Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

 

 

University Studies Course Approval--Critical Analysis Flag

 

Department or Program English

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Course Number 290

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Semester Hours 5

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Frequency of Offering each semester

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Course Title Literary Studies

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Catalog Description This course is an introduction to literary analysis and writing about literature, focusing upon the major genres: fiction, poetry, and drama.

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This is an existing course previously approved

by A2C2 Yes

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This is a new course proposal No

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Proposal category Critical Analysis Flag

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Department Contact Sandra Bennett

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Email Address sbennett@winona.edu

 

 

 

 

UNIVERSITY STUDIES CRITICAL ANALYSIS FLAG COURSE PROPOSAL AND RATIONALE

EN 290 Literary Studies

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General Rationale

EN 290 is required of all English majors and will prepare students for all upper division English courses by addressing the following objectives:

*Students understand the methods and strategies for literary analysis

* Students can apply strategies for literary analysis to a variety of literary works

* Students can recognize and apply the principles of effective written and oral response to various kinds of literature, using primary and secondary sources.

Critical analysis skills will be fostered and developed in this course in particular in the English curriculum.

This course merits the critical analysis flag in that it:

--will require students to understand and apply principles of genre identification

--will engage students in recognizing and analyzing differing approaches to issues of literary canon

--will introduce students to literary history and movements, issues of translation, and the various critical strategies for analyzing and describing features of literary genres

--will introduce students to critical approaches to literary analysis

--will demand student accountability and quality work in both written and oral analysis.

This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to

a. recognize and evaluate appropriate evidence to advance a claim.

Application of methods and strategies of analyzing literary works will include examination of differing views of the salient features of selected works from the three main genres: fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will be introduced to competing critical approaches and learn how to utilize a variety of methodologies in analyzing literary texts.

b. apply critical analytical skills in advancing a theoretical position.

Students in this course will engage in written and oral assignments which apply theoretical knowledge to analysis of literary texts. These will include three major essays, ten short writing assignments, tests, formal and informal class presentations, reading, and quizzes. See the attached syllabus (Appendix A) for detailed descriptions of assignments.

c. evaluate alternative arguments within a systematic framework.

By reading, discussing, and writing about literary texts, students will learn to incorporate evidence from primary and secondary sources in support of their own critical analysis. Such research will involve students in formulating, evaluating, and selecting arguments to present a coherent and convincing case for a particular critical approach to the text.

 

 

WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

Curriculum Approval Form

  1. Course Description—English 290
  1. Catalog Description:
  2. This course is an introduction to literary analysis and writing about literature, focusing upon the major genres of literatures: fiction, poetry, and drama.

  3. Statement of Major Focus and Objectives of the Course:

Focus: Students will be introduced to the following literary topics:

bulletThe importance of identifying historical and cultural context of literary works bulletIssues of literary canon bulletRole of individual authors: unique contributions/style; authors’ response to literary movements bulletCharacteristics of various literary genres: learn about the unique demands of responding to each bulletMajor critical perspectives and the general relationship between a literary work and critical response to it bulletLiterary strategies: understanding and applying terms and strategies bulletWays to write about literature: types of responses, various formats, use of sources bulletUse of secondary sources and reference materials for literary study bulletPreparation for being an English major (introduction to the portfolio)

Objectives: This course prepares students of English for all upper division English courses by addressing the following objectives:

bulletStudents understand the methods and strategies for literary analysis bulletStudents can apply strategies for literary analysis to a variety of literary works bulletStudents can recognize and apply the principles of effective written and oral response to various kinds of literature, using primary and secondary sources
  1. Course Outline of the Major Topics and Subtopics:
    1. Methods and strategies for literary analysis:
    1. Genre identification:
    1. Fiction
    1. Elements of fiction
    2. Types of fiction
    1. Poetry
    1. Elements of poetry
    2. Types of poetry
    1. Drama
    1. Elements of drama
    2. Types of drama
    1. Issues of canon
    2. Importance of historical and cultural context
    1. Introduction to literary history and literary movements
    2. Issues of translation
    3. Identifying authors’ style, unique literary contributions, and response to historical/cultural context
    1. Introduction to critical approaches
    1. Application of methods and strategies to literary works:
    1. Fiction
    1. Character
    2. Plot
    3. Setting
    4. Theme
    5. Point of view
    6. Tone
    7. Symbolism
    1. Poetry
    1. Sound and sense in poetry
    2. Voice in poetry
    3. Rhyme and meter in poetry
    4. Fixed forms in poetry
    5. Imagery in poetry
    6. Figures of speech in poetry
    7. Symbol, allegory, myth and allusion in poetry
    8. Poetry in translation
    1. Drama
    1. Conventions of drama: staging, use of dialogue, use of language
    2. Tragedy/comedy
    3. Dramatic history: Greek, Shakespearean, Neoclassical, realistic, modern
    4. Analyzing a drama and using secondary sources related to it
    1. Responding to Literature:
    1. Types of response:
    1. Summary response
    2. Prose analysis
    3. Explication of poem
    4. Types of formal essays: analytical (formalist), comparative analysis, critical approach/argument (applying particular critical approach), multiple source
    5. Making oral presentations
    1. Principles of effective response (written and oral)
    2. Use of sources: primary, secondary sources
    1. Introduction to being a student of English:

4. Basic Instructional Plan and Methods Used: The following methods of instruction will be used:

bulletClass lecture bulletGroup and class discussions based on primary and secondary sources and background materials bulletLibrary orientation and introduction to use of reference materials for study of literature and use of secondary sources bulletVideos

5. Course Requirements:

bulletThree major essays (3 major genres; 3 major types of responses) bulletTen short writing assignments (practice in applying literary strategies and using various types of responses) bulletTwo tests (fiction/poetry) and final exam bulletClass presentation (one formal and several informal) bulletReadings and quizzes
  1. Textbooks: Individual instructors will select a specific text [sample provided] for each of the following categories:
bulletAnthology: Sven P. Birkerts, Literature: The Evolving Canon, 2nd ed. + Casebook on "’Master Harold’…and the boys" bulletHandbook of Literary Terms: Hugh Harmon and William Harmon, A Handbook to Literature, 7th ed. bulletText on Writing about Literature: Michael Meyer, Thinking and Writing about Literature bulletGeneral Writing Handbook: Diana Hacker, A Writer’s Reference

 

 

7. List of References:

bulletAtkin, Graham, Chris Walsh, Susan Watkins. Studying Literature: A Practical Introduction. Hempel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1995. bulletBooth, W. The Rhetoric of Fiction. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1991. bulletCarter, R. and P. Simpson, eds. Language Discourse and Literature. London: Unwin Hyman, 1989. bulletDawson, S. W. Drama and the Dramatic. London: Methuen, 1970. bulletEagleton, T. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Basil Blackwell, 1983. bulletEsslin, M. An Anatomy of Drama. London: Temple Smith, 1976. bulletEsslin, M. The Field of Drama. London: Methuen, 1987. bulletFish, S. Is There a Text in This Class?: The Authority of Interpretive Communities. Cambridge, Mass. And London: Harvard UP, 1980. bulletGenette, G. Narrative Discourse. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1980. bulletHarrison, N. Successful Writing. Ely: Peter Francis Publishers, 1987. bulletHawthorn, J. A Concise Glossary of Contemporary Literary Theory. London: Edward Arnold, 1992. bulletHayman, R. How to Read a Play. London: Methuen, 1977. bulletKelsall, M. Studying Drama. London: Edward Arnold, 1985. bulletLodge, D. Modern Criticism and Theory: A Reader. London: Longman, 1988. bulletLucas, J. Modern English Poetry from Hardy to Hughes. London: Batsford, 1986. bulletMcCormick, K., G. Waller and L. Flower. Reading Texts: Reading, Responding, Writing. Lexington, Mass. And Toronto: D.C. Heath & Co., 1987. bulletMiller, R. and R.A. Greenberg. Poetry, An Introduction. Basingstoke and London: Macmillan, 1985. bulletMilroy, J. and L. Milroy. Authority in Language. London: Routledge, 1985. bulletMontgomery, M, A. Burant, N. Fabb, and S. Mills. Ways of Reading: Advanced Reading Skills for Students of English Literature. London and New York: Routledge, 1992. bulletNewton, K. M. Interpreting the Text: A Critical Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Literary Interpretation. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1990. bulletPirie, D. How to Write Critical Essays. London: Methuen, 1985. bulletProtherough, R. Students of English. London and New York: Routledge, 1989. bulletQuinn, K. How Literature Works. Basingstoke and London: Macmillan, 1992. bulletRimmon-Kenan, S. Narrative Fiction: Contemporary Poetics. London: Nethuen, 1983. bulletScholes, R. and R. Kellog. The Nature of Narrative. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1966. bulletSelden, R. Practising Theory and Reading Literature: An Introduction. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1989.

Video Resources:

bulletLiterary Visions – 12 vol. Series
  1. Rationale:
  2. In the past, students of English have been required to take English 201(Writing about Literature) and English 210 (Advanced Expository Writing). Through the departmental assessment process, we have learned that students would benefit from a more intense and coordinated orientation to the study of literature and response to it. English 290 (5 credits) replaces English 201 (3 credits) and English 210 (3 credits) as the foundation course for all students of English, providing a more concentrated introduction to the elements of literary analysis and more guidance and experience with responding effectively to literature.

  3. Notification: Does not apply
  4. "G" Courses: Does not apply
  5. General Education/University Studies Course Proposals:

This course will be submitted for University Studies Program approval: Critical Analysis flag.

English 290--Literary Studies

Course Information

 

Instructor: Office Hours:

Office:

Tel:

E-mail:

Course Description:

This course is an introduction to literary analysis and writing about literature, focusing upon the major genres of literature: fiction, drama, and poetry.

Course Objectives: Students will be introduced to the following literary topics:

bulletThe importance of identifying historical and cultural context of literary works bulletIssues of literary canon bulletRole of individual authors: unique contributions/style; response to literary movements bulletCharacteristics of various literary genres: learn about the unique demands of responding to each bulletMajor critical perspectives and the general relationship between a literary work and critical responses to it bulletLiterary strategies: understanding and applying terms and strategies bulletWays to write about literature: types of responses, various formats, use of sources, etc. bulletUse of secondary sources and reference materials for literary study

Texts:

bulletSven P. Birkerts, Literature: The Evolving Canon. 2nd ed. bulletHugh Harmon and William Harmon, A Handbook to Literature 7th ed. bulletMichael Meyer, Thinking and Writing about Literature bulletDiana Hacker, A Writer’s Reference

Course Requirements: [550 pts. Total]

bulletReadings/Reading Quizzes [70 pts]:
You are responsible for the readings listed on the syllabus. Periodically there will be unannounced quizzes on the readings; These quizzes cannot be made up. bulletShort Assignments [10 assignments x 10 pts each = 100 pts total]: You will be assigned ten short writing assignments which are listed on the course schedule. bulletEssays--Three major essays [50 pts/ 60 pts/ 70 pts = 180 pts. total]: Topics and instructions for the essays will be given to you later in the semester. The due dates for the essays are listed on the course schedule. bulletTests--Two Tests [2 x 50 pts = 100 pts.] Two tests are listed on the course schedule. bulletClass Presentation [40 pts.] Each student will to assigned to a group to present a literary work to the class. Specific instructions will be distributed separately; the due dates for the presentations are listed on the course schedule. bulletFinal Exam [60 pts] The date for the final exam is listed on the course schedule.

Please Note:

bulletAttendance: You are responsible for all material discussed and dealt with in class and assignments made in class. There will be class and group discussions that will prepare you for the exams and the essays that you have to write. Also, no quizzes can be made up. bulletLate Papers: Papers that are turned in late will be dropped one grade unless arrangements for an extension are made prior to the due date. Unless special arrangements are made, papers will not be accepted beyond one week of the due date. bulletAll major course requirements (papers, tests, final exam) must be completed in order to pass the course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of English: Critical Analysis Flag Course Information

English 290: Literary Studies

 

General Objectives for English 290

English 290 is required of all English majors and minors and prepares students for all upper division English courses by addressing the following general objectives:

bulletStudents understand the methods and strategies for literary analysis bulletStudents can apply strategies for literary analysis to a variety of literary texts bulletStudents can recognize and apply the principles of effective written and oral response to various kinds of literature, using primary and secondary sources.

Specific Objectives and Critical Analysis Skills for English 290:

English 290 addresses the following specific course objectives:

bulletThe course requires students to understand and apply principles of genre identification bulletThe course engages students in recognizing and analyzing differing approaches to issues of literary canon bulletThe course introduces students to literary history and movements, issues of translation, and the various critical strategies for analyzing and describing features of literary genres bulletThe course introduces students to critical approaches to literary analysis bulletThe course demands student accountability and quality work in both written and oral analysis

Critical Analysis Flag Designation:

As a Critical Analysis Flag Course in the University Studies Program, English 290 includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ ability to…

  1. recognize and evaluate appropriate evidence to advance a claim. Application of methods and strategies of analyzing literary works will include examination of differing views of the salient features of selected works from the three main genres: fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will be introduced to competing critical approaches and learn how to utilize a variety of methodologies in analyzing literary texts.
  2. apply critical analytical skills in advancing a theoretical position. Students in this course will engage in written and oral assignments which apply theoretical knowledge to analysis of literary texts. These will include three major essays, ten short writing assignments, tests, formal and informal class presentations, reading, and quizzes.
  3. Evaluate alternative arguments within a systematic framework. By reading, discussing, and writing about literary texts, students will learn to incorporate evidence from primary and secondary sources in support of their own critical analysis. Such research will involve students in formulating, evaluating, and selecting arguments to present a coherent and convincing case for a particular critical approach to the text.

English 290: Literary Studies

Course Syllabus: Fall Semester 2001

 

Date Topics Assignments (SA=Short Assignment)

Aug. 27 Intro to course: Course requirements

Aug. 28 Responding to Literature; Reading Fiction Chapt. 1

Aug. 29 Intro. To Canon 1614-1636-Gates/Bloom;

Aug. 30 Views of the Canon / Reading and Writing Meyer: Chpt. 1

Aug. 31 Reading Fiction Chpt. 2

Sept. 4 Fiction: Character / Writing a Character Sketch Chpt. 3

Sept. 5 Writing about Fiction: Chapt. 10 (140-149); SA #1

Sept. 6 Types of writing Assigns. Meyer (23-32)

Sept. 7 Fiction: Plot / Genre Chapt. 4

Sept. 10 Fiction: Setting Chapt. 5

Sept. 11 Importance of Context: Cultural/Historical Chapt. 10 (149-151)

Introduction to Literary History Harmon/Holman Ex.; Handout

Sept. 12 Writing about Fiction: Careful reading Meyer: Chpt. 3;

Sept. 13 Fiction: Theme Chapt. 6

Sept. 14 Literary Criticism: Critical Approaches Appendix A; Meyer: Chpt. 6

Sept. 17 Fiction: Point of View Chapt. 7;

Sept. 18 Writing about Fiction: Preparing a draft Chapt. 10 (151-157); SA #2

Sept. 19 Fiction: Tone / Analyzing Style Chapt. 8

Sept. 20 Writing about Fiction: Revision/Final Draft Chapt. 10 (158-160); Meyer: Chpt. 3

Sept. 21 Using Biographical Information Chpt. 12

Sept. 24 Fiction: Symbolism Chapt. 9

Sept. 25 Comparing approaches to Fiction / Essay exams Chpt. 4 (515-520); Meyer: Chpt. 9; SA #3

Sept. 26 Writing about Fiction / English Dept. Portfolio Topic for Fiction Paper; Chpt. 14 (509-515)

Sept. 27 Fiction Test

Sept. 28 Fiction Presentations Stories on assign. sheet

Oct. 1 Peer Evaluation of Drafts Draft of Fiction Paper

Oct. 2 Intro to Literary Movements Harmon/Holman Ex.

Oct. 3 Reading Poetry Chapt. 15; Meyer (55-61)

Oct. 4 Poetry: Sound and Sense Chapt. 16

Oct. 5 Poetry: Voice Chpt. 17; Fiction Paper Due

Oct. 8 Writing about Poetry / Explication Chapt. 24; Meyer: (18-22)

Oct. 9 Poetry: Rhyme and Meter Chapt. 18; SA #4

Oct. 10 Writing about Poetry / Comparison Chapt. 28 (971-975); Meyer (33-44)

Oct. 11 Poetry: Fixed Forms Chapt. 19

Oct. 15 Poetry: Imagery Chpt. 20

Oct. 16 Writing about Poetry: Writing the draft/revising Chapt. 28 (975-980)

Oct. 17 Poetry: Figures of Speech Chapt. 21

Oct. 18 Writing about Poetry: Approaches Chapt. 24 (718-720); SA #5

Oct. 19 Poetry: Symbol/allegory Chapt. 22; Select Topic for Poetry Paper

Oct. 22 Poetry: Use of Allusions/Identifying Influence Chpt. 22

Oct. 23 Poetry in Translation Chapt. 23

Oct. 24 Writing about Poetry Meyer (61-70); SA #6

Oct. 25 Poetry Presentations Poems on assign. sheet

Oct. 26 Peer evaluations of drafts Draft of Poetry Paper

Oct. 29 Individual Conferences Outline/Draft of Poetry Paper

Oct. 30 A Poet’s Career: Adrienne Rich Chapt. 25, 28 (985-993)

Oct. 31 Studying an Author in Depth Meyer: Chpt. 7

Nov. 1 Poetry Test

Nov. 2 Reading Plays and Watching Theater Chapt. 29; Chapt. 5

Nov. 5 Historical Developments in Drama Chapt. 30, 31, 33, 34, 35 (intro)

Nov. 6 Comedy / Tragedy Poetry Paper Due

Nov. 7 Library Orientation Appendix B; Meyer: Chapt. 8

Nov. 8-13 "A Doll’s House" –Ibsen Chpt. 34 (1308-1358); SA #7 (Nov. 9)

Nov. 14 Library Exercise

Nov. 15-19 "Master Harold and the Boys"—Fugard Chapt. 35 (1536-1568); SA #8 (Nov. 16)

Nov. 20 Using Secondary Sources Fugard Essays (Casebook); Topic for Essay 3

 

Nov. 26 Writing a multiple-source essay Meyer: Chpt. 8; Handbook

Nov. 27 Sources for Literary Research Appendix B

Nov. 28 Writing about drama Chapt. 36; 37 (1610-1612)

Nov. 29 Library Assignment

Nov. 30 Integrating sources / Review of Canon SA # 9

Dec. 3 Peer Evaluation Draft of Essay 3

Dec. 4 Individual Conferences

Dec. 5 Preparation of final draft SA # 10; Handbook

Dec. 6 Drama Presentations see assign. sheet

Dec. 7 Preparation for final exam Drama Paper Due

Final Exam: Wednesday, Dec. 12 1:00-3:00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

English 290: Writing Assignments

 

Three Major Essays:

(Individual Assignments are attached)

Essay 1: Analysis of Fiction This assignment involves a critical analysis of a short story, using primarily a formalist approach.

Essay 2: Comparison Essay of Two Poems This assignment involves a critical analysis of two poems, using a comparison pattern of organization.

Essay 3: Multiple-Source Essay on a Drama This assignment focuses on the analysis of a play, using multiple secondary sources to support the thesis.

Short Writing Assignments:

These assignments give students practice in writing a wide range of typical responses/essay assignments required in advanced English courses; they exercise a variety of analytical and writing skills. In most cases, students write partial essays, using the skills they will need for the major essays.

Short Assignment #1: Character Sketch in Fiction: A partial character sketch of a character in a short story. The focus is on learning how to state points of analysis and support them with evidence drawn from the primary source. Students practice drawing generalizations, providing support, and integrating quotes.

Short Assignment #2 : Critical Analysis of Fiction: A partial analytical essay of a short story (students write an introductory paragraph and one paragraph of analysis supporting the thesis established in the introduction). Students practice writing effective introductions that establish a thesis for a critical analysis and practice organizing and developing support for the thesis.

Short Assignment #3: Prose Analysis (style): A partial prose analysis of a particular short story (students write two paragraphs that analyze style). Students practice identifying and supporting generalizations about the author’s style in a short story.

Short Assignment #4: Explication of Poem: A partial explication of a poem (students write an introductory paragraph for an explication essay of a poem and a paragraph explication of the first stanza of a poem). Students practice setting up the context for explicating a poem, applying the elements of explication, and integrating and citing quotations from poems.

Short Assignment #5: Critical Analysis of Poem (rhythm): A partial critical analysis essay of a poem (students write an introductory paragraph for a critical analysis of a poem and a paragraph in which they relate the use of rhythm in the poem to the theme established in the introduction). Students practice setting up a critical analysis of a poem, supporting a thesis with a point of analysis (use of rhythm) and developing a generalization with specifics drawn from the text (use and citation of primary source).

Short Assignment #6: Use of Allusion in Poems (comparison): A partial critical analysis essay that compares two poems (students write the introductory paragraph explaining the basis for comparison of two poems and one paragraph that compares the use of an allusion used in both poems. Students practice setting up a comparison essay on two poems and learn how to trace and evaluate the function of allusion in poetry.

Short Assignment #7: Using a Critical Approach in Drama Analysis: A partial essay that explores a drama by using a particular critical approach. Students write an introduction that establishes the critical approach to be used and sets up the context for how it will be applied in a specific play (students write an extended introduction--two paragraphs). Students practice summarizing/identifying a particular critical approach and practice setting up the context for using it to analyze a play.

 

Short Assignment #8: Annotated Bibliography: Students write an annotated bibliography of secondary sources (including reference materials) that are relevant to a multiple-source essay on a drama ("’Master Harold’... and the boys"). Students learn about the use of reference materials (biographical information, interviews with the author, sources for tracing allusions in the play, background information about Apartheid in South Africa, general information about social realism in modern drama/problem play genre, critical reviews of the play/reception of the production, etc.).

Short Assignment #9: Summary of Secondary Source for Drama Analysis: Each student writes a summary of one of the critical analysis essays in the Casebook on Fugard’s "’Master Harold’... and the boys." Students practice summarizing and identifying use/value of secondary sources.

Short Assignment #10: Using Multiple Sources for an Argument: Students write a partial essay in which they establish their view of the literary canon (they write an introduction establishing their general view and one paragraph of support, incorporating the views of at least two of the essays on canon collected in the text). Students practice setting up an argument and supporting ideas by integrating a number of secondary sources.