Approved by Faculty Senate.

University Studies Course Approval

 

 

Program: Geography

Course Number: 233

Semester Hours: 3

Frequency of Offering: Every year, grade only, no prerequisite

Course Title: Geography of the Orient

Catalog Description:

A study of the physical and cultural features of the Far East. Grade only. Offered every year.

 

This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2: yes

This is a new course proposal: no

Proposed Category: Unity and Diversity: Multicultural Perspective

Departmental Contact: Jerry Gerlach, ext. 5432

Email: jgerlach@winona.edu

Approval/Disapproval Recommendation form attached.

 

University Studies Course

Unity and Diversity: Multicultural Perspectives

Geography of the Orient (Geography 233)

 

 

C. Multicultural Perspectives

1. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse cultural patterns and similarities of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures.

The Geography of the Orient is designed to give students a view of an area of the world possessing cultures different from that of Anglo-America. The course is structured to allow students to come to understand the basic differences between major Oriental cultures and Anglo-American culture as it applies to their way of life. This continues by examining how the major Oriental cultures use their environment to live.

    1. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences.
    2. The major Oriental cultural groups; Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Southeast Asian, are compared with each other and with other major world cultures in a number of ways to explain this topic. The experiences begin with an examination of the most significant Oriental culture, China, and the subsequent development of the others. The population and economic components of each culture are compared emphasizing individuality, social stratification, and the role of the sexes. How these apply to the family, the group, and the nation are noted. Economically these cultures are studied and compared in their development.

    3. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interactions between individuals and/or group.
    4. The differences between the cultures are studied and compared between the groups in the area, and especially between these groups and outside ones. The comparisons note how the Oriental cultures were forced to interact with the western cultures, especially after the west was industrialized. The relationships are examined in the social and economic framework of development, and especially as these cultures become important to the world after 1950. The unique cultural landscapes are noted.

    5. Examine different cultures through their various expressions.

These areas are studied with an emphasis on their human landscapes. Their desire to structure their rural societies around highly efficient agricultural systems that are among the most productive in the world are stressed. Each of the major cultures is noted and compared with each other and the west. The non-Christian or eastern landscapes, diets, etc. are noted. The fact that other really different cultures exist in the Orient is developed by comparison of all components of culture with North America’s culture.

 

 

Syllabus

Geography 233 – Geography of the Orient

University Studies Course

(Unity and Diversity Core – Multicultural Perspectives)

 

 

Instructor: Jerry Gerlach Email: jgerlach@winona.edu

Office: Minné 327 Office phone: 457-5432 (voice mail)

Office Hours: MWF 10-11 am, 1-2 pm; M 5:30 pm and by appointment

 

Course Description

A study of the physical and cultural features of the Far East. Grade only. Offered every other year.

Course Goals

University Studies: Unity and Diversity: Multicultural Perspectives (US: in syllabus outline) are used to explain the course content, areas covered, and assessment of the student.

Course Objectives

To describe and analyze the cultural landscape of East and Southeast Asia. This will involve an overview of the whole region followed by regional studies of the area. Activities in class may include lecture, discussion, presentations, and in- and out-of-class papers.

 

University Studies Course

Unity and Diversity: Multicultural Perspectives

(UD: in Syllabus Outline)

 

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures.
    1. Goal

    The students will understand the culture of areas different than their own. Comparisons between the major Oriental cultures and Anglo-American culture as it applied to their way of life. The comparison stresses how peoples of the Orient use their environment to live.

  2. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interpretation of events, ideas, and experiences.
    1. Goal

    Understand the major Oriental cultural groups: Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Southeast Asian, and compare them with each other and with Western cultures, especially Anglo-American in ways appropriate to explain the topic. The population and economic components of each culture are compared emphasizing individuality, social stratification, and the role of sexes. How these apply to the family, the group, and the nation are noted. Economically, these cultures are studied and compared in their development.

  3. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interactions between individuals and/or groups.
    1. Goal

    To understand the differences between the area’s culture groups, they are compared with one another and with outside groups. The comparisons stress the forced interaction of Oriental cultures with western cultures, especially after the west was industrialized. The relationships are examined in the social and economic framework of development, and especially as these cultures became important to the world after 1950. The unique cultural landscapes of the Orient are noted.

  4. Examine different cultures through various expressions.
    1. Goal

To understand the various landscapes of the Orient, they are studied and compared with an emphasis on their human components. Their highly efficient rural agricultural systems that are among the most productive in the world are studied. Each of the major cultures is studied and compared with each other and the west. The non-Christian or eastern landscapes, diets, etc., are noted. The fact that really different cultures exist in the Orient is developed by comparison of all of the components of culture with those of North America’s culture.

Text

Dragons and Tigers: A Geography of South, East and Southeast Asia by B. A. Weightman, New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2002.

 

Attendance Policy

Attendance is mandatory of all classes. A student is allowed two unexcused absences. For every unexcused absence, two points will be deducted from the student’s final numerical grade. Valid excuses are those accepted by the Dean of the College. All make-up tests, if excused, will be given on the last day of the semester.

 

Grading Policy

The final grade will be determined by the grades the student has earned on the exams. The exams include material covered in the lecture and the text.

90+ = A

80+ = B

70+ = C

    1. = D

I. Introduction

A. Oriental Patterns
UD:MP 1-4

II. Regions
A. China
UD:MP 1– 4

B. Japan
UD:MP 1-4

C. Korea
UD:MP 1-4

D. Philippines
UD:MP 1-4

E. Mainland SE Asia
1. Vietnam

    1. Thailand
    2. Malaysia
    3. Cambodia & Laos
      UD:MP 1-4

F. Indonesia
UD:MP 1-4