Approved by University Studies Sub-Committee.   A2C2 action pending.

University Studies Course Approval Application

 

Department/Program: History

 

Course Number: 123 Number of Credits: 3

 

Course Title: East Asian Civilization

 

Catalog Description:

A survey of China and Japan from the pre-modern era to the present which emphasizes their traditional institutions and values and their responses to Western Imperialism, Japan’s Meiji Restoration and expansionism, traditional China�s collapse and revolutionary movements, World War II, China’s Communist reconstruction and post-Communist economy, and Japan’s reemergence as a world power.

 

 

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2: Yes.

 

 

This is a new course proposal: No.

 

 

Department Contact Person:

Alex Yard

Ayard@winona.edu

 

History 123: East Asian Civilization

 

University Studies Category: Unity and Diversity: Global Perspectives.

The program requires courses in this category to address at least two of the specified outcomes.

 

University Studies Outcome A:

To promote students’ abilities to understand the role of the world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future.

The department believes that History 123: East Asian Civilization will make a significant contribution to the Global Perspectives category of University Studies by introducing students to cultures that differ radically from their own. That in itself will bring students closer to any reasonable definition of "world citizen." Students will also have the opportunity to identify those cultural themes and historical developments in Asia that are similar to their own, another essential element of "world citizenship." Moreover, the course improves students� understanding of the past conflicts between European and East Asian societies and among East Asian societies, highlighting how local conflicts can have genuinely global consequences.

The department also believes that understanding the principle East Asian cultural traditions and external relations will begin to prepare students to work with people drawn from diverse traditions in a shrinking world. This, it seems to us in the History Department, is a critical element of "world citizenship."

History 123: East Asian Civilization promotes these outcomes in several ways. The course introduces students to selected pre-modern Chinese and Japanese traditions and the modern history of these two empires. Students, for example, will read and discuss extracts of texts drawn from the China�s Confucian tradition as well as from its still more authoritarian and militaristic rivals. Students will also read significant expressions of feudal Japan’s samurai ethic. Moreover, the course examines in some detail the impact on modern East Asia of nationalism, colonialism, militant imperialism, and Marxism-Leninism. In the process, the course enables students to better understand the cultural diversity � as well as cultural commonality � of the world. Students then better prepared to understand what in their own culture is local and particular and what is not.

The course also explores the relationship between the domestic affairs of nation states (including the U.S. and the European powers active in East Asia) and their foreign policies, a dimension of the world system that its citizens need to understand. The course, for example, dedicates time to exploring the internal sources of Europe�s intrusion into East Asian affairs. The course�s examination of 20th-century Japanese imperial in particular emphasizes the domestic economic and political sources of its colonial rampage in Korea, Manchuria, China, and Southeast Asia. The course also discusses the curious U.S. attempt to remake Japan in the image of New Deal-era dreams in the years immediately following World War II. As such, it emphasizes the global implications of domestic political and economic systems, as well as of the political and economic choices made by both subjects and citizens.

The course attempts to accomplish this through lectures, readings (in both historical literature and translated documents drawn from East Asian cultures), class discussions using both small-group and full-class formats, essay exams, and an essay on a choice of assigned topics.

 

University Studies Outcome B:

To promote students’ abilities to describe and analyze social, economic, political, spiritual or environmental elements that influence the relations between living beings and their environments or between societies.

The department believes that History 123 will enable students to understand relations among societies by exploring both developments within East Asia and developments in East Asia’s relations with European powers and the United States.

The course requires students to explore the longstanding relationship between China and Japan. The course, for example, discusses the cultural, economic and political sources of Imperial China’s "middle kingdom" assumption that other states, Japan included, must acknowledge China’s superiority as a prerequisite for the establishment of trade, diplomatic and/or military relations. The course also examines the sources of Japan’s creative adaptation of Chinese culture.

Students will also have a chance to describe and analyze China’s relations with a wide range of other societies. History 123, for example, requires students to explore the sources of China’s unhappy relations and conflicts with the principle European powers of the 18th and 19th centuries. It also requires students to consider China’s relations with Japan and the United States in the 20th century. Students will have an opportunity to examine how conflicts emerged and the long-term legacy of European colonialism.

The course attempts to accomplish this through lectures, readings (in both historical literature and translated documents drawn from East Asian cultures), class discussions using both small-group and full-class formats, written tests, and an essay on a choice of assigned topics.

 

University Studies Outcome C:

To promote students’ abilities to identify and analyze specific global issues, illustrating the social, economic, political, spiritual or environmental differences that may affect their resolution.

History 123 introduces students to the global issue imperial expansionism � cultural, political, and economic - drawn form the past rather than from the contemporary world. Students will be invited to compare traditional China’s imperial system (and its emphasis on cultural colonization) with Japan’s 19th- and 20th-century military-economic empire. The course will also invite students to compare both with European colonial systems of the modern era and the expansionism of the United States. In each case, the course will improve student’s understanding of how local conditions shape the particular forms of the worldwide curse of restlessly expanding nation states.

The course attempts to accomplish this through lectures, readings (in both historical literature and translated documents drawn from East Asian cultures), class discussions using both small-group and full-class formats, written tests, and an essay on a choice of assigned topics.

 

 

Representative Syllabus

WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

 

History 123 -- East Asian Civilization � 3 Semester Credits

 

University Studies Program Course

Unity and Diversity:

Global Perspectives

Semester and Year Prof. Alexander Yard

Class Meeting times and place

History 123 is a one-semester course meant to survey the entire sweep of East Asian Civilization. It is an impossible task, and the course will be far more narrowly focused than the course title might imply. In geo-political terms, the course will concentrate on China and Japan, and in temporal terms, it will concentrate largely on the modern era. Moreover, as a thematic, guiding thread you could concentrate on how the combination of traditional beliefs and institutions endured their collision with Western expansionism to help shape modern East Asia.

The course will feature lectures, but it will also involve small group and class discussions. If you are not willing and ready to read assignments in advance of the class sessions and to discuss them, you should drop the course. Each student will take a map test, write a five- to ten-page paper on an assigned topic and complete two written examinations. You will find attached to this syllabus study guides for the map test and written examinations and an assignment sheet for the paper.

 

University Studies Program Notes

This course meets the requirements as a Global Perspectives course within the Unity and Diversity category of the University Studies Program. As such, this course includes requirements and learning activities that are designed:

 

A To promote students’ abilities to understand the role of the world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future.

This course will do this by using lectures, readings, and discussions to introduce you to the cultural traditions of China and Japan, emphasizing both the how they differ from western traditions and what they have in common with western traditions. By so doing, the course will prepare you to better live in the shrinking world that you are inheriting. The course will also improve your understanding of past conflicts between East Asian and the European powers and the U.S. and conflicts within East Asia. In the process, the course will highlight how the interests and ambition of one nation (and its citizens or subjects) can have global consequences. The course, in other words, will imply that you, a citizen of one nation state, already are a "global citizen" whose interests and decisions will have far reaching consequences.

 

B: To promote students abilities to describe and analyze social, economic, political, spiritual or environmental elements that influence the relations between living beings and their environments or between societies.

The course addresses this University Studies outcome by focusing on the elements that influence relations between societies in the past. The course, for example, will explore the sources of late pre-modern China�s system of foreign relations called the "Tribute System." The course will also explore what shaped the remarkably unhappy relations between imperialistic western nation states and East Asia from the late 18th century to through the 20th century. The course will also explore the sources of Japan’s changing relations with China, from respecting and fearing China in the 18th century to invading and conquering huge parts of it in the 20th century.

 

C: To promote students’ abilities to identify and analyze specific global issues, illustrating the social, economic, political, spiritual or environmental differences that may affect their resolution.

The course addresses this outcome as it focuses in the global issue of imperialistic expansionism, making you more aware of cultural and economic as well as political expansionism. Moreover, the course will encourage you to compare differing forms of expansionism (Qing Dynasty China�s empire with 20th-century Japan’s "co-prosperity sphere," for example). In addition, it will highlight and seek to explain Japan’s and China’s different responses to the expansion of European and U.S. power into East Asian. While examining how both Japan and China reacted to the conclusion of WW II, the course will continue to explore the sources of the divergent Japanese and Chinese responses to this global issue and its resolution.

I plan to use the following formula to calculate final grades:

Map Quiz: 10% Midterm Exam: 25%

Paper: 25% Final Exam: 30%

Discussion 10%

Required Books

The following books should be available at the campus bookstore:

Conrad Schirokauer, Modern China and Japan, A Brief History

World Cultures Resources Series, ed. by Lynn H. Nelson and Steven K Drummond, Readings for Hist 123: East Asian Civilization

Masao Miyoshi, As We Saw Them, The First Japanese Embassy to the

United States

Richard Evans, Deng Xiaoping and the Making of Modern China

Chie Nakane, Japanese Society

In addition the instructor will make available other readings and a series of articles drawn from recent issues of The Japan Times and Beijing Review concerning contemporary Japanese and Chinese culture and relations.

 

 

Course Schedule

 

[Note: below, the letters MCJ refer to Schirokauer, MODERN CHINA AND JAPAN, and RDGs refers to READINGS FOR HIST 123, EAST ASIAN CIVILIZATION]

Topic 1: Course Introduction, Imperial China -- MCJ, ch. 1; RDGs, 1-70 (USO A) Map Quiz

Topic 2: Feudal Japan in the Tokugawa Era -- MCJ, chs. 2; RDGs, 95-108; Handout (USO A)

Topic 3: Traditional East Asia and the World: China�s Tribute System--MCJ, ch. 3; RDGs, 103-128. (USO B and C)

Topic 4: The Western Onslaught: China -- MCJ, ch. 4; RDGs, 71-94; Handout. (USO A, B, and C)

Topic 5: The Western Onslaught: Japan -- MCJ, ch. 5; Miyoshi, AS WE SAW THEM, all (USO A, B, and C)

Topic 6: Japan�s Meiji Revolution and Reconstruction � MCJ, ch. 6; handout. (USO B and C)

Midterm Exam

Topic 7: China�s Traditionalist Reformers -- MCJ, ch. 7; RDGs, 129-140 (USO B and C)

Topic 8: China�s Aborted Revolution, and Political Disintegration - MCJ, ch. 8; RDGs, 141-147, Handout. (USO B and C)

Topic 9: Modernizing Japan in Crisis-- MCJ, ch. 9; Handout (USO A, B and C)

Topic 10: Asia�s World War � MCJ, ch. 10; RDGs 147-163 (USO B and C)

Topic 11: Occupied Japan -- MCJ, ch. 11 pt. 1; Handout (USO A, B and C)

Topic 12: Revolutionary China � MJC, ch 11 pt. 2; Deng Xiaoping, pp. 1-116 (USO B and C)

Paper Due

Topic 13: Toward Contemporary Japan -- MCJ, ch 12; Nakane, Japanese Society, all; Rdgs. 163-206 (USO A)

Topic 14: Toward Contemporary China -- MCJ, ch. 13; Evans, Deng Xiaoping, pp. 116-329; (USO A)

Topic 15 Contemporary East Asian Relations -- extracts from Japan Times and Beijing Review (USO B and C)

Final Exam