Approved by Faculty Senate March 17, 2003

Department of  History

 New Course Proposal

 Course Number: 214

 Course Title: The Mississippi River in U.S. History

 Credits: 3

 Frequency of Offering: Yearly

 Prerequisites: None

 Grading: Grade Only

 Applies to: Major, Minor, and University Studies

            A.  Course Description

 

                                          1.             Catalog description

 

A survey of the significance of the Mississippi River in U.S. history. The course emphasizes the role of the river in the native-American life and early European exploration of the mid-west, and the efforts of European powers and the newly created U.S. to control the river. The course also studies the role of the river in economic change, slavery, pre-Civil War immigration, and federal policy. The course will also consider the western theater of the Civil War, the post-war bridging of the river and industrial development along it, and its 20th-century flooding, damning, and related controversies.

 

                                          2.             Statement of the major focus and objectives of the course.

 

This course will focus on the connections between the Mississippi River and overall U.S. historical development. Consequently, students in the course will study both selected Mississippi-oriented episodes such as Europeans’ 17th- and 18th-century explorations of the upper Mississippi and contacts with native American groups, 19th-century steam-boating, and 20th-century floods and related developments in U.S. history that students would encounter in college-level survey courses such as History 150: US History to 1865 and History 151: US History Since 1865.

 

The course also contributes to the Residential College cluster of courses focused on the Mississippi River.

 

 

 

 

                                          3.             Course Outline of the Major Topics and Subtopics

 

 

                              I.      Course Introduction

                                          A.             Description of the Mississippi River system and Mississippi Valley

                                          B.  The Relationship Between Regional and National History

                                          C.             The Debate over the Role of the Frontier in the Shaping of US Institutions

 

                              II.      Natives and Newcomers on the 17th and 18th-century Mississippi

                                          A.             Dakota People and the Upper Mississippi

                                          B.             European Exploration and European-Dakota Relations along the Upper Mississippi

                                          C.             The Founding of New Orleans and St. Louis

                                          D.             Comparison of Upper Mississippi experience with eastern experience.

 

                              III.      Great Power Politics on the Mississippi

                                          A.             French, Spanish and British Plans for the Mississippi

                                          B.             The American Revolution

                                          C.             The Haitian Revolution and the Louisiana Purchase

 

                              IV.      Ante-Bellum Development of the Mississippi

                                          A.             River Improvements and National Politics

                                          B.             Steam-boating and Federal Regulation

                                          C.             River Towns and Commerce

                                          D.             The New Orleans-Mississippi Immigration Route

                                          E.             Slavery along the Lower Mississippi River

                                          F.             Mississippi River States

                                          G.             Mark Twain’s Mississippi River

                                          H.             Dred Scott’s Mississippi River

                                          I.             The Mississippi in Ante-Bellum America

 

                              V.        The Civil War Along the Mississippi

                                          A.             Abe Lincoln’s Mississippi Journey

                                          B.             Southern Dreams and the Western Theater

                                          C.             General Grant’s Mississippi

                                          D.             The Western Theater the Outcome of the War

 

                              VI.      Bridging the 19th-Century Mississippi

                                          A.             The Rock Island Bridge

                                          B.             The Eads Bridge

                                          C.             The Mississippi River Commission (1879)

                                          D.             Bridges, Railroads and Urban Empires in Gilded Age America

 

 

 

 

                              VII.      Progressive Reform Along the Mississippi

                                          A.             The Mississippi Valley and 20th-Century U.S. Foreign Policy

                                          B.             Progressive Conservationists’ Critique of the Mississippi River Commission River Management

                                          C.             Upper Mississippi Reform

                                          D.             Lower Mississippi Reform

                                          E.             The Mississippi Valley and U.S. Overseas Expansion

 

                              VIII.     The 1927 Flood

                                          A.             The Limits of Progressive and 1920s Voluntarism and Disaster Relief

                                          B.             Lower Mississippi Conditions, Louisiana Politics and the Coming of Huey Long

 

                              IX.       A  New Deal for the Mississippi

A. Locks and Dams as Work Relief and River Management

B. Mississippi Delta Cotton, Southern Labor and the Agricultural Adjustment Administration

 

                              X.        The Mississippi River and the Great Society

                                          A.             Civil Rights on the Lower Mississippi

                                          B.             Levees (including Winona’s) on the Upper Mississippi

 

                              XI.      Contemporary River Uses and Environmental Justice

                                          A.             Water Quality

                                          B.             Barge Traffic and Lobbyists

                                          C.             The Army Corps of Engineers

                                          D.             Environmentalists’ Visions

                                          E.             The 1993 Flood and its Winners and Losers

 

4. Basic Instructional Plan

 

The course will feature some lectures, a significant amount of small group and class discussion, and student reports based upon primary historical sources (newspapers and other periodicals as well as government documents) available via the WSU library.

 

5. Course Requirements

 

The course will require each student to complete written midterm and final exams, a paper on an assigned topic, and a group research project using the primary sources concerning the river that are available at or via the WSU library.

 

6. Textbooks

 

The course readings will be selected from among the following:

 

Douglas Brinkley and Stephen Ambrose, The Mississippi and the Making of A Nation from the Louisiana Purchase to the Today (2002)

Clayton Anderson, Kinsmen of Another Kind, Dakota-White Relations in the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1650-1862 (1984)

Robert W. Jackson, Rails Across the Mississippi, A History of the St. Louis Bridge (2001)

Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

John M. Barry, Rising Tide, The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How it Changed America (1997)

James Cobb, The Most Southern Place on Earth, The Mississippi Delta and Roots of Southern Regional Identity (1992)

Eddy Harris, Mississippi Solo (1988)

Frederick Jackson Turner, “The Significance of the Frontier in American History” (1893)

John G. Burke, “Bursting Boilers and Federal Power,” (1966)

Frederick Jackson Turner, “The Significance of the Frontier in American History” (1893)

Excerpts from Howard Miller, Alexander Yard, Kathy Corbett, Mary Seematter, St. Louis in American History (1988-1991)

John G. Burke, “Bursting Boilers and Federal Power,” (1966)

Pinchot, Gifford. "Some Essential Principles of Water Conservation as Applied to Mississippi Flood Control."(January 1928)

Parker, Walter. "Curbing the Mississippi."(May 1927)

Robinson, Michael C. "The Relationship Between the Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Community, 1920-1969."(1989)

 

Websites:

http://www.mvd.usace.army.mil/main.php [US Army Corps of Engineers, Mississippi Valley Division]

http://www.fmr.org/ [Friends of the Mississippi River]

http://www.mrba.org/ [Mississippi River Basin Alliance]

 

 

7. List of References/Bibliography

 

Ambrose, Stephen, Brinkley, Douglas, and Abell, Samuel. The Mississippi and the Making of A Nation From the Louisiana Purchase to Today. Washington, D.C.: The National Geographic Society, 2002.

 

Banta, Martha, “The Boys and the Bosses: Twain’s Double Take on Work, Play and the Democratic Ideal,” American Literary History, 3 (1991), 487-520.

 

Barry, John M.  Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How it Changed America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997.

 

Billington, Ray Allen. Westward Expansion: A History of the American Frontier. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co., 1982.

 

Burke, John G. “Bursting Boilers and Federal Power,” Technology and Culture, 7 (1966), 1-23.

 

Clay, Floyd M. A Century on the Mississippi: A History of the Memphis District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1876-1981. Memphis, TN: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1986.

 

Cobb, James C. The Most Southern Place on Earth, The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.

 

Cowdrey, Albert E. This Land, This South: an Environmental History. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 1983.

 

Daniel, Pete. Deep'n As It Come: The 1927 Mississippi River Flood. New York: Oxford University Press, 1977.

 

DeSantis, Vincent P. "President Hayes' Southern Policy." Journal of Southern History 21 (November 1955): 476-491.

 

Fries, Robert F. “The Mississippi River Logging Company and the Struggle for the Free Navigation of Logs, 1865-1900,” Mississippi Valley Historical Review, 35 (1948), 429-448.

 

Harris, Eddy,  Mississippi Solo. New York, NY: N. Lyons Books, 1988.

 

Hass, William H. “The Mississippi River – Asset or Liability?” Economic Geography, 7 (1931), 252-262.

 

Hill, Forest G. Roads, Rails, & Waterways: The Army Engineers and Early Transportation. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1957.

 

Hunter, Louis C. “The Invention of the Western Steamboat,” Journal of Economic History, 3 (1943), 201-220.

 

Jackson, Robert W. Rails Across the Mississippi, A History of the St. Louis Bridge. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2001.

 

Lane, E.W. "History of Flood Control on the Mississippi." Civil Engineering 4 (February 1934): 63-67.

 

McBride, Mary G. and Ann M. McLaurin. "The Origin of the Mississippi River Commission." Louisiana History 36 (Fall 1995): 389-411.

 

McDermott, John Francis. Before Mark Twain, A Sampler of Old, Old Times on the Mississippi. Carbondale, IL.: Southern Illinois University Press, 1968.

 

Mahony, Timothy. “Urban History in a Regional Context: River Towns on the Upper Mississippi, 1840-1860,” Journal of American History, 72 (1985), 318-339.

 

Mahoney, Timothy. River Towns in the Great West, The Structure of Provincial Urbanization in the American Midwest, 1820-1870. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.

 

Miller, Howard, Yard, Alexander, Corbett, Katharine, See Matter, Mary. St. Louis in American Life. St. Louis: Missouri Historical Society, 1988-.

 

Morgan, Arthur E. Dams and Other Disasters: A Century of the Army Corps of Engineers in Civil Works. Boston: P. Sargent, 1971.

 

Nettles, Curtis, “The Mississippi Valley and the Constitution,” Mississippi Valley Historical Review, 3 (1924), 332-357.

 

Parker, Walter. "Curbing the Mississippi." The Nation 124 (May 1927): 521-22.

 

Pabis, George S. "Delaying the Deluge: The Engineering Debate over Flood Control on the Lower Mississippi River, 1846-1861." The Journal of Southern History 64, Number 4 (1998): 421-444.

 

Pinchot, Gifford. "Some Essential Principles of Water Conservation as Applied to Mississippi Flood Control." The Annals 135 (January 1928): 57-59.

 

Reuss, Martin. "Andrew A. Humphreys and the Development of Hydraulic Engineering: Politics and Technology in the Army Corps of Engineers, 1850-1950." Technology and Culture 26 (January 1985): 1-33.

 

Reuss, Martin. "The Army Corps of Engineers and Flood-Control Politics on the Lower Mississippi." Louisiana History 23 (1982): 131-48.

 

Robinson, Michael C. The Mississippi River Commission: An American Epic. Vicksburg, MS: Mississippi River Commission, 1989.

 

Robinson, Michael C. "The Relationship Between the Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Community, 1920-1969." Environmental Review 13 (Spring 1989): 1-41.

 

Saxon, Lyle. Father Mississippi. New York: The Century Club, 1927.

 

Scott, Quinta and Miller, Howard. The Eads Bridge. Columbia, MO.: University of Missouri Press, 1979.

 

Severin, Timothy, Explorers of the Mississippi.1967 rpt. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota press, 2001.

 

Shallat, Todd A. Structures in the Stream: Water, Science, and the Rise of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 1994

 

Twain, Mark. Life on the Mississippi. New York: Bantam Books, 1981 (1883).

 

Winston, James E. “The Mississippi Whigs and the Tariff, 1834-1844,” Mississippi Valley Historical Review, 22 (1936). 505-524.

 

                              B.             Rationale

 

This course will contribute the Residential College cluster focused on the Mississippi River. It is also a significant addition to the History Department’s offerings, using the most prominent feature of the region’s geography to engage students in the study of U.S. history.

 

No other course will be banked or dropped if this proposal wins approval.

 

                              C.             Notification

 

This course will not change the size of any program.

 

                              D.  “G” Courses.

 

The Department is not proposing this course for graduate credit.

 

                              E.   General Education

 

The Department is proposing the course for inclusion on the Universities Studies Program. The proposal is attached.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Financial and Staffing Data Sheet

For New Course Proposals

 

PROPOSED COURSE: No.:     214      Title:    The Mississippi River in U.S. History    Credits:   3    

 

PROPOSED AS:     Required Course _________    Elective Course _____X____

 

Specify titles of programs in which the course will be required/elective:

 

History Major and Minor

Social Science/History

University Studies

    

PLEASE PROVIDE A NARRATIVE STATEMENT AND SPECIFIC DATA TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS.

 

                                        1.     Would this course be taught with existing staff or with new/additional staff?

 

This course would be taught with existing staff. It would require no additional faculty.

 

 

 

                                        2.     How would this new course impact on current course offerings (i.e. change the number of sections of current offerings, dropping/banking of courses, etc.)?

 

The department would offer sections this course in place of sections of the U.S. history survey courses History 150 and 151. This would have minimal impact on students since the department plans to accept History 214 as an alternative to either History 150 or History 151 (at the student’s discretion) for History majors and minors and Social Science/History majors. In addition, the department is proposing the course for the University Studies Program (History 150 and History 151 currently carry University Studies credit); if approved for it, the offering of this course would leave the department’s contribution to the University Studies Program unchanged. 

 

                                        3.     How would this new course impact the department’s budget (e.g. equipment, supplies, instructional resources, etc.)?

 

The course could have a small impact on the department’s budget. Offering it may involve a slightly more photocopying of assigned readings than the standard section of History 150 or 151, and the department may need to purchase a video or two focused on Mississippi River history that it might not otherwise purchase. On balance, however, the impact would be small.

 

 

Signed: __________________________

Department Chairperson

 

           __________________________

College Dean

 

 

 

 

 

University Studies Course Approval

 

 Department or Program: History

 

Course Number: 214

 

Semester Hours: 3

 

Frequency of Offering: Annually

 

Course Title: The Mississippi River in U.S. History

 

Catalog Description:

 

A survey of the significance of the Mississippi River in U.S. history. The course emphasizes the role of the river in the native-American life and early European exploration of the mid-west, and the efforts of European powers and the newly created U.S. to control the river. The course also studies the role of the river in economic change, slavery, pre-Civil War immigration, and federal policy. The course will also consider the western theater of the Civil War, the post-war bridging of the river and industrial development along it, and its 20th-century flooding, damning, and related controversies.

 

This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2:

NO

 

This is a new course proposal:

YES

 

University Studies Category:

Arts and Sciences Core/ Humanities

 

Department Contact Person:

Alex Yard

ayard@winona.edu

 

 Rationale:

 

The department strongly believes that this course will play a significant role in

Universities Studies program by providing students with an appreciation for the historical context of human experiences and cultures along the Mississippi River and an improved understanding of the discipline of history.

 

USP Humanities Objective 1

 

The University studies program requires that courses in the Humanities promote students' ability to identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular Humanities Discipline.

 

History 214 both will introduce students to significant bodies of information about the American past, a vital element of the discipline, but will also encourage students to seek out connections between local/regional events and national trends. Moreover, the course will introduce students to historical explanations, the intellectual skills of historians, and the ways in which historian conceive of and write about the past. In addition, the course will ask students (as well as the instructor) to explore whether or not the Mississippi River Valley is a sensible unit for understanding U.S. politics and cultures akin to the nation state and regions of north and south.

 

The courses introduce students to the main lines of historical development along the river. The specific sets of facts and subplots emphasized will differ from instructor to instructor and year to year, but students will experience the same general chronology.

 

The courses introduce students to the principle elements of history as a discipline. Both aim at developing students' abilities to identify and evaluate various kinds of evidence used by historians to identify themes (as opposed to collections of facts) in historical literature, to relate events in one region to those in others, and to write clearly. Both courses also invite students to begin using historical evidence to construct explanations of the past and discuss relationships among events.

 

The courses do all of this by means of lectures, readings of both primary documents and historical literature, class discussions (both small-group and full-class discussions), tests, and writing assignments.

 

USP Humanities Objective 2:

 

Objective 2 asks courses to promote students’ ability to understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations.

 

History 214 addresses this objective in two distinct ways. In part, the courses explore how people in the past had differing perceptions and interpretations of the events of their times. In large part these divergent perceptions and interpretations resulted from their differing historical experiences, cultural values and genders. The course provide students with an abundance of episodes that provided occasion for expression of divergent perceptions ranging from the contrasting uses of the River by natives and European newcomers in the 17th and 18th centuries to the social structures of river towns, race relations in the Delta, and divergent Army Corps and contemporary environmentalist views of proper uses of the river.

 

The courses also address this issue by introducing students to the varying ways in which historians themselves perceive and interpret the past, and it begins to explore the sources of these differences.

 

The courses attempt to achieve this objective through lectures, reading assignments focused on both document drawn from the times and historians' discussions of the past, small group and class discussions, and writing assignments.

 

USP Humanities Objective 3:

 

The University Studies Program requires courses in the Humanities to promote students' ability to understand the role of critical analysis (e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical, rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expressions of human experience.

 

History 214 addresses this objective by emphasizing the role of historical analysis in understanding past as well as contemporary developments. The courses, in other words, direct students' attention of the task of explaining, and not just remembering, past events, including ideas and their expression in a wide range forms. The courses direct student attention to the critical documents relate to river developments, for example, as well as those of a wide range of Mississippi Valley peoples’ attempts to celebrate, criticize and/or make sense of their societies. The courses, in other words, challenge students to understand how events and ideas came to be as they were.

 

The courses attempt to achieve this objective through lectures, reading assignments focused on both document drawn from the times and historians' discussions of the past, small group and class discussions, and writing assignments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Representative Syllabus for

History 214: The Mississippi River in U.S. History

Appended to University Studies Proposal

January, 2003

 

 

 

History 214: The Mississippi River in U.S. History

This course counts in the Humanities Category of the University Studies program

 

Fall, 2003                                                                                                         Prof. Yard

MWF, 1-1:50                                                                                                  215 Minne Hall

 

 

This course will introduce students to the human history of the Mississippi River and its role in U.S. history. The course will investigate historical episodes and trends in the history of the Mississippi Valley and related them to national developments of the sort you would find a textbook for a survey course in U.S. history. The course will also enhance your understanding of the reading, thinking and writing skills used by historians.

 

The course will emphasize small group and class discussion as well as featuring lectures. Successful discussion participation requires keeping up with the reading. As a further incentive to complete the reading assignments, the course features quizzes on which you will be able to display your grasp of the readings.

 

Students will also complete two written exams, a 5-10 page paper on an assigned topic, and a group research project focused on testing a generalization about the Mississippi Valley or its relationship to national developments. This last assignment will make use of the historical sources and government documents held in the WSU library and will involve both written papers and oral reports to the class.

 

I will determine the final grade according to the following formula:

 

Quizzes: 20%

Midterm Exam: 20%

Final Exam: 20%

Assigned Paper: 20%

Research Project: 20%

 

 

 

University Studies Note

 

This course is included in the Humanities category of the WSU University Studies program. Consequently it will address the following three objectives required of all courses approved for this category:

 

                              A.  To promote students’ ability to identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular Humanities discipline.

 

This course does this by requiring you to study of the chronology of Mississippi Valley history. You will also study works of historians of selected episodes of Mississippi Valley history and to relate episodes in Mississippi Valley history to the larger developments in U.S. history. Moreover, you will complete exams that require you to place information in historical context, relating one body of information to others. In addition, you will complete a paper in which you relate a particular episode to other themes, and you will complete a research paper in which you test a historical generalization against primary sources you locate. Finally, throughout the course, you will explore the extent to which the Mississippi Valley is sensible unit of historical analysis, like north and south, just as professional historians might do.

 

                              B.   To promote students’ ability to understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions and interpretations.

 

The course will address this by exploring why the historical actors we encounter acted as they did and the assigned historians explained events as they did in the small group discussions. Of particular relevance to this objective will be the discussions of the differing views of slavery, Progressive Era conflicts between business interests and Teddy Roosevelt-type conservationists,  and the conflicting visions of contemporary river use among between the Army Corps of Engineers, barge company lobbyists like former congressman Tim Penny, and environmental organizations. You will also address this objective as you prepare for the written exam and the assigned paper that will require you place specific events in their historical context.

 

                              C.  To promote students’ ability to understand the role of critical analysis (e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical, rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expressions of human experience.

 

The course will address this objective in the small group discussions of historical literature and in the group research project. In the discussions, students will focus among other things on how historians use sources and evidence to discuss the past. In the research project, you will use sources and evidence to evaluate a historian’s generalization about the region or the region’s relationship to national developments.

 

 

 

 

Assigned Readings

 

Books

Douglas Brinkley and Stephen Ambrose, The Mississippi and the Making of A Nation from the Louisiana Purchase to the Today (2002)

Clayton Anderson, Kinsmen of Another Kind, Dakota-White Relations in the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1650-1862 (1984)

Robert W. Jackson, Rails Across the Mississippi, A History of the St. Louis Bridge (2001)

John M. Barry, Rising Tide, The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How it Changed America (1997)

James Cobb, The Most Southern Place on Earth, The Mississippi Delta and Roots of Southern Regional Identity (1992)

 

Handouts/On Reserve

Frederick Jackson Turner, “The Significance of the Frontier in American History” (1893)

Excerpts from Howard Miller, Alexander Yard, Kathy Corbett, Mary. See Matter, St. Louis in American History (1988-1991)

John G. Burke, “Bursting Boilers and Federal Power,” (1966)

Pinchot, Gifford. "Some Essential Principles of Water Conservation as Applied to Mississippi Flood Control." The Annals 135 (January 1928): 57-59.

Parker, Walter. "Curbing the Mississippi." The Nation 124 (May 1927): 521-22.

Robinson, Michael C. "The Relationship Between the Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Community, 1920-1969." Environmental Review 13 (Spring 1989): 1-41.

 

Assigned Websites:

http://www.mvd.usace.army.mil/main.php [US Army Corps of Engineers, Mississippi Valley Division]

http://www.fmr.org/ [Friends of the Mississippi River]

http://www.mrba.org/ [Mississippi River Basin Alliance]

 

Course Outline

 

Week 1             Course Introduction: The River and American History

 

Ambrose et al, The Mississippi, chap. 1

Frederick Jackson Turner, “The Significance of the Frontier in American History” (1893) (Handout)

 

Week 2             Natives and Newcomers on the 17th and 18th-century Mississippi

 

Anderson, Kinsmen of Another Kind, chaps. 1-4

 

Week 3             Great Power Politics  on the Mississippi

 

Ambrose et al, The Mississippi, chap, 2

Anderson, Kinsmen of Another Kind, chap.5

Extracts from Miller, Yard et al , St. Louis in American History (handout)

 

Week 4             Ante-Bellum Development of the Lower Mississippi

 

Ambrose et al, The Mississippi, chaps.3, 4

Cobb, Most Southern Place on Earth, chap. 1

 

Week 5             Ante-Bellum Development of the Mid and Upper Mississippi

 

Ambrose et al, The Mississippi, chap. 7, 9

Extracts from Miller, Yard et al , St. Louis in American History (handout)

John G. Burke, “Bursting Boilers and Federal Power,” (1966) (handout)

Anderson, Kinsmen of Another Kind, chaps.6-8

 

Week 6:             The Civil War on the Mississippi

 

Ambrose et al, The Mississippi, chaps. 5 and 6

Cobb, Most Southern Place, chap. 2

Anderson, Kinsmen of Another Kind, chap. 12

 

Week 7             Midterm Exam and Conferences

 

In-class midterm exam

Conferences on Group Research Project Topics

 

Week 8:           Bridging the 19th-Century Mississippi

 

Jackson, Rails Across the Mississippi

 

Week 9             The New South on the Mississippi

 

Cobb, Most Southern Place, chaps. 3-6

 

Week 10             Progressives Manage the River

 

Pinchot, Gifford. "Some Essential Principles of Water Conservation as Applied to Mississippi Flood Control," and Parker, Walter. "Curbing the Mississippi," (Handouts).

 

Extracts taken from http://www.mvd.usace.army.mil/main.php [US Army Corps of Engineers, Mississippi Valley Division]

 

Week 11             The 1927 Mississippi Flood,1920s Small-Government Voluntarism, and Disaster Relief

Required Paper Due

 

Barry, Rising Tide, The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How it Changed America,

parts. 1-7

 

Week 12             The New Deal on the Mississippi

 

Barry, Rising Tide, The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927, parts 8-9

Ambrose et al, The Mississippi, chaps.8, 10

Cobb, Most Southern Place, chaps. 7-10

 

Week 13:             A Great Society on the Mississippi

 

Ambrose et al, The Mississippi, chap11

Cobb, Most Southern Place, chap.11-13

 

Week 14             The Contemporary Debate over Use and Justice on the River

 

Robinson, Michael C. "The Relationship Between the Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Community, 1920-1969." (on reserve)

Extracts from:             http://www.mvd.usace.army.mil/main.php [US Army Corps of Engineers, Mississippi Valley Division]

http://www.fmr.org/ [Friends of the Mississippi River]

http://www.mrba.org/ [Mississippi River Basin Alliance]

 

Week 15             Research Project Reports – Oral Presentations

                        Re-evaluation of Turner’s Frontier Thesis

 

Week 16             Final Exam