Approved by Faculty Senate

University Studies Course Approval

 

Program: Geography

Course Number: 213

Semester Hours: 3

Frequency of offering: every semester

Course Title: Cultural Geography

Catalog Description: An introduction to the significance and areal distribution of various cultural elements of our environment with emphasis on population, cultural origins, language, religion and agriculture. Grade only. Offered every semester.

This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2: yes

This is a new course proposal: no

Proposal Category: Arts & Science Core: Social Science

Department Contact: Jerry Gerlach

Email: jgerlach@winona.edu

 

Approval/Disapproval Recommendations: Form attached

 

Social Science Outcomes

 

  1. Understanding humans as individuals and as part of larger social systems.
  2. The course is concerned with the study of the larger components of human cultures. The class examines how individuals, families, groups, nations, and the world as a whole exist in cultural systems. It includes the study of population, migration, folk and popular culture, language, religion, food ways and other key components of culture.

  3. Understand the historical context of social science.
  4. The historical development of the components of culture is studied. The tracing of the origin and diffusion of all of these is analyzed. They are mapped and compared.

  5. Identify problems and frame research questions relating to humans and their experience.
  6. Problems and research questions are posed noting differences and similarities of various cultures. Questions asked include those relating to the consequences of the various cultures interacting. There is a heavy emphasis on this interaction because of the nature of a "shrinking world" in economic, military, and social terms.

  7. Become familiar with the process of theory-building and theoretical frameworks used by the social sciences.

Theory building is examined by the use of models developed to measure the spread of cultural traits. This applies in language, religion, and other examples. Spatial interaction is measured. Diffusion is analyzed in hierarchical, contagious, and stimulus fashion.

 

5. Understand research methods used in the social sciences.

The methods used in the social sciences are compared. The unique spatial approach of geography is stressed. Mapping as a form of geographic representation is developed. Maps from tangible sources are used, but a key item stressed is the development of mental maps.

  1. Describe and detail discipline-specific knowledge and its applications.
  2. Key to geography study is the development of what, where, and why. What are the cultural elements studied? Where are they located? And why are they located where they are at, and what are they related to in physical and human terms.

  3. Understand differences and commonalities across humans and their experiences.

Differences and commonalities among the world’s culture groups are examined and analyzed. This stresses all people have these cultural elements, but how did they come to differ in time and place. Also analysis stresses how cultures are coming together spatially in the global village.

Syllabus

Geography 213 – Cultural Geography

University Studies Course

(Arts & Science Core: Social Science)

 

Instructor: Jerry Gerlach Email: jgerlach@winona.edu

Office: Minn´┐Ż 327 Office Phone: 457-5432 (voice mail)

Office Hours: M,W,F, 10-11:am; 1-2 pm; M 5-5:30 pm; and by appointment

 

 

Course Description

An introduction to the significance and areal distribution of various cultural elements of our environment with emphasis on population, cultural origins, language, religion, and agriculture.

 

 

Course Goals

University Studies: Social Science Outcomes

(US:SSO in Syllabus outline) are used to explain course conent, areas covered, and assessment of the student.

 

 

Course Objectives

To describe and analyze the spatial aspects of the cultural traits of the world’s people. To provide the student with the necessary background to analyze and compare these traits by areas and note the differences and commonalities they share and how they are related. Activities in class may include lecture, discussion, presentation, and in- and out-of-class papers.

 

 

University Studies: Social Science Outcomes

(US:SSO in Syllabus Outline)

 

 

  1. To understand humans as individuals and parts of larger social systems.
    1. Goal

The student will come to understand what a culture system is. The meaning of culture, culture trait, cultural hearth and cultural spread are studied and mapped. The activities include discussing and locating the component part of culture systems.

  1. To understand the historical content of the social sciences.
    1. Goal

To understand the historical development of the culture system and its spread. Students will learn of the differences in the development of systems from different cultural hearths. The activities include describing, locating, and analyzing these components.

  1. To identify with frame research questions relating to humans and their experience.
    1. Goal

To understand differences and similarities of cultures, research theories of origin, cause of origin, and interaction of varying cultures are posed. Questions to answer are related to human and environmental responses to the problems.

  1. To become familiar with the process of theory-building and theoretical frameworks used by the social sciences.
    1. Goal

The study of theory building is used to examine the origin and the spread of cultural traits. The strength of the trait’s development is compared in the place of origin and where it has spread. The spread of traits are discussed in hierarchical, contagious, and relocation theories.

  1. To understand research methods used in the social sciences.
    1. Goal

Students will become familiar with the unique geographical approach to study. They will note that maps can be used to test geographic theories of culture. Maps from tangible sources (i.e. Atlases) will be used and students will be encouraged to develop the use of mental maps or spatial thought.

 

  1. To describe and detail discipline-specific knowledge and its application.
    1. Goal

To understand the what, where, and why of the earth’s major cultural systems. They will compare culture to the earth’s various physical environments and to assess similarities and differences accordingly.

  1. To understand differences among and commonalities across humans and their experience.
    1. Goal

To understand the basic culture traits belonging to all people. The students will note how, where, and when these traits came to differ and how these similarities develop and unite the world’s cultures. Analysis also will stress how world cultures are coming together in the global village.

 

 

 

Text

The Cultural Landscape: An Introduction to Human Geography, 6th edition, by J.M. Rubenstein.

 

 

Attendance Policy

Attendance is mandatory at all classes. A student is allowed two unexcused absences. (This semester that equals one meeting). For every unexcused absence, two points will be deducted from the student’s final numerical grade. Valid excuses are those accepted by the Dean of the College. All make-up tests, if excused, will be given on last day of class.

 

 

Grading Policy

The final grade will be determined by the grades the student has earned on the exams. The exams include material covered in the lecture and the readings. Four 100-point exams will be given.

90 plus = A

80 plus = B

70 plus = C

60 plus = D

 

 

Course Outline

 

The University Studies Social Sciences are integrated into each unit studied.

 

 

    1. Introduction Ch 1
    2. US:SSO 1 through 7

    3. Population Ch 2
    4. US:SSO 1 through 7

    5. Imigration Ch 3
    6. US:SSO 1 through 7

    7. Language Ch 5
    8. US:SSO 1 through 7

    9. Religion Ch 6
    10. US:SSO 1 through 7

    11. Agriculture Ch 10
    12. US:SSO 1 through 7

    13. Social Customs Chs 4 & 7
    14. US:SSO 1 through 7

    15. Developmental & Industry Chs 9 & 11

US:SSO 1 through 7