University Studies Course Approval

 

Department or Program                                         JPN (Global Studies)                       

 

Course Number                                                           101                                                     

 

Semester Hours                                                   4                                                         

 

Frequency of Offering                                              every year                                         

 

Course Title                                                               Beginning Japanese I                       

 

Catalog Description                                                     JPN 101 is designed to acquaint

                                                                                    students with grammatical structures

                                                                                    and vocabulary appropriate for

                                                                                    beginning learners.  Instruction

                                                                                    focuses on development of all four

                                                                                    skills (speaking, listening, reading,

                                                                                    and writing) and cultural knowledge

 

This is an existing course previously approved             Approved by A2C2 (3/10/03

By A2C2

 

This is a new course proposal                                  Yes (as of 3/10/03)

 

(If this is a new course proposal, the WSU                see attached

Curriculum Approval Form must also be

Completed as in the process prescribed by

WSU Regulation 3-4)

 

Proposal Category:                                                       Arts and Sciences Core—

                                                                                    Humanities

 

Department Contact                                                           Ruth Forsythe

 

Email Address:                                                         rforsythe@winona.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JPN 101 (Global Studies)

Beginning Japanese I

University Studies – Arts and Sciences Core: Humanities Course

 

Catalog Description                                                                                                                

JPN 101 is designed to acquaint students with grammatical structures and vocabulary appropriate for beginning learners.  Instruction focuses on development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge.

 

General Course Information                                                                                        

JPN 101 is one of the options for the Foreign Language and Cultural Immersion requirement in the Asian Studies option of the Global Studies major.  This is a course that is designed to introduce students to the study of language as an expression of cultural values and identity.  Through the study of Japanese grammatical structures and vocabulary, students will gain an understanding the relationship between culture and language.

 

This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to…

a. identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular Humanities discipline;

b. understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations; and

c. understand the role of critical analysis (e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical, rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expressions of human experience.

Rationale                                                                                                                               

USP Course Objective a)             Students learn to identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular humanities discipline:

 

The student of beginning Japanese is introduced to the fundamentals of second language learning.  They learn how to identify and use grammatical structures in order to produce syntactically correct Japanese sentences.  As with many non-western languages, the study of Japanese exposes students to the rigors of learning two scripts and kanji characters; through this exposure, students learn first-hand about differences in writing systems and the effect such systems have on expression.  In this course, student are exposed to some of the techniques for learning a second language: role playing through use of dialogues, pattern drills, methods for remembering kanji characters, use of dictionaries, and pronunciation drills.

 

USP Course Objective b)             Students learn how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations:

 

Through an introduction to Japanese, students learn about some of the major changes that have occurred in the development of Japanese in terms of spoken and written expression.  In order to use Japanese, they will have to learn about how language expression is shaped by cultural values; for example, they will learn about how the collectivistic characteristics of Japanese culture restrict the ability to express highly individualistic concepts.  Since selection of vocabulary and syntax is determined by gender, social class, and level of familiarity, students will have to become familiar with the connection between culture and language.   Through a variety of speaking, listening, writing and reading exercises, students will gain an understanding of the importance of understanding the characteristics of language in order to use that language effectively.

 

USP Course Objective c)             Students learn to understand the role of critical analysis (e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical, rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expressions of human experience.

 

An important element of learning Japanese will be the practice of translation exercises.  Students will have to use critical analysis skills in order to determine equivalent vocabulary and syntactical structures in Japanese and English.  They will come to realize the difficulties of producing exact translations and will learn to make choices based on the need to communicate effectively and in a manner that is aesthetically pleasing in Japanese.  They will come to understand that rhetorical patterns in Japanese are different from those they are familiar with in English; they will have to learn to make choices and adapt to a new set of aesthetic and rhetorical demands.

 

Beginning Japanese I (JPN 101)

Course Syllabus

 

Instructor:

            Office:                                                  Telephone:

            Email:

            Office Hours:

 

Course Materials:                                                                                                                 

        Textbook:  Eri Banno, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese Genki. Vol. I (The Japan Times, 2002)

        Workbook: Eri Banno, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese Genki. Vol. I (The Japan Times, 2002)

        Genki Websites: 

http://www.genki-online.com/

http://www.genki-online.com/kyozai/hiragana.html (hiragana)

http://www.genki-online.com/kyozai/katakana.html (katakana)

http://www.genki-online.com/kyozai/kanji by lesson.html (kanji)

        Genki CD: 

        Recommended Reference Materials:

English-Japanese/Japanese-English Learner’s Pocket Dictionary.

            (Kenkyusha, 1996)

Nakamura, Y. and Yoshida, M. Furigana Japanese-English Dictionary.

Furigana English-Japanese Dictionary.

            (Kodansha International, 1996)

 

Course Description and Objectives:                                                                            

Japanese 101 is designed to acquaint students with grammatical structures and vocabulary appropriate for beginning learners.  The first six lessons of Genki are covered.   Instruction will focus on the development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing), and cultural knowledge.   Through a variety of communicative activities, students will learn how to express their own ideas and to use the language creatively both orally and in writing.

 

This is a University Studies Course that fulfills the Arts and Sciences Core—Humanities. This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ ability to…

a. identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular Humanities discipline;

b. understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations; and

c. understand the role of critical analysis (e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical, rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expressions of human experience.

 

 

At the end of the course, the successful students will be able to do the following:

bulletRead and write hiragana, katakana, and approximately 60 kanji characters bulletUnderstand basic Japanese grammar and its function bulletGreet, introduce themselves, talk and ask about everyday activities, one’s likes and dislikes bulletPick up important information from various authentic materials

 

This class will be conducted primarily in Japanese.

 

Attendance:                                                                                                                           

 

Because of the cumulative nature of language learning, it is essential that students keep up with course work on a daily basis and attend all classes.  If you miss more than five class meetings, for each additional absence, you will lose your points towards your attendance score.  If you miss more than ten class meetings, you will automatically fail this course. 

 

If you have to miss class meetings for official class activities, medical or other legitimate reasons, please contact the instructor in advance, and turn in an official letter that verifies the reason for the absence.

 

Grading Policy:                                                                                                             

 

Attendance and Class Participation                  15%

Lab Attendance                                              5%

Homework Assignments                              15%

Project and Oral Test                                               10%

Quizzes                                                             20%

Chapter Tests                                                   20%

Final Exam                                                        15%

 

90-100% = A   80-89% = B             70-79% = C             60-69% = D

 

Language Lab:  Students are to practice Japanese with tapes in the Language Lab, including listening to comprehension assignments in the textbook and workbook.   Although one per week is required, students are encouraged to use the lab more frequently.

 

Drill Sessions:  Drill sessions are part of the course.  Materials in the textbook will be covered in the drill sessions.  Students are not allowed to speak English during the drill sessions and attendance is required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

PROPOSAL FOR NEW COURSES

 

Department: Global Studies                                                 Date: Feb. 26, 2003             

 

Course No. JPN 101                      Course Name: Beginning Japanese I                     Credits   4      

 

This proposal is for a(n):         X    Undergraduate course  _____   Graduate Course

 

Applies to:   X    Major                     ____  Minor                  X    University Studies Course      

___    Required                         ____  Required                       

                                  X    Elective                ____  Elective 

 

Prerequisite:  None

 

Grading:            X_  Grade only             ____  P/NC only             ____ Grade and P/NC Option

 

Frequency of offering: Once a year

 

Please provide the following information:

 

A.  Course Description

            Attached

 

B. Rationale

            Attached

 

C.  Impact of this course on other Departments, Programs, Majors, or Minors

            Attached

 

D.  University Studies Course Proposals

Upon approval as a new course, this course will be proposed for University Studies approval.

 

Financial and Staffing Data Sheet:

            Attached

 

Approval Form

            Attached

 

Department Contact Person for this Proposal:

 

  Name Ruth Forsythe                       Phone  457-5429             E-mail  rforsythe@winona.edu

 

 

 

 

A.  Course Description:

 

    1. Proposed Catalog Description:  JPN 101 is designed to acquaint students with grammatical structures and vocabulary appropriate for beginning learners.  Instruction focuses on development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge. 

 

    1. Course outline of the major topics and subtopics:

 

I. Topic: New Friends

            A.  Basic Declarative Sentence Structure

B. Question Sentences

C.  Possessive

D.  Time/ Age

 

II. Topic:  Shopping:

A. This/That/Which/Whose

                                          B. Conjunction (mo)

C  Basic Negative Sentence Structure

D. Location:  In the classroom

 

                          III. Topic:  Making a Date

A.     Verb Conjugation

B.     Verb Types and the “Present Tense”

C.     Particles

D.     Time Reference

E.      Word Order

F.      Frequency Adverbs

G.     Topic Particle (wa)

 

                          IV. Topic: The First Date

 

          A. X ga arimasen / imasen

                 B. Describing Where Things Are

                              C. Past Tense

                D. Takusan

        E.  Particles: (to / mo)

        F.  Locations

        G.  Days/Weeks/Months/Years

 

V.  Topic:  A Trip to Okinawa

A. Adjectives

                  B.  Degree Expressions

            C.  Counting

            D.  At the Post Office

            E.  At a Photo Shop

      VI. Topic: A Day in Robert’s Life

            A. –te form

            B.  Describing Two Activities

            C.  Directions

 

3. Basic instructional plan and methods:  Lectures, recitation sessions (grammar/dialogue patterns), oral exercises (CD/tapes), workbook exercises, writing assignments.

 

4. Course requirements: Students will be evaluated on the basis of their performance on the following: Class activities--exercises, conversation dialogues, and recitation sessions; homework assignments; vocabulary and writing (kana/kanji) quizzes; exams (listening, speaking, reading and writing); final oral project 

 

5. Course materials:

 

Textbook:

Eri Banno, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese Genki. Vol. I. (The Japan Times, 2002)

                       

Workbook:

Eri Banno, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese Genki. Workbook I. (The Japan Times, 2002)

                       

                        Genki Websites:

                                    http://www.genki-online.com/

                                    http://www.genki-online.com/kyozai/hiragana.html (hiragana)

                                    http://www.genki-online.com/kyozai/katakana.html (katakana)

                                    http://www.genki-online.com/kyozai/kanji_by_lesson.html (kanji)

 

Genki CD:  

The CD contains dialogues, vocabulary (in Japanese and English), practice exercises—all found in the Dialogue and Grammar section of the textbook, as well as the conversations used for listening practice in the Workbook

 

                        Recommended Reference Materials:

                                    English-Japanese/Japanese-English Learner’s Pocket Dictionary.

                                    (Kenkyusha, 1996)

Nakamura, Y. and Yoshida, M. Furigana Japanese-English Dictionary.  (Kodansha International, 1996)

Nakamura, Y. and Yoshida, M. Furigana English-Japanese Dictionary.  (Kodansha International, 1996)

 

6. List of References:

 

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Provisional Proficiency Guidelines.  New York: ACTFL, 1982.

 

Brewster, E. Thomas and Elizabeth S. Brewster.  Language Acquisition Made Practical.  Pasadena, CA: Lingua House, 1976.

 

Byrnes, Heidi and Michael Canale, Eds.  Defining and Developing Proficiency: Guidelines, Implementations, and Concepts.  Lincolnwood, IL: National Textbook Company, 1987.

 

Engelberg, Gary.  An Expanded Collect ion of Language Informant Techniques.  Washington, DC: United States Peace Corps, 1976.

 

Freeman, G. Ronald.  101+ Ways to Stimulate Conversation in a Foreign Language.  New York: ACTFL Materials Center.

 

Hadmitzky, Wolfgang and Mark Spahn.  Kanji and Kana: A Handbook and Dictionary of the Japanese Writing System.  Tokyo: Charles E. Tuttle Co., 1989.

 

Hiroo Japanese Center. The Complete Japanese Verb Guide.  Tokyo: Charles E. Tuttle Co., 1990.

 

James, Charles J., Ed.  Foreign Language Proficiency in the Classroom and Beyond.  Lincolnwood, IL:  National Textbook Company, 1985.

 

Johnson, Dora E., et al.  A Survey of Materials for the Study of the Uncommonly Taught Languages.  Orlando, FL: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich International, 2000.

 

            Kindaichi, Haruhiko. The Japanese Language. Tokyo: Charles E.            

            Tuttle  Co., 1989.

 

            Marshall, Terry.  The Whole World Guide To Language Learning. 

            Yarmouth, Maine: Intercultural Press, 1989.

 

Mizutani, Osamu and Nobuko Mizutani.  How To Be Polite in Japanese.  Tokyo:  The Japan Times, 1989.

 

National Audiovisual Center.  A List of Audiovisual Materials Produced by the United State Government for Foreign Language Instruction.  Washington, DC: National Audiovisual Center.

 

            O’Neill, P.G. and S. Yanada.  An Introduction to Written Japanese.              Tokyo: Charles E. Tuttle, Co., 1988.

 

----.   Japanese Names: A Comprehensive Index by Characters and Readings.  New York: Weatherhill, Inc., 1989.

 

Stevick, Earl W.  Teaching Languages: A Way and Ways.  Rowley, MA: Newbury House Publishers, Inc., 1998.

 

            B. Rationale

     

            1. Statement of major focus and objectives of course:

 

            Focus:

                       

            This course is designed to acquaint students with grammatical

Structures and vocabulary appropriate for the first level of beginning learners.  The first six lessons of Genki Vol. I are covered in this course.  Basic grammar will be introduced through the course, and drill and practice on oral language using the new grammar will be conducted in class and outside of class.  Through a variety of communicative activities, students will learn how to express their own ideas and to use the language creatively both orally and in writing.  Instruction is designed to strengthen students’ skill in all four areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing.   

 

Objectives: By the end of the semester, students should acquire

 the following language skills:

        Ability to read and write hiragana, katakana, and approximately 60 kanji

        Ability to understand basic Japanese grammar and its function

        Ability to greet, introduce themselves, talk and ask about everyday activities, one’s likes and dislikes

        Ability to pick up important information from various authentic materials

 

2. Contribution of Course to Program Curriculum:  This course is intended to be a part of the Asian Studies component of the proposed new Global Studies major.  This course is one of the options for the Foreign Language requirement in the Asian Studies option (Regional Perspectives).

     

3.  Impact on Other Program Offerings:  This is a new course for a new program, so no course will be dropped to teach it.

 

C.  Impact of Course on other Departments, Programs, Majors, or Minors

 

1.  Clearly state the impact of this course on courses taught in other departments:

 

There are no other non-western languages taught at WSU, so there is no duplication of material taught in this course.  This course provides another foreign language option for students and provides an important foundation and requirement for the Asian Studies option in the new Global Studies major.

                       

2.  Does this course increase or decrease the total credits required by a major or minor of any other department? If so, which department(s)?

 

This course neither increases nor decreases the total number of credits required by a major, minor or department; this course has no impact on other departments or their offerings.

  

3. List the departments, if any, which have been consulted about this proposal.

 

No departments have assisted directly in designing this course, but the Global Studies Council members include representatives from several different departments; the Foreign Language department is aware of this proposal.