Approved by Faculty Senate

UNIVERSITY STUDIES COURSE APPROVAL

Department or Program: Foreign Languages

Course Number: 102 Number of Credits: 04

Course Title: Elementary German II

Catalog Description: Continuation of 101. Prerequisite : 101 or 2 years of high school German or equivalent. Offered yearly.

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2: yes

Send 10 copies to: Kelly Herold

This is a new course proposal: no (If this is a new course proposal, the WSU Curriculum Approval Form must also be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)

Department Contact Person for this course: Ronald Mazur, 310A Somsen

 

Email: rmazur@winona.edu

A2C2 requires 55 copies of new course proposals:

 

Addendum:

This paragraph will be added to the course description in the WSU UG Catalog for 2002-2004:

As the student learns the language he/she becomes acquainted with the way German people experience and perceive their world. Through the language, the student is introduced to the customs, the arts, and the culture of Germany and the rest of the German-speaking world.

 

 

102 – ELEMENTARY GERMAN II

This course fulfills four credits of the Arts and Sciences Core Requirement in the Humanities area of the University Studies Program

 

COURSE OUTLINE

Course: German 102, Elementary German II, 4 S.H.

Description: Continuation of 101. Prerequisite : 101 or 2 years of high school German or equivalent. Offered yearly.

 

Instructor: Dr. Ronald Mazur, Professor, Foreign Language Department

319A Somsen Hall. (507) 457-5165

Textbooks: Wie Geht’s, 6th ed. Savin/Sevin/Bean. Holt, Rinehart, Winston, 2000. Workbook and laboratory manual.

Material to

be covered: Chapters 8 through 15

Tests: One after "Schritte" and after each chapter.

The final examination is comprehensive (25% of the semester grade).

Course

Objectives: Aural Comprehension: The ability to understand spoken German dealing with everyday topics and occurrences at a moderate conversational speed.

Speaking: The ability to engage in simple conversations with speakers of German.

Reading: The ability to read nontechnical German of elementary difficulty.

Writing: The ability to write simple sentences correctly on the topics presented in the text.

These skills are not taught in a vacuum and their acquisition is not the sole objective of the course. The cultures realities of the German-speaking world are discussed from the outset and the language is taught as a means of experiencing, interpreting and participating in the target culture.

Learning

Activities and

Expectations: Aural Comprehension: Regular language laboratory work (one hour minimum per chapter) and appropriate spoken responses in German to instructor’s questions and statements are expected.

Speaking: Regular appropriate participation in classroom conversation in German as well as correct responses to oral exercises are expected. Errors in pronunciation or usage are corrected daily.

Reading: Comprehension of dialogues, reading passages and exercises will be tested by discussion, true and false questions, and content questions requiring elaboration (in German).

Writing: Daily homework assignments must be done in writing and will be corrected daily in class. All tests will require evidence of the ability to write correct German as a measure of reading comprehension and the mastery of grammar.

University Studies Requirements:

  1. Identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular Humanities discipline;

Through lectures, tests, classroom drills and discussions, students will learn the terminology and methodology of language acquisition and the details of grammatical analysis while gaining proficiency in the German language. They will come to appreciate the two-fold nature of language learning as motor-response activity and cognitive mastery. Through the correction of "interference" and by conscious analysis they will become aware of the features of language that have become automatic in their native language. They will also learn to see that a language is the clearest and most fundamental reflection of a culture’s civilization and social reality.

b. Understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations:

Through exercises and classroom discussion, students will learn that speakers of German classify, define structure, and conceptualize their world in categories that vary from their own and both establish and reflect different cultural, social, historical, and gender expectations. Through examples they will explore "invisible" cultural differences and learn how to deal with them constructively. Finally, they will study the contemporary cultures of the three major German speaking countries (Germany, Austria, Switzerland) with an eye to historical, social and linguistic differences despite the "common" language.

c. Understand the role of critical analysis (e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical, rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluation expressions of human experience.

As is clear from the information above, consistent comparison, analysis, and the training of students to produce correct interpretations of aesthetic, social and historical cultural and linguistic material are a fundamental aspect of this course. They will acquire the ability to understand and speak a new language actively, perceive and experience the world through the medium of a new language and culture, view their native language more objectively, and differentiate three different German-speaking cultures.

Humanities Requirements and Learning Activities Chart

  1. Identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular Humanities discipline
  2. Understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations
  3. Understand the role of critical analysis (e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical, rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expressions of human experience

102 – Elementary German II

Ch.

Preview

Conversation

Vocabulary

Grammatical

Structure

Insights

Focus

Conversation

Situations

8

 

A,B,C

Spotlight on

Switzerland

A,B,C

Postal service and travel

A,B

 

Genitive case

Time expressions

Sentence structure

Types & sequence of adverbs

Position of nicht

A

Switzerland and its languages

Tourists in Switzerland

B,C

Phoning & postal services

Train travel, Car travel

William Tell

Switzerland’s mountain world

Hermann Hesse "Im Nebel"

B,C

Expressing sympathy/lack of sympathy

Expressing empathy

Expressing relief

A,B

9

A,B,C

Sports & clubs in the German-speaking countries

A,B,C

Physical fitness & leisure time

A,B

Endings of preceded adjectives

Reflexive verbs

Infinitive with zu

A

Vacationing

Leisure time

Pleasure or

Frustration

B,C

Phone courtesies

Animal & food talk

Schreiberg�ren

Rose Ausl�nder

"Noch bist du da"

B,C

Speaking on the phone

Extending, accepting, declining an invitation

A,B

10

 

A,B,C

The magic of the theater

A,B

Entertainment

A,B

Verbs with prepositional objects

Da and wo compounds

Endings of unpreceded adjectives

A

German TV

Choosing isn’t easy

 

B.C

German film

The world of music

The art scene

German cabaret

Wolf Biermann "Ach freud, geht es nicht auch dir so?"

B,C

Expressing satisfaction/dissatisfaction

Expressing anger

A,B

11

A,B,C

Women & society

A,B,C

Relationships & character traits

A,B,C

Simple past

Conjunctions als, wann, wenn

Past perfect

A

The brothers Grimm and their fairy tales

Rumplestilzchen

B,C

Love & Marriage

Leichtenstein

Eva Strittmatter „Were"

B,C

Expressing admiration

Telling a story

Encouraging a speaker

A,B

12

 

A,B,C

German schools & vocational training

A,B

Professions and education

 

A,B,C

Comparison of adj. and adverbs

Future Tense

Nouns with special features

Predicate nouns

Adjectival nouns

A

Hard times and social policy

Choosing a profession

B,C

Women in business and industry

Gender bias & lang.

Foreign workers in Germany

Writing a resume

Suna Gollwitzer: "Totales Versagen"

A,B,C

Expressing agreement/disagreement

Expressing hesitation.

 

A,B

13

 

A,B,C

German Universities

A,B,C

University study and student life

A,B

Subjunctive mood

Present-time general subjunctive

Past-time general subjunctive

A

Studying in Germany

A year abroad

B,C

Red tape

Writing letters

Betroit Brecht

B,C

Giving advice

Asking for permission

Granting/denying permission

A,B

14

A,B,C

Chronicle of German history since WW II

A,B

A visit to Berlin

 

A,B

Relative clauses

Indirect speech

A

Berlin’s past

Berlin’s gate to the world

B,C

Berliners

Berlin today

Berlin, a multicultural melting pot

Erich K�stner: "fFantasie von �bermorgen"

B,C

Expressing doubt and uncertainty

Expressing probability and possibility

Expressing concern

Drawing conclusions

A,B

15

A,B,C

The path to a united Europe

A,B,C

Nature and environmental protection

A,B,C

Passive voice

Review of the uses of werden

Special subjunctive

A

In search of an identity

The wind knows no borders

B,C

Cultural capital Weimar

The German spelling reform

Goethe "Erinneriung Schiller. „Ode an de Freude"

A,B,C

Describing objects

A,B

 

Test Make-Up Policy: Students must request permission to take a make-up test by the first class period following the test missed. Otherwise a grade of ‘0" will be recorded for the test.

Attendance: Regular attendance, prepared class participation, and language laboratory work are required. Regular interactive classroom work is essential for language learning. The course’s objectives cannot be achieved without it.