Approved by Faculty Senate

 

Winona State University
College of Nursing & Health Sciences
Department of Health & Human Performance

Course Syllabus - HHP 445
Medical Aspects of Exercise (3 S.H.)
Spring 2001

 

Professor: Dr. Phil Appicelli

Office: Memorial Hall 130

Email: pappicelli @winona.edu

Office hours: TR, 9:30-1& 12:30 - 2pm; MWF, 9-10 (or by appointment)

Phone: 457-5388

Room: Phelps~B7

Web page: httn://coursel .winona.rnsus.edu/napnicelli

Textbooks:

McArdle, W.D., Katch, F.I., and Katch, V.L. (1996).

Exercise Physiology: Energy Nutrition and Human

Performance, 4th Edition. Williams & Wilkins:

Philadelphia., or other exs phys text.

Skinner, J.S. (1993). Exercise Testing and Exercise

Prescription for Special Cases, 2nd Edition. Lea & Febiger:

Philadelphia.

Catalog description

Selected topics regarding the science and medicine of sports and exercise participation. Areas to be covered include pharmacologic aspects, overtraining and overreaching, the effect of exercise on reproductive function, and exercise for special populations

University Studies Writing Rag:

This class satisfies the University Studies requirements for a writing flag. The purpose of the writing flag is to reinforce the outcomes specified for the basic skills area of writing. Therefore, this course is intended to provide contexts, opportunities, and feedback for students writing with discipline-specific texts, tools, and strategies.

This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to:

a. Promotes the students' ability to practice the processes 3and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields.

b. Promote the students' ability to understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields.

c. Promote the students' ability to adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields.

d. Promote the students' ability to make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields

e. Promote the students' ability to learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their field.

These requirements are met primarily through your term project and are specifically identified on the syllabus with the appropriate letter reference where the specific objectives are met.

Objectives:

1. Describe the endocrine response and adaptation to exercise and exercise training.

2. Following lecture and textbook readings, students will value physical activity as preventive medicine for obesity, diabetes, and aging effects.

3. Demonstrate an understanding of physiological responses/adaptations and exercise prescription for low back pain patients.

4. Identify ergogenic aids to physical performance, and their efficacy.

5. Demonstrate an understanding of the environmental effects on exercise

6. Demonstrate an understanding of physiological responses/adaptations and exercise prescription for the asthmatic patient.

7 Describe age-related changes in physiologic systems to exercise and exercise training.

8 Understand the relationship between physical activity, and longevity, obesity, and coronary artery disease.

9 Discuss clinical exercise physiology principles used in the rehabilitation of the pulmonary, rheumatoid arthritis, low back pain, asthmatic, renal failure, diabetic, cystic fibrotic, and child patient.

10. Demonstrate an understanding of the exercise guidelines used for pregnant females.

11. Discuss Selye's stress adaptation model, and relate the model to overtraining in athletes.

12. 1C3 - Intrinsic risk factors associated with normal physical and psychological growth and development patterns of the pre-adolescent, adolescent, and adult male and female athlete.

13. 1C4 - Risk factors associated with congenital or acquired postural abnormalities, physical disabilities, and diseases (i.e. epilepsy, diabetes, asthma, congenital heart disease, absence of paired organs, visual impairments, etc.)

14. 1C6 - Sports specific environmental risk factors associated with climatic conditions, facilities and equipment, sanitation, etc, and associated risk management procedures/safety guidelines.

15 IC18-~Principles of an effective heat illness prevention program including those pertaining to acclimatization and conditioning, fluid and electrolyte replacement, selection of clothing, monitoring of weight loss, and scheduling and organization of practice sessions.

16. 1C19 -.Normal thermoregulatory mechanisms of the human body including methods of heat dissipation and the associated effects of exposure to high environmental heat and humidity.

17 1C23 - Comparative qualities of various types of protective sports equipment, clothing, and commercial padding materials with regard to their affect on body heat dissipation.

18. 11C3 - Anatomical and physiological growth and development characteristics as related to the pre-adolescent, adolescent, and adult male and female athlete.

19 VIC1 - Role of coaches and athletes in reducing injury/illness risks including those related to physical conditioning, acclimatization, fluid and electrolyte replacement, care and maintenance of protective equipment, organization of practice sessions, coaching methods, etc.

20. VIC2 - Physiological effects of physical activity on menstruation (oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea) and associated psychological considerations.

21. VICS - Symptoms and clinical signs of common eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, etc.).

22. VIC6 Principles of weight control including methods of determining body fat percentage and caloric requirements and the effect of exercise and fluid loss.

23 VIC7 - Physiological processed and time factors involved in the digestion, absorption, and assimilation of various foodstuffs as related to the design and planning of pre-game/event tension and anxiety.

24 VICS - The physiological effects, comparative benefits, and contraindications to the use of ergogenic aids (drugs, foodstuffs, physical agents, etc.).

25. 1C9 - The effects of commonly abused drugs and other substances on the athlete's physical and psychological health and athletic performance (alcohol, tobacco, stimulants, steroids, narcotics, etc.)

26. VIC2O - Basic principles of learning and motivation and methods of classroom instruction including instructional techniques, use of audiovisual aids, test construction, and evaluation of student competencies (including tasks within the six d6mains of the NATA Role Delineation Study).

Attendance policy:

Class attendance is required, unexcused absences will result in a 2 point deduction/absence.

Academic misconduct:

Anyone caught cheating, collaborating with others (when

not instructed to do so), plagiarizing work, presenting work previously presented to another class, or any other inappropriate conduct will be charged with academic misconduct and could receive and F in the course and/or be expelled from the University.

Prerequisites

Students taking this class are expected to have passed

Exercise Physiology (HHP 340), Pathophysiology (NURS

366) and therefore also Anatomy and Physiology (Rio 211

and 212).

Grading policy.

You will complete three written examinations on the dates listed. No makeup examinations will be given! Each examination will be worth 100 points. The format of examinations will be multiple-choice, true/false and short answer, drawn from the reading and lecture materials. The research paper assignment is worth 100 points. The in class presentation based on the students research topic is worth 50 points

Points

Exam I 100

Exam II 100

Final Exam 100 (not comprehensive)

Research Paper 100

Class Presentation 50

Total 450

Grading Scale


100-90% A

89-80% B

79-70% C

69-60% D

<60% F

Late work:

Late work will not be accepted unless extreme circumstance (with documentation) and notification is given in advance

Topics to be covered:

Topic Chapter

Endocrine system and response to exercise 20 M

Ergogenic aids 23 M

Environmental stress 24-25 M, 6 5

Aging and exercise 30M, 5S
Obesity 29M, 11S

Rheumatoid Arthritis 7S

Osteoporosis 8S

Low Back Pain 9S

 

Diabetes 10 S

Asthma 12 S

Children 4 S

Cystic Fibrosis 14 S

Pregnancy 21 S

Female and the athletic triad

 

End-stage disease 20 S

Stress and overtraining

 

M = McArdle, Katch, and Katch, 1996; S = Skinner, 1993

Dates you need to know!!

Choice of Research topic with topic statement and questions, due Feb 5 a,d

Exam I Feb 12

Outline of research paper with revised topic statement, due

Mar2 a,b,c,d,e

Exam ll Mar23

Research paper due April 13 a,b,c,d,e

Student presentations Begin April 16?

Final (Exam Ill) May 3 @ 8 am

Rationale for HHP 445 as a University Studies Writing Flag

This course requires a writing intensive term project where students complete an in-depth review of a sports medicine topic of their choice. This project is accomplished in several steps. First, students are shown how to locate scientific research articles using the Internet and content specific indexes. Based on their interest and the preliminary information they find, students are required to hand in a topic statement and list of questions that they plan to address in their term paper. These assignments are evaluated for content and scope and returned to the students. Next, students refine their topic statement and list of questions and proceed to develop an outline that will serve as the framework for their final paper. After the revised topic statement and outline are evaluated, the student completes a draft that will be blindly evaluated by a fellow student. The student then completes their final draft of the paper with appropriate scientific format and APA referencing style. This writing project accounts for approximately 22% of their final grade in the class.

 

The Writing Flag Criteria are met as follows:

a. Promotes the Students' ability to practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields. Sports Medicine professionals are required to stay current in the many discipline areas. This requires an ability to find current research, synthesize and integrate the information, and often present a report in written format to other professionals The work the students do in this class helps them develop the skills to become more proficient at this entire process.

b. Promote the students' ability to understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields. Students gain an understanding of appropriate writing from reading and reviewing the scientific articles they locate and from the specific assignment instructions. Students then have the opportunity to apply their understanding of appropriate writing by completing their paper.

c. Promote the students' ability to adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields. Making use of original scientific research to prepare a report with appropriate documentation and referencing is the common format expected by exercise scientists. Therefore this class project requires them to learn and become more proficient at this process.

d. Promote the students' ability to make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in t heir fields During the process of completing this class, students are introduced to the Internet and computer databases for locating scientific research articles. Students also 'take use of word processing software, PowerPoint, and potentially graphic software.

e. Promote the students' ability to learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their field. The students' final draft of their review paper requires them to support their: statements with data from peer reviewed scientific journals. The paper is also required t6 be completed with appropriate APA format and referencing.