of the presentation/product and 50% on an evaluation by the other members of your group of your contribution to the process. (All group members will receive the same evaluation for the product, but may receive differing evaluations for the process, resulting in a variety of grades for the project as a whole.)