Approved by University Studies Sub-committee. A2C2 action pending.

 

University Studies Course Approval Application

Department/Program: History

Course Number: 165 Number of Credits: 3

Course Title: Latin American History

Catalog Description:
A survey of Latin American history from pre-Columbian times to present including the colonial period, the struggle for independence and the rise of modern Latin American nations. Special emphasis is placed on Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico. Grade only.

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2: Yes

 This is a new course proposal: No

Department Contact Person:

Jackie Stroud
Jstroud@winona.edu

History 165: Latin American History

University Studies Category:

Unity and Diversity: Global Perspectives

 University Studies Outcome A: To promote students' abilities to understand the role of the world citizen and the responsibility world citizens' share for their common global future.

By introducing students to the historical structures and life components of Latin America, it is the hope of the department that they will benefit and have a better understanding of the world "global citizen". The United States, Europe, Asia, and Latin America have had historical bonds, in a way these areas have been 'acting' global for a long period of time. Students will have the opportunity to learn the history and culture of Latin America and how it intersects with other countries and their people. It is the belief that students understanding of the historical past can more easily identify ideas about diversity. Helping students accomplish the goal of understanding the shrinking world and their role in that world is an important component of this course.

Latin American History promotes these ideas in several ways. By using a variety of films, documentaries, readings, textbooks, and scholarly articles the student is made aware of the world of Latin Americans. We begin with the earliest indigenous populations, European colonization, Independence, and work our way through to modern day Latin America. By looking at the political, economic, racial, religious, and gender structures of Latin America we hope the student will begin a new, better, or more comprehensive understanding of their history; they will also be able to understand the role of other countries in the history of Latin Americans.

Understanding the internal and external relationships of Latin American is a fundamental part of this course Students will also explore ideas and philosophies such as colonization, imperialism, Marxism, militarism, and nationalism. Because this course involves 33+ countries, 5 distinct regional areas, and a wide-range of those in the Latin American Diaspora, it would be impossible to teach this course in-depth for any one nation. The course therefore focuses on the commonalties as well as the stark differences in their historical, social, cultural, and religious constructs.

 

 

 

 

University Studies Outcome B: To promote students' abilities to describe and analyze social economical political, spiritual or environmental elements that influence the relations between living beings and their environments or between societies.

 

The department believes that History 165 will enable students to understand relations among and between Latin American nations/regions; it will also help students understand the relationship between Latin America, United States, Europe and Asia.

This course explores the colonization, political and economic development, migration, and immigration. All these areas are connected historically in Latin America, so it would benefit the student taking this course because it is designed to help them describe and analyze these relationships. This can be done in a variety of ways: lecture, guest speakers, film, documentaries, reading of texts, monographs, and scholarly journal articles. This course is also designed to help students understand the long duree; the long structure of historical events and relationship to the present. This gives students the opportunity to explore how complex these relationships have been in the past and may help them understand the world they live in now.

One of the best ways to effective understanding includes small group discussion focused around works by Latin Americans. These readings include novels, monographs, monographic studies and journal articles. Students are also required to write five to seven page reading analysis, which helps them focus their arguments and understandings on a specific topic. These usually include topics of race, class, gender, ethnicity, religion, and/or other historical constructs.

 

 

University Studies Outcome C: To promote student's abilities to identify and analyze specific global issues, illustrating the social economic political spiritual or environmental difference that may affect their resolution.

Students can see and understand "others" history in comparison to their own. This can be a useful tool if you can help them stand back and see the global picture or the "bigger picture" and how the histories of these countries cannot help but be inter-related. Rarely after 1492 can, the "Americas" be studied in isolation. By 1500 the world has become global in many ways. It is the intent of this course to help the student see how this happens. This course will attempt through lecture, media, and readings to give students' the tools to develop views, opinions, and appreciation for the Americas. We try in this course to use as much material written/translated by Latin Americans as possible. This includes both reading and media. The last component assigned for this course is a ten-fifteen page research paper on an approved topic in Latin American history. They are required to use both secondary and primary sources, which also puts them in touch with other perspectives and most time global. Latin Americans look inward and outward to understand the world. It is the hope of the department that students taking this course will learn from the example set forth.

 

REPRESENTATIVE SYLLABUS

History 165 -History of Latin America University Studies Program Course

Unity and Diversity: Global Perspectives

Semester/Year

Class Information

  bulletThe Design: This course is designed to help the student gain a new, better, or more comprehensive understanding of Latin America and Latin Americans. This course is also designed to meet the criteria of specific learning principles undertaken by the department of history.

  bulletTo enhance students' ability to critically read and evaluate historical scholarship bulletTo develop students' ability to express their ideas clearly in written form. bulletTo enhance students' ability to express their ideas in oral form. bulletTo develop in students the understanding that history is actually an on-going interpretive debate and not a series of short answers. bulletTo enhance students' capacity for independent, critical thought. bulletTo develop students' understanding of both long-term trends and discrete events in the history of the united States, Europe and at least to other cultural groups bulletTo enhance students' toleration of diverse peoples and cultures bulletTo develop students' commitment to a life-long search for learning and truth. bulletRequired Text: Richard S. Hillman Edt. Understanding Contemporary Latin America.

Donald F. Stevens Edt. Based on a True Story: Latin American History at the Movies.

Various Authors of Latin American Novels - Picked by lottery

Various Articles supplied to class or placed on Reserve in Library bulletUniversity Studies Program Notes

This course meets the requirements as a Global Perspectives course within the Unity and Diversity category of the University Studies Program. This course is therefore designed to include specific requirements and learning activities:

A) To promote students' abilities to understand the role of the world citizen and the responsibility all world citizens share for their common global future.

 

Students will be exposed to a wide variety of philosophies and ideas that develop through the use of monographs, foreign film, reading of scholarly journals, small group discussions, ideas shared through textbooks and comparative study. Students will also be exposed to new historiographies in history; new studies in issues such as race, class and gender make a major contribution to this course.

 

B) To promote students' abilities to describe and analyze social, economic, political, spiritual or environmental elements that influences the relations between living beings and their environments or between societies.

Student will, on a weekly basis, be exposed to all the areas listed above. Latin American History is presented from the organic whole. We discuss the internal and external structures of Latin American people. Latin America is a multi-faceted, complex idea. Students will be able to explore any of these areas in depth through a research project or on the surface through basic discussions in class. Through group discussion and use of a wide variety of teaching materials the student will be presented with many ways of looking at Latin America and Latin American History.

C) To promote students' abilities to identify and analyze specific global issues, illustrating the social economic, political, spiritual or environmental differences that may affect their resolution.

For many years Latin Americanist have been teaching Latin American History from a global perspective because there is hardly any other way to teach this history. The Americas, after 1492, become interconnected to the world and the world to the Americas.

  bulletBreakdown for Grade:

Acting as a discussion leader for film 30%

Reading Group discussion leader &

Writing book review 30%

Research Paper 30%

Participation 10% bulletHandouts - Students will be given handouts that outline requirements for discussion, book review, and research paper.

 

 

History of Latin America- Tuesday/Thursday Example

USO Week / Day Reading/Topic/Film Activities

1

B

Intro to Class/Colonial Period

Text - Chapter 1

BTS - Chapter 1

Discuss papers and films. Choose books and form reading groups. Talk about what history is… oh and discuss reading material assigned.

2

B

Caribbean/Mexico/South America and Exploration-Exploitation

Text - Chapter 2

BTS - Chapter 2

See the film 1492: Conquest of Paradise

Everyone needs to turn in three questions; everyone needs to bring copy of film notes and movie notes to class please. Will break down discussion leaders.

3

B,C

Colonial Rules and Race

Text -Chapter 3

BTS -Chapter 3

See the film Aguirre, the Wrath of God

Guest Speaker on Brazil and Indigenous Population

Discuss reading material and answer essay question

Discussion leaders - Thursday Last 45 minutes

4

A,B,

Religion and Women

Text - Chapter 12

BTS - Chapter 4

See the film I, the Worst of All

Tuesday Discussion on reading text

Discussion leaders - Thursday Last 45 minutes

5

A,B,

Religion and Conquest

Text - Chapter 5

BTS - Chapter 5

See the film The Mission

Tuesday Discussion on reading text

Discussion leaders - Thursday last 45 minutes

O

Depending on their novel could be A,B,C

No reading this week

Reading Groups Meet

Slides

Reading Groups meet on Thursday

7

B,C

Independence and Politics

Rise of the Caudillo

Text - Chapter 4

BTS - Chapter 6

See the film - Camilia

Tuesday Discussion on reading text and answer essay question

Discussion leaders - Thursday last 45 minutes

8

A,B,C

 

Slavery and the economy

Text - Chapter 6

BTS - Chapter 7

See the film - The Last Supper

Tuesday Discussion on reading text

Discussion leaders - Thursday first 45 minutes

Last half of class used for research

9

Depending on their novel could be A,B, C

Changing roles of women and politics

Text - Chapter 10

BTS - Chapter 8

See the film - Lucia

Tuesday Reading Groups Meet

Discussion leaders - Thursday last 45 minutes

10

A,B,C

Economic Development

Urban and rural lives

Text - Chapter 8

BTS - Chapter 9

See the film - Gabriela

Tuesday Discussion on reading text and answers to essay questions

Discussion leaders - Thursday last 45 minutes

11

A,B,C

Class/ Nationalism

Text - Chapter 9

BTS - Chapter 10

See film - Like Water for Chocolate

Tuesday Discussion of text

Thursday Guest Speaker first half of class

Discussion leaders - Thursday last 45 minutes

12

Depending on their novel could be A,B,C

  No film this week

Tuesday - Research Day

Thursday Reading Groups Meet

13

A,B,C

Foreign Influences and the Latin America Intellectual

Text - Chapter 7

BTS - Chapter 11

See film - Miss Mary

Tuesday Discussion of reading text

Discussion leaders - Thursday last 45 minutes

14

B,C

Modern Latin America and new political waves

Text - Chapter 11

BTS - Chapter 11

See film - Official Story

Tuesday Discussion of reading material and article

Discussion leaders - Thursday last 45 minutes

BOOK REVIEW DUE THURSDAY

15

B,C

Children/Poverty

And Violence

Text - Chapter 14

BTS - Chapter 12

See film in class on CIA and Latin America - Tuesday- Show film and begin discussion

Discussion Leaders - first 45 minutes on film

Last half of class for research

 

Finals Week - Research Paper Due during Scheduled Final