Approved by University Studies Sub-Committee. A2C2 action pending.

 

University Studies Course Approval

 

 

 

Department of Program:

Health & Human Performance

Course Number/Title:

HHP 491: Therapeutic Treatment and Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries

Number of Credits:

3

Frequency of Offering:

Fall Semester Only

Catalog Description:

In-depth view of pain theories, their control, and the body’s psychological and physiological responses. Indications and applications of therapeutic modalities and rehabilitation exercises will be investigated and developed into comprehensive rehabilitation programs. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: HHP 340, HHP 370, HHP 392 and HHP 393. Offered yearly. Grade Only

This is an existing course previously Approved by A2C2

Yes

This is a new course proposal:

No

University Studies Approval is requested in:

Unity and Diversity: Critical Analysis

Department Contact:

Brian Zeller

Email Address:

bzeller@winona.edu

 

 

Below each of the four outcomes listed under the Critical Analysis requirement are listed in the course requirements, content, learning activities, and documentation relevant to the outcomes that promote the student’s ability to:

    1. Evaluate the validity and reliability of information.
    2. During this course students will research, read, critically evaluate and discuss principles in the rehabilitation of athletic injuries. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of tissues and their responses to physical agents and external forces will allow the student to critically analyze when selected rehabilitative methods are valid and reliable in the treatment of athletic injuries.

    3. Analyze modes of thought, expressive works, arguments, explanation or theories.
    4. Through each section of this course students are asked to develop and implement and rehabilitative protocol for multiple different joints and injuries. Students must be able to logically and thoughtfully design a program for a student-athlete that represents the stage of healing the person is currently in, the type of injury/surgery that has occurred and the mental status of that athlete. The use of both short term and long term goals will be stated and supported for each protocol. Theories are made and defended based on current scientific findings and rationale.

    5. Recognize possible inadequacies or biases in the evidence given to support arguments or conclusions.
    6. Students will discuss and evaluate current research in the rehabilitation of athletic injuries to determine if the information is valid/reliable and appropriate for the proper treatment of an injured athlete. The student will also look at non-researched modes of rehabilitation that are in practice, critically evaluate them based on scientific bases of theories, legal & moral uses, and decide if they have a foundation for further study or a valid use. The ability to evaluate, analyze, and critically choose appropriate methods is the expected outcome.

    7. Advance and support claims.

Throughout this course and specifically in the case study requirement, students will be able to analyze results and the obtainers of goals through the implementation of an actual protocol to injured athletic (under the supervision of a staff certified athletic trainer). This allows the student to critically evaluate on a daily basis the current stage of healing the athlete is in. The appropriateness and effectiveness of the rehabilitative exercises and the achievement of documented short and long term goals.

 

Winona State University

 

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Department of Health and Human Performance

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HHP 491- Therapeutic Treatment and Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries

Fall 2001

 

Instructor- Laura P. Ziegler MS, PT, ATC

Office- 307 Maxwell Hall

Phone Number- 457-5207

Email- lziegler@winona.edu

Office Hours- MON & Thu 9-10:30 am, or by appointment

This course is a University Studies Course satisfying the "Critical Analysis" requirement in the Unity and Diversity category. Such courses are required to meet the following outcomes:

    1. Evaluate the validity and reliability of information
    2. Analyze modes of thought, expressive works, arguments, explanations, or theories
    3. Recognize possible inadequacies or biases in the evidence given to support arguments or conclusions
    4. Advance and support claims

These numbers are used in the course schedule and course requirements to indicate places in the class where these outcomes are met.

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Course Description-

In-depth view of pain theories, their control, and the body’s psychological and physiological responses. Indications and applications of therapeutic modalities and rehabilitation exercises will be investigated and developed into comprehensive rehabilitation programs. Lecturer and lab experience.

Three Semester Hours

Prerequisites- HHP 340, HHP 370, HHP 392, and HHP 393

 

 

Meets:

MWF 11:00am - 11:50am 140 Memorial Hall

Thursday 11:00am - 12:20pm 140 Memorial Hall

Text: Houglum, PA. Therapeutic Exercise for Athletic Injuries Human Kinetics Publishers, Champaign, IL 2001

________________________________________________________________________

If you have any documented disabilities and wish to discuss academic accommodations, please contact me as soon as possible or contact the Disability Resource Center- 136 Howell Hall at 457-2391.

________________________________________________________________________

 

Course Outline for the Rehabilitation of Individual Body Parts and Joints:

I. Healing Process (1, 2, 3, 4)

A. Pathophysiology

  1. Injury Management
  2. Pain

II. Rehabilitation Goals (1, 2, 3, 4)

A. Definition

B. Implementation

C. Documentation of Rehab

1. Of Process

    1. Of Function
    2. Goal Writing and Adjusting

III. Principles of Therapeutic Exercise (1, 2, 3, 4)

A. Strength

1. Isotonic

2. Isometric

3. Isokinetic

B. Flexibility

1. Static

2. Dynamic

3. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF)

C. Plyometrics

1. Principles

2. Program development and design

3. Integration in comprehensive program

D. Closed Kinetic Chain Exercise (CKC)

1. Concepts and objectives

2. Biomechanics

3. Implementation

E. Proprioception

1. Physiology

2. Progressions

F. Functional Activities

1. Role and benefits

2. Components

3. Implementation

IV. Other Rehabilitation Methods (1, 2, 3, 4)

A. Soft Tissue Mobilization

  1. Myofascial release
  2. Trigger Point Work
  3. Massage Techniques
  4. Joint Mobilization
    1. Peripheral Joints
    2. Spinal Traction
  5. Other Manual Therapy Methods
    1. Strain Counter Strain
    2. Muscle Energy Technique
    3. Dural Tension
    4. Craniosacral Techniques
    5. Bodywork (Feldenkrais, Alexander, etc)
    6. Other

V. Psychology (2, 3, 4)

A. Stages of Loss

B. Coping Mechanisms

C. Role of the Athletic Trainer, Coach, and teammates

D. Implementation with the phases of rehabilitation

 

Exams, Activities, and Projects:

Case Study (1) (1, 2, 3, 4)

Written portion- 100 points 200 points

Oral Presentation- 100 points

Choose an athlete with a significant time-loss injury. Obtain and review all history. Obtain MD and PT reports including operative reports and radiography reports as available. Attend as many MD appointments as possible. Design and implement a training room rehabilitation program including goals and progression. Make daily appointments for rehabilitation sessions with this athlete. Keep daily progress notes. Monitor and facilitate all progressions. Prepare Case Study for written and oral presentation at end of semester.

Rehab Notebook (2, 3, 4)

(Mini Rehab Papers) (8) 25 points/paper 200 points

 

One will be completed for each of the following- ankle, knee, hip/groin, shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand, lumbar or thoracic spine, and cervical spine. Identify

Rehab/ practice. Will need to get a binder and tabs to separate. Portions will be due during the school semester, you will have a chance to make corrections, and the final notebook with corrections will be turned in during finals.

 

Article Review (4) (1, 2, 3)

25points/ paper 100 points

Find and copy an article from a peer-reviewed journal that is research, not a review of literature. Read the article; write a short review that includes the purpose of the study, why it is important to study, the methods used, the outcome of the study, and the significance of the results. Then write a personal critique of the method, your opinion of the study, and/or any problems you find with the study. Should be approximately 2 pages in length.

1 = Lower Body Treatment Method

2 = Upper Body Treatment Method

3 = Spinal Treatment Methods

4 = Alternative Methods/ treatments

Exams (3) 100 points/ exam 300 points

Lab Reports/ Work sheets (10) 10 points/ sheet 100 points

Total Points for the semester 900 points

 

 

 

 

Grades:

A= 90% - 100% 810-900 points

B= 80% - 89% 720-809 points

C= 70% - 79% 630-719 points

D= 60% - 69% 540-629 points

F= 59% and Below 539 and Below

 

Therapeutic Exercise

This content area is a collection of the knowledge, skills, and values that the entry-level certified athletic trainer must possess to plan, implement, document, and evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic exercise programs for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of the injuries and illnesses or athletes and others involved in physical activity.

Cognitive Domain

1. Predicts the physiological process of wound healing and tissue repair and its implications (limitations, contraindications) on the development and progression of an appropriate rehabilitation or reconditioning program.

2. Describes and interprets appropriate measurement and functional testing procedures as they relate to therapeutic exercise (e.g., use of isokinetic devices, goniomieters and dynamometers postural stability test, hop tests, specific function tests).

3. Uses objective measurement results (muscular strength/endurance, range or motion) as a basis for developing individualized rehabilitation or reconditioning programs.

4. Describes common surgical techniques, pathology, and any subsequent anatomical alterations that may affect the implementation of a rehabilitation or reconditioning exercise program.

5. Interprets the results of injury assessment and determines an appropriate rehabilitation or reconditioning plan to return the patient to physical activity.

6. Defines the basic components of activity-specific functional progressions in a therapeutic exercise program.

7. Describes the mechanical principles applied to the design and use of rehabilitation or reconditioning exercise equipment (leverage, force).

8 Recommends the appropriate therapeutic exercise plan and determines appropriate therapeutic goals and objectives based on the initial assessment, frequent reassessments, and appropriate goal setting.

9 Describes the appropriate selection and application of therapeutic exercises taking the following into consideration:

a. the physiological responses of the human body to trauma

b. the physiological effects of inactivity and immobilization on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, nervous, and respiratory systems of the human body

c. the associated anatomical and/or biomechanical alterations of commonly used primary and

reconstrucitve surgery

d. the physiological adaptations induced by the various forms of therapeutic exercise, such is

fast- versus slow-twitch muscle fibers

e. the physiological responses of additional factors, such as age and disease.

es, progress notes)

10. Describes the indications, contraindications, theory, and principles for the incorporation and application of various contemporary therapeutic exercises, including the following:

a. isometric, isotonic, and isokinetic exercise

b. eccentric versus concentric exercise

c. open- versus closed-kinematic chain exercise

d. elastic, mechanical, and manual resistance exercise

e. joint mobilization exercise

f. plyometrics-dynamic reactive exercise

g. proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) for muscular strength/endurance, muscle

stretching, and improved range of motion

h. exercises to improve neuromuscular coordination and proprioception

i. passive, active, and active-assisted exercise

j. cardiovascular exercise, including the use of stationary bicycles, upper-body ergometer,

treadmill, and stair climber

k. aquatic therapy

1. functional rehabilitation and reconditioning

m. sport-specific activity

n. soft tissue mobilization

11. Revises goals and objectives, and develops criteria for progression and return to activity, based on the level of functional outcomes.

12. Describes appropriate methods of assessing rehabilitation and reconditioning progress and interprets the results.

13. Interprets physician notes, post-operative notes, and physician prescriptions as they pertain to a rehabilitation or reconditioning plan.

14. Describes rehabilitation, functional, and reconditioning progress using follow-up notes, progress notes, SOAP notes, etc.

15. Compares the effectiveness of taping, wrapping, bracing, and other supportive/protective methods for facilitation of safe progression to advanced therapeutic exercises and functional activities.

16. Applies manufacturer's guidelines for the inspection and maintenance of therapeutic exercise equipment.

Psychomotor Domain

1. Demonstrates appropriate methods of evaluating rehabilitation and reconditioning progress and interpreting results.

2. Measures the physical effects of injury using contemporary methods (isokinetic devices, goniometers, dynamometers, manual muscle testing, calipers, functional testing) and uses this data as a basis for developing individualized rehabilitation or reconditioning programs.

3 Records rehabilitation or reconditioning progress (e.g., follow-up notes, progress notes).

4. Demonstrates the appropriate application of contemporary therapeutic exercises including the following:

a. isometric, isotonic, and isokinetic exercise

b. eccentric versus concentric exercise

c. open- versus closed-kinematic chain exercise

d. elastic, mechanical, and manual resistance exercise

e. joint mobilization exercise

f plyometrics-dynamic reactive exercise

g. proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) for muscular strength/endurance, muscle

stretching, and improved range of motion

h. exercises to improve neuromuscular coordination and proprioception

i. passive, active, and active-assisted exercise

j. cardiovascular exercise, including the use of stationary bicycles, upper-body ergometer,

treadmill, and stair climber

k. aquatic therapy

1. functional rehabilitation and reconditioning

m. sport-specific activity

n. soft tissue mobilization

5 Demonstrates the proper techniques for the performance of commonly prescribed rehabilitation and reconditioning exercises.

6. Performs a functional assessment for safe return to physical activity

7 Inspects therapeutic exercise equipment to ensure safe operating condition.

Affective Domain

1. Accepts the professional, ethical, and legal parameters that define the proper role of the certified athletic trainer in the treatment, rehabilitation, or reconditioning of athletes and others involved in physical activity.

2 Accepts the moral and ethical obligation to provide rehabilitation or reconditioning to athletes and others involved in physical activity to the fullest extent possible.

3 Respects the proper role of attending physicians and other medical and paramedical personnel in the treatment and rehabilitation or reconditioning of athletes and others involved in physical activity.

4 Respects accepted medical and paramedical protocols regarding the confidentiality of medical information, medical and therapeutic prescriptions, and health care referral as they relate to the rehabilitation or reconditioning process.

Risk Management and Injury Prevention

Psychomotor Domain

7. Able to operate contemporary isometric, isotonic, and isokinetic strength testing devices.