Approved by University Studies Sub-committee.  A2C2 action pending.

 

University Studies Course Approval

Department or Program     Music
Course Number     113
Semester Hours    3
Frequency of Offering     Spring Semester, alternating years
Course Title     Women in Music

This is an existing course    
Previously approved by A2C2     Yes

This is a new course proposal     No

Department Contact Person for this course:
Dr. Paul Vance, Associate Professor of Music
Email: pvance@winona.edu

A General Education/University Studies Arts & Sciences Course (Humanities)

Catalog Description
An overview of the contributions made by women in creating, performing, teaching, and commissioning music. The course will examine the role of women in Western art and popular music, and in the music of non-Western cultures. Offered alternating spring semesters.

General Course Information
Despite the numerous contributions of women to the art of music from the beginning of time, most text books used in music history sequences and introductory courses in music at the college level devote little time and space to female musicians. This course is designed to provide an overview of these contributions and to identify some of the most outstanding women and examine their work in some detail.

Rationale
USP Course Objective #1. Identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of music:
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and understand specific elements of musical expression as they pertain to women composers and performers. This will be accomplished by listening to and discussing works composed by women or for women performers.

USP Course Objective #2 Understand how historical context, cultural values and gender roles influenced perceptions and interpretations:
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to understand how gender, historical context, and cultural values influence perceptions and interpretations of music. These issues will be addressed in lecture, readings, listening assignments, creative activity (lyric composition), and by guest lecturers.

USP Course Objective #3. Understand the role of critical analysis in the interpretation and evaluation of music in the human experience:
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to understand the role of critical analysis in interpreting and evaluating musical expressions of human experience. This will accomplished by means of listening assigments, group discussions, and attendance at concerts of music by women composers.


COURSE SYLLABUS
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS
Department of Music
WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

Course Number: MUS 113     Course Title: Women in Music
Number of Credits: 3 s.h.     Grading: Letter grade only.
Prerequisites: None

Course Applies to: University Studies  Arts & Sciences (Humanities)

Catalog Description
An overview of the contributions made by women in creating, performing, teaching, and commissioning music. The course will examine the role of women in Western art and popular music, and in the music of non-Western cultures. Offered alternating spring semesters.

This course is designed as a University Studies Course under the classification of Humanities.

USP Course Objectives (University Studies Criteria that promote students' abilities to):

USP Course Objective #1. Identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of music:

USP Course Objective #2. Understand how historical context, cultural values and gender roles influenced perceptions and interpretations:

USP Course Objective #3. Understand the role of critical analysis in the interpretation and evaluation of music in the human experience:

Major Objectives:
After completion of this course, the student will:
#1. Be able to identify and understand elements of musical creative and recreative activity as it relates to female musicians. (USP Objectives #1 & 2)

#2. Be able to understand ways in which gender influences musical perceptions and interpretations as they relate to performers and to listeners. (USP Objectives #1 2, & 3)

#3. Be able to understand the role of gender and cultural analysis in interpreting and evaluating expressions of human experience. (USP Objectives #2 & 3)

#4. Be able to describe the role of women in "art" music from the Middle Ages to the present day. (USP Objectives #2)

#5. Be able to describe the contributions of women in contemporary popular music. (USP Objectives #2 & 3)

#6. Be able to identify representative works written by women of specifically for women performers. (USP Objectives #1 & 3)

Textbooks:
1.    Neuls-Bates, Carol, editor. Women in Music: An Anthology of Source Readings from the Middle Ages to the Present. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1997.
2.    Bowers, Jane and Judith Tick. Women Making Music: The Western Art Tradition, 1150-1950. Urbana: The University of Illinois Press, 1986.
3.    O'Brien, Lucy. She-Bop: The Definitive History of Women in Rock, Pop, and Soul. New York: Penguin Books, 1999.

Assignments and Assessments:
1) Listening Assignments
Each student will be required to do four listening assignments during the semester and must submit a written critique of the music assigned.

2) Lyric Writing
Each student will compose a set of lyrics to a pre-existing popular tune and chord structure. This may be done individually or as part of a small group project. The purpose of this assignment is to give the student an idea of the creative process, and to observe the ways in which gender can influence artistic expression.

3) Concert Attendance
Each student will be required to attend one live performance which features a female musician, or at least one large work by a female composer. The concert must be approved by the instructor.

4) Examinations
Each student will be required to take the course's four written tests.

Basic Instructional Plan and Teaching Methods Utilized:
Lecture
Group Work
Guest Speakers
Videos
Audio Recordings
Internet Work (song structures on-line for lyric writing; listening assignments)
Individual Work

The individual instructor will determine Grading and Grading Scale.