Approved by Universitsy Studies Sub-committee.  A2C2 action pending.

University Studies Course Approval

 

Department or Program: History

Course Numbers: History 125

Semester Hours: 3

Frequency of Offering:

Course Title: Classical History

Catalog Description:

The history of Greece from Homeric time of Plato to the Roman Republic. Grade only.

This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2:

YES

This is a new course proposal:

NO

University Studies Category

Democratic Institutions

Department Contact Person:

Alex Yard

Ayard@winona.edu

 

Rationale:

 

USP Democratic Institutions Objective A:

The University Studies program requires that courses in Democratic Institutions promote students’ ability to understand principles upon which democratic governments are based.

History 125 introduces students to the principles underlying the worlds’ first democracy. Classical Athens (at least for its citizens) was a "pure" democracy. Students will study the "Lot"—the truly democratic method of electing a government that was the essence of Greek democracy. Also, students will understand the necessity of citizens’ total involvement in that society. As Pericles stated about Athenian democracy: "A person who is not involved in the Polis is useless." What better way to promote the idea of citizenship!

This course attempts to promote students’ ability to understand principles upon which democratic governments are based by means of lectures, readings of both primary documents and historical literature, class discussions (both small-group and full-class discussion), quizzes, hour-long tests, and writing assignments.

 

USP Democratic Institutions Objective B:

The University Studies program requires that courses in Democratic Institutions promote students’ ability to understand the problems of democracy and the conditions that favor or disfavor it.

History 125 will enable students to see that Athens instituted a democracy because of its historical perspective and political role in the larger world picture. Students will see that "Middle Class Values" and emphasis upon trade enabled Athens to benefit economically and politically from democracy. When civil war tore Greece apart and pessimism set in democracy was destroyed. Due to the many problems of the Athenian Polis, democracy was eventually destroyed.

Students should discover how fragile democracy is.

This course attempts to promote students’ ability to understand the problems of democracy and the conditions that favor or disfavor it by means of lectures, readings of both primary documents and historical literature, class discussion (both small-group and full-class discussion), quizzes, hour-long exams, and writing assignments.

 

USP Democratic Institutions Objective C:

The University Studies program requires that courses in Democratic Institutions promote students’ ability to identify, state, and justify value judgments related to democratic institutions.

The Greeks and later scholars spent much time making value judgments of Greek democracy. Students will read arguments for and against Athenian democracy by such thinkers as Pericles, Socrates, and Aristotle. Many commentators on Athenian democracy—both contemporary and later—will be closely examined and criticized in this course. Feminists, Marxists, Liberals, and Conservatives have all evaluated Greek democracy.

This course attempts to promote students’ ability to identify, state, and justify value judgments related to democratic institutions by means of lectures, readings of both primary documents and historical literature, class discussion (both small-group and full-class discussion), quizzes, hour-long exams, and writing assignments.

 

USP Democratic Institutions Objective D:

The University Studies program requires that courses in Democratic Institutions promote students’ ability to understand the nature of non-democratic institutions.

Some of this course is devoted to non-democratic institutions. Students will study the early Athenian Polis—an oligarchic government. Sparta and other Greek city states were ruled by oligarchs, tyrants, and kings. After the fall of the Polis and rise to power of Macedon, empires arose. Students will compare these other political systems with Greek democracy.

This course attempts to promote students ability to understand the nature of non-democratic institutions by means of lectures, readings of both primary documents and historical literature, class discussion (both small group and full-class discussion), quizzes, hour-long exams, and writing assignments.

 

USP Democratic Institutions Objective E:

The University Studies program requires that courses in Democratic Institutions promote students’ ability to understand the implications of taking responsibility for the consequences of their own actions for democratic institutions.

This topic will be examined closely in History 125. The case of Socrates is right to the heart of this requirement. Students will study the famous case of Socrates and the reasons that Socrates was killed by democratic Athens. Also, students will examine other lesser known Athenians, in civil and criminal cases. Many words were spoken in Classical Athens and other city states on the virtues and vices of democracy.. The Funeral Oration of Pericles and the Melian Dialogue by Thucydides discussed the idea of taking responsibility for the consequences of their own actions. Students will analyze these documents.

This course attempts to promote students ability to understand the implications of taking responsibility for the consequences of their own actions for democratic institutions by means of lectures, small group and full-class discussions, quizzes, hour-long exams, and writing assignments.

 

USP Democratic Institutions Objective F:

The University Studies program requires that courses in Democratic Institutions promote students’ ability to understand the relations of equal rights to democratic institutions.

Equal rights were critical to the stability and maintenance of Greek democratic institutions. In Athens when a citizen was deprived of his rights disaster could occur for the Polis. Students will examined the example of "ostracism" in Athens. Ostracism was instituted to drive out any politician who threatened a citizens’ equal rights. Also, the Athenians stressed the responsibility for all when equal rights were granted. Students will also study the non-equal rights of non-citizens—women, slaves, and aliens.

This course attempts to promote students ability to understand the relations of equal rights to democratic institutions by means of lectures, small group and full –class discussions, quizzes, hour-long exams, and writing assignments.

 

USP Democratic Institutions Objective G:

The University Studies program requires that courses in Democratic Institutions promote students’ ability to understand the need to exercise responsibility for the expression of their ideas.

By studying Socrates’ defense of his actions in the Apology and Crito, students will be able to see the importance of exercising responsibility in democratic institutions. This course will use the case of Socrates to discuss problems and actions in the modern world. Would we tolerate or incarcerate a Socrates? How much criticism of our system is allowed?

This course attempts to promote students’ ability to understand the need to exercise responsibility for the expression of their ideas by means of lectures, small group and full-class discussions, quizzes, hour-long exams, and writing assignments.

 

Representative Syllabus for History 125: Classical History

Appended to University Studies Proposal

February 2001

 History 125: Classical History

History 125 surveys the history of Classical Greece from the Mycenaean age to the time of Alexander the Great. The course will concentrate on the rise and fall of Athenian democracy from 600-350 BC.. Students will study and evaluate the values—virtues and defects—of Greek democracy. Hopefully, this study of democratic and non-democratic institutions in the Greek world will force and enable students to understand the values—virtues and defects of contemporary democratic systems.

Most of this course will be driven by class discussion. There will usually be a written quiz on days when the class has discussion. All quizzes as well as all exams will be essay. The quiz will be on the material to be discussed that day.

The following are the required books for this class:

The Penguin History of Greece

The Ancient World

Seven Famous Greek Plays

The Bacchae

The Trial and Death of Socrates

Murder of Herodes

Evaluations:

Your grade will be based on four in-class essay exams, numerous essay quizzes, and participation. The following formula will determine your final grade:

4 Exams 50%

Quizzes 35%

Reports 5%

Class Participation 10%

 

University Studies Program Note to Students

This course is included in the Democratic Institutions category of the University Studies Program. As such it addresses the following objectives required of all courses in the Democratic Institutions category.

a. To Understand the principles upon which democratic governments are based;

b. To understand the problems of democracy and the conditions that favor or disfavor it;

c. To identify, state, and justify value judgments related to democratic institutions;

d. To understand the nature of non-democratic institutions;

e. To understand the implications of taking responsibility for the consequences of their own actions, for democratic institutions;

f. To understand the relation of equal rights to democratic institutions;

g. To understand the need to exercise responsibility for the expression of their ideas.

 

The following course schedule uses the letters USOa (meaning University Studies Objective a), USOb (meaning University Studies Objective b), USOc (meaning University Studies Objective c), USOd (meaning University Studies Objective d), USOe (meaning University Studies Objective e), USOf (meaning University Studies Objective f), USOg (meaning University Studies Objective g) to indicate where the course will address each of these University Studies objectives.

 

 

Course Schedule:

Topic 1: Introduction                Minoan and Myceanaean Background (USO d)

Topic 2: Values of Early Greece Ancient World, 1-46; Homer, Iliad; Odyssey (USOd) Hesiod,
                                                        Theogony (handout) (USOd)

Topic 3:    Tyranny and Compassion Prometheus Bound (Paper) USOd,g) Examination 1

Topic 4: Classical Greek Sparta (USOd), Others (USOd)  Non-Democratic Institutions

Topic 5: Athenian Democracy         Solon to Pericles (USOa,b)

       Voting (USOf,g)

       Peloponnesian War (USOb,c)

       Ancient World (Pericles 
       Funeral Oration) (USOa-g)

       Ancient World (Melian 
       Dialogue) (USOd,e,g)

        Examination 2

Topic 6: Values of Athenian democracy Oedipus the King (USOe)

Shown through plays Antigone (USOe,g)

Medea (USOc)

The Baccchae (USOb,f)

Examination 3

Topic 7: Problems of Greek democracy Plato, Euthythro (USOa-g)

Shown through philosophy Plato, Apology (USOa-g)

Plato, Crito (USOa-g)

Plato, Phaedo (USOa-g)

Ancient World, Aristotle (USOa-g)

Topic 8: Evaluation of Athens shown Murder of Herodes (USOc,f,g)

Through court trials

Topic 9: Overview of Greek Democracy (USOa,b,c,f,g)

Final Examination