Approved by University Studies Sub-Committee.  A2C2 action pending.

 

HHP 430: Public Health

 

Department of Health & Human Performance

Winona State University

Tuesday & Thursdays 8:00-9:20a.m.

Fall 2001

 

Instructor Connie Mettille

Office 132 Memorial Hall, # 457-5456

E-mail cmettille@winona.mnus.edu

Office Hours MTWR 10:00-12:00

Course applies to: Required course for all students majoring in the School and Community Health options; non-teaching, teaching, public administration. (4 S.H.)

This course is a University Studies Course satisfying the "Writing Flag" requirement.

Such courses are required to meet the following outcomes:

    1. Practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their field.
    2. Understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields.
    3. Adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their field.
    4. Make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields.
    5. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

These numbers are used in the course schedule, course objectives, and throughout the syllabus to indicate places in the class where these outcomes are met.

Course Description: Explores the foundations of public health practices, including health organization/ agency structures, and specific public health concerns of target populations. The course will have a lab component similar to a practicum: working with a public health-related organization throughout the semester, 2 hours per week minimum. Topics covered in this course could be environment health, community crisis health, and /or public service health. Prerequisites: HHP 204, 288, 410. Recommended prerequisites: HHP 403, STAT 110.

Offered yearly. Grade only.

Text Green, L.W., & Ottoson, J.M. (1999). Community and Population Health (8th ed.), Boston: WCB/McGraw-Hill

Major Focus of Course

MN Standards of effective practice for beginning teachers addressed in this course:

  1. Standard I- Subject Matter: The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for the students.
  2. A1. Understands major concepts

    A2. Knowledge influences learning

    A3. Relates disciplinary knowledge

    A4. Knowledge is ever evolving

    A5. Multiple perspectives

    A6. Uses differing viewpoints, theories

    A7. Evaluate resources for subject matter

    A8. Testing hypotheses

    A9. Promotes questioning

  3. Standard 2- Student Learning: The teacher understands how students learn and develop, and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social and personal development.
  4. B1. How learning occurs

    B2. Understand the five domains

    B7. Tie in students thinking and experiences a as resource

  5. Standard 3- Diverse Learners: The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to learners from divers cultural background and with exceptionalities.
  6. C1. Different learning approaches

    C4. Recognize dehumanization biases, discrimination & Prejudices

    C5. Learn by experience

    C6. Understand culture and community

    C9. High levels of learning expected

    C10. Sensitive to community and culture

    C11. Special provision

    C12. Teaching styles to learner

    C13. Develop Individual Instructional Programs (I1P)

    C14. Access outside services

    C15. Understands students families

    C16. Provide multiple perspectives

    C17. Create learning community

  7. Standard 4- Instructional Strategies: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving and performance skills.

D2. Cognitive processes with learning

D4. Learns through educational technology

D6. Flexibility and reciprocity

D7. Evaluated goals

D8. Use multiple strategies

D12. Teaches educational technology

E. Standard 5- Learning Environment: The teacher uses and understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning and self-motivation.

E1. Motivates Students

E2. Social economic status influences people

E3. Create learning environments to promote self-esteem

E4. Help people within society

E12. Students assume responsibility

E13. Uses individual and group learning

E14. Organization skills

E15. Time management skills

E16. Share values and expectations

E17. Analyze class and adjust

E18. Promotes individual learning

  1. Standard 6- Communication: The teacher uses knowledge of effective verbal, non-verbal and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.
  2. F1. Understands communication

    F2. Understands culture and gender

    F3. Different communication styles

    F4. Effective communication techniques

    F6. Listening skills

    F8. Models effective communication

    F9. Expands students expressions

    F10. Good questions and discussions

    F11. Uses variety of media

  3. Standard 7- Planning Instruction: The teacher plans and manages instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community and curriculum goals.
  4. G4. Long and short term plans

    G5. Uses variations in styles

    G6. Lessons at various levels

    G7. Creates learning to the curriculum

    G8. Creates short and long-term plans

  5. Standard 8- Assessment: The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the learner.
  6. H2. Understands different methods

    H5. Selection, construction and use

    H9. Uses self-assessments

    H11. Monitors self-success

  7. Standard 9- Reflection and Professional Development: The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of her/his choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning communities) and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
  8. I3. Teacher behavior influences student growth

    I4. Research on teaching

    I5. Give and receive help

    I6. Values thinking and self-evaluation

    I7. Professional responsibility

    I8. Uses all ways to evaluate

    I9. Uses professional literature and colleagues

    I10. Uses other forms for evaluation

  9. Standard 10- Collaboration, Ethics and Relationships: The teacher communicates and interacts with parents/ guardians, families, school colleagues and the community to support students’ learning and well being.

J1. Understands schools

J2. Environment in and out

J11. Use community resources

American Association of Health Education (AAHE) and the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing Standards- Responsibilities for Entry Level Health Educators addressed in this course:

  1. Assessing individual and community needs for health education
  1. Acting as a resource person in health education
  2. Communicating health and health education needs, concerns and resources
  3. Course Objectives: At the completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Develop an understanding of modern concepts of health, disease, aging, and longevity. (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, A9, B7, C1, C4, C5, C6, C9, C10, C11, C12, C14, C16, C17, D2, D4, D7, D8, D12, E2, E3, E4, E12, E13, E14, E15, E16, E17, E18, F1, F2, F3, F4, F6, F7, F8, J2, AAHE, 1, 6,7) (1,2)
    2. Develop a comprehension of major objectives; scope, functions and activities involved in public/community health movements. (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, A9, B7, C1, C4, C5, C6, C9, C10, C11, C12, C14, C16, C17, D2, D4, D7, D8, D12, E2, E3, E4, E12, E13, E14, E15, E16, E17, E18, F1, F2, F3, F4, F6, F7, F8, G4, G5, G7, G8, I5, I6, I9, I10, J2, J11, AAHE 1,6,7) (1,2,3)
    3. Develop an understanding of changing concepts in human ecology and epidemiology as related to public health and preventive medicine. (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, A9, B7, C1, C4, C5, C6, C9, C10, C11, C12, C14, C16, C17, D2, D4, D8, D12, E2, D3, D4, D12, E13, E14, E15, E16, E17, E18, F1, F2, F3, F4, F6, F7, F8, G4, G5, G7, G8, I5, I6, I9, I10, J2, J11, AAHE< 1, 6, 7) (1,2,4)
    4. Learn basic public health principles and the applications of theses to public/community health practices. (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, A9, B7, C1, C4, C5, C6, C9, C10, C11, C12, C14, C17, D2, D4, D7, D8, D12, E2, E3, E4, E12, E13, E14, E15, E16, E17, E18, F1, F2, F3, F4, F6, F7, F8, G4 G5, G7, G8, I5, I6, I9, I10, J2, J11, AAHE 1,6,7) (1,3)
    5. Become familiar with current public health issues and public health problems at the local, state, national and international level. (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A6, A7, A8, A9, B7, C1, C4, C5, C6, C9, C10, C11, C12, C14, C16, C17, D2, D4, D7, D8, D12, E2, E3, E4, E12, E13, E14, E15, E16, E17, E18, F1, F2, F3, F4, F6, F7, F8, G4, G5, G7, G8, I5, I6, I9, I10, J2, J11, AHHE I, 6,7) (1,3,4)
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of the highlights of public health history. (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, A9, B7, C1, C4, C5, C6, C9, C10, C11, C12, C14, C16, C17, D2, D4, D8, D12, E2, E3, E4, E12, E13, E14, E15, E16, E17, E18, F1, F2, F3, F4, F6, F7, F8, G4, G5, G7, G8, I5, I6, I9, I10, J2, J11, AAHE 1,6,11) (1,2)
    7. Demonstrate skills of interaction within an established public/community health agency. (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, Aaaa9, B7, C1, C4, C5, C6, C9, C10, C11, C12, C14, C17, D2, D4, D8, D12, E2, E3, E4, E12, E13, E14, E15, E16, E17, E18, F1, F2, F3, F4, F6, F7, F8, G4, G5, G7, G8, I5, I6, I9, I10, J2, J11, AAHE 1,6,7) (1,2,3,4,5)

 

 

Course Requirements:

Timely Topics: (1,2,3,5)

Students will be responsible for bringing a health-related current event to the attention of his/her peers. Topics should be selected from a newspaper article published within two weeks of the presentation. The article should be of adequate length to facilitate an interesting 5-minute discussion. Students must have a visual aid (outline) for their presentation. The students presenting must:

    1. Provide the class with a complete reference of the article
    2. Provide the class with a summary of the contents of the article
    3. Provide a brief critique describing your personal reactions and feelings
    4. Explain how the article is related to health or health education.
    5. Prepare at least two discussion questions related to the article
    6. Submit to the instructor a copy of the article and the outline

Exams: (1,2,3)

There will be four exams, non-cumulative, 50 points each. They will cover assigned chapters, class discussions, handout materials, presentations, and all information covered in class. Lectures will include material not presented in you text. The exams will consist of roughly equal proportions of questions from the reading and from the lectures.

Environmental Research Paper & Presentation: (1,2,3,4,5)

A 8-10 page research paper will be required on an environmental public health issue. The topic must be approved by the instructor and the student should review the test and other resources for ideas that may be expanded upon or researched in greater depth. A topic must be selected and approved by October 2. All work must be typed, APA format, laser printed. Near the end of the semester each student will give a 10-15 minute presentation on his or her topic, followed by a question and answer period.

Lab: (1,2,3,4,5)

Each student will select a public health/community health agency to become involved with public health service. As stated in the course description, you will be required to work cooperatively with the personnel of your agency for a total of 30 hours. Students should develop and/or work on a project with the agency. This assignment must be pre-approved by the instructor, and is worth 50 points total.

Attendance: To receive optimal benefit for you time and money involved in the class it is important that you attend. Class participation and discussion are expected. No penalty will be assessed for the first 3 absences, excused or unexcused. However, beginning with the next absence, 5 points per absence will be deducted from your total points. It is also important that each person be on time. It is distracting and inconsiderate to every class member and the instructor for individuals to arrive late to class.

 

 

 

 

 

Grading System

Exams (total) 200 points (1,2,3)

Timely Topic 10 points (1,2,3,5)

Research Paper 90 points (1,2,3,4,5)

Presentation 50 points (1,2,3,4,5)

Lab 50 points (1,2,3,4,5)

400 points

 

A= 90-100% 400-360 pts

B= 80-89% 359-320 pts

C= 7-79% 319-280 pts

D= 60-69% 279-240 pts

F= below 60% below 239

 

 

 

HP 430: Public Health

Tentative Schedule for semester

 

T 8-23: Introduction

R 8-30: Community Service Speakers

T 9-4: Community Service Speakers

R 9-6: Community Service Speakers

T 9-11: Chapter 1

R 9-13: Chapter 2 & 3

T 9-18: Chapter 4 * Community Service Contract Due

R 9-20: EXAM

T 9-25: Chapter 5

R 9-27: Chapter 6

T 10-2: Chapter 7 * Environmental Topic Due

R 10-4: Chapter 8

T 10-9: EXAM

R 10-11: Chapter 9

T 10-16: Chapter 10

R 10-18: Chapter 11

T 10-23: Chapter 12

R 10-25: EXAM

T 10-30: Environmental Presentations **All papers due

R 11-1: Environmental Presentations

T 11-6: Environmental Presentations

R 11-8: Environmental Presentations

T 11-13: Environmental Presentations

R 11-15: Environmental Presentations

T 11-20: Environmental Presentations

R 11-22: NO CLASSES

T 11-27: Chapter 18 & 19

R 11-29: Chapter 20 & 21

T 12-4: Community Service Reports *Labs Due

R 12-6: Community Service Reports

Wednesday 12-12: 3:30-5:30pm FINAL EXAM

 

 

 

 

 

 

University Studies Course Approval

 

 

Department or Program: Health & Human Performance

Course Number/Title: HHP 430: Public Health

Number of Credits: 4 semester credits

Frequency of Offering: Fall Semester Only

Catalog Description: Explores the foundations of public health practices, including health organization/agency structures, and specific public health concerns of the target populations. The course will have a component similar to a practicum – working 2 hours per week minimum. Topics covered in this course could be environmental health, community crisis health and/or public service health. Prerequisites: HHP 204, 288 311, and 328. Non teaching majors: prerequisites: HHP 403 and STAT 110. Offered yearly. Grade only.

This is an existing course previously Yes

Approved by A2C2:

This is a new course proposal: No

University Studies Approval is requested in: Flagged Course: Writing Flag

Department Contact: Dr. Gail A. Grimm,

Connie Mettille

Email Address: ggrimm@winona.edu

cmettille@winona.edu

 

The purpose of the Writing Flag requirement is to reinforce the outcomes, specified for the basic skills area of writing. These courses are intended to provide contexts, opportunities, and feedback for students writing with discipline-specific texts, tools, and strategies. These courses should emphasize writing as essential to academic learning and intellectual development.

Courses can merit the Writing Flag by demonstrating that section enrollment will allow for clear guidance, criteria, and feedback for the writing assignments; that the course will require a significant amount of writing to be distributed throughout the semester; that writing will comprise a major portion of the students’ final course grade; and that students will have opportunities to incorporate readers’ critiques of their writing.

Below each of the four outcomes listed under the Critical Analysis requirement are listed in the course requirements, content, learning activities, and documentation relevant to the outcomes that promote the student’s ability to:

  1. practice to processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their field.
  2. This course focuses on the skills and concepts needed to be effective in the public health domain. Writing skills are demonstrated through timely topic reports, the development of an environmental research paper, an environmental research presentations (power point), and a lab experience which includes implementation of a program into the community with formal assessment/evaluation in written form.

  3. understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields.
  4. Students need to be exposed to an understand the different types of formats used within the health education/health promotion fields in order to gain support/approval for programs that need funding or administered within the community. Students need to effectively communicate through writing to various levels of administration, target populations, and personnel.

  5. adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their field.
  6. Community educations requires working within a variety of settings. This course contains a lab portions which affords students the experience of developing and implementing community programs geared toward specific populations. Students learn that written skill need to be directed to many different populations.

  7. make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their field.
  8. This course provides the student the opportunity to learn to utilize, interpret, and perform written analysis of professional journals, internet resources, and county, state, and federal statistics. Through the development of an environmental research paper/presentation and a lab experience students develop written solutions/programs to current issues within health education/health promotion.

     

     

     

  9. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

Throughout the course all materials used in preparation for programs is documented appropriately. Students come in contact with various formats, evidence of usage and documentations used within the field of health.