Approved by Faculty Senate December 2, 2002

Syllabus:   MUS 203, Theory III

Dr. James S. Hoch

MWF 9:00 - 9:50

T - Th 8:30 - 9:20

 

Office phone: 457-5253

Office Hour: posted on door

  TEXTS:

Benward & White. Music: In Theory and Practice Vol. II        Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill , 1997. 6th Ed.

Ottman, Robert.  Music for Sight Singing, 5th ed.  Prentice-Hall.

SOFTWARE:

   notation program:    Print Music ---provided by WSU.  Note:   students may also use their own copy of Finale if they own it.

Ear Training: Auralia  (Mac or PC)

 

 

This course is designed as a University Studies Course in the Critical Analysis category under Unity and Diversity.  The course requires students to analyze basic musical forms and structures, solve problems in identifying harmonic structures, identify sound arguments regarding musical styles and forms and compositional devices.

 

 

Theory III includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:

 

a.   Evaluate the validity and reliability of information

Students engage in classroom activities and discussions in which they evaluate peer assignments for errors in harmonic writing and analysis.  They examine notated examples to see if they accurately represent the sound models.  Students also examine examples of various simple and complex forms (i.e. binary, ternary or theme and variations) and compare and critique information, commentary and explanations provided in the text and other sources with their own analysis of the structure.

 

b.  analyze modes of thought, expressive works, arguments, explanations or theories,

Daily course work examines various expressive works as well as differing explanations and theories of analysis for alternate approaches to the work.   For example, students “realize” figured bass, analyzing the typical stylistic ideas and understandings for that particular period to recreate the expressive work.  Another activity involves analyzing the harmonic progressions as well as the overall form of existing compositions from various composers.  Students analyze the arguments presented in the text and other sources regarding specific harmonic and formal structures of the music based on their knowledge of harmony and style.

 

c.  recognize possible inadequacies or biases in the evidence given to support arguments or conclusions

Students discuss in class various analyses of given works, harmonic progressions, polyphonic textures, and structural design examining them for errors and inadequacies.  Students display their own harmonic analyses in class for peer review.  The class examines student work for weaknesses in conclusions.  Students discuss structural analyses given by the text and others for theoretical stance.

 

d.  advance and support claims.

Students write papers documenting their arguments and ideas concerning the musical structures and styles.  These papers accompany class projects for different formal structures (ternary composition and theme & variations). They provide detailed evidence supporting their approach to the composition, their analysis of the form, and use of various harmonic structures.

 

 

OBJECTIVES:

1. to review material from first year Theory

2. to learn Modulation, Borrowed Chords, Neopolitan 6ths, and Augmented sixth and analyze representative works from the literature for these chord structures. (USP  rationale -a) Evaluate the validity and reliability of information

3. to increase one's aural skills including intervals, melodic dictation, rhythmic dictation, harmonic  dictation, and error detection. (USP   rationale -a) Evaluate the validity and reliability of information)

4. to compose works demonstrating an understanding of binary/ternary, invention, and variation forms. (USP  rationale- d.  advance and support claims.

5. to analyze works in the binary, ternary, variation, invention and fugue forms. (USP- b.  analyze modes of thought, expressive works, arguments, explanations or theories;   c.  recognize possible inadequacies or biases in the evidence given to support arguments or conclusions;  d.  advance and support claims.

 

Student Expectations:

1. COME TO CLASS!!

2. COME TO CLASS ON TIME!!!

3. TURN IN WORK WHEN SCHEDULED. All homework assignments must be turned in during class.  Late assignments will not be accepted (unless extremely extenuating circumstances).

4. Exams must be taken when scheduled. In the event you are unable to take an exam, the instructor must be notified prior to the exam. (I have an answering machine in my office...see above).

5. All homework is to be done in pencil. The composition assignments are to be done on the computer using Print Music or Finale.

6. All compositions must be uploaded to Class File on the server before the start of the class they are due.  For example, if your composition is due on a Monday your composition must be in the file before the start of class on the Monday so that I may download it in class so that we may hear it in class.   Failure to do so will be a loss of one letter grade.

 

 Teacher Expectations

1.  COME TO CLASS!!

2.  COME TO CLASS ON TIME!!!

3.  TURN BACK ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMS IN A TIMELY MANNER.

4.  Be available for extra help.   Please, please come and see me if you need  help!!!

5.  Provide stimulating classes that enrich your appreciation and understanding  of music theory.

6.  Help improve your computer skills as they relate to music.

 

GRADING:

Your final grade is broken down into two main areas:

  Written Theory - 60%

  Ear Training - 40%

Your final grade will be the result of points gathered. The grading rationale is based on the following:

Exams------------------ 20 %

homework--------------10 %

Projects-----------------30 % (Ternary comp, Invention, Variations)

Ear Training -----------40 %

Grades are based on a point basis.

I will have a point spread to display   at mid-semester and right before the final so that you have an idea how you stand with your grade.

Any changes in grade determination will be announced to the class in advance.

FINAL EXAM DATE: TUESDAY, December 11 ---8-10

NOTE: You must pass the Written Theory portion with a C or better average  AND the Ear Training portion with a C or better.  Failure to receive a grade of C or better in either  area will result in a D or F and you can not take the next level of theory. For example:  if your Ear Training grade is only say a 60% ...you will not pass even though your combined Written and Ear may be good enough to equal a C.  You must pass both areas (Written & Ear Training) with a C average (70%).

 

 

POLICY ON LATE ASSIGNMENTS & EXAMS:

All due dates for homework assignments and compositions are firm. No extensions. The only excuses accepted for missing an exam are: death in family with note from the Dean, severe illness with a note from physician, or hospitalization. If you need any help with the material or clarification on assignments, etc., please see me during my office hour or contact me for an appointment. I will be glad to give you the extra time.

 

IMPORTANT!!!!

EAR TRAINING POINTS:

*           practice daily!!!! Plug it into your schedule...REMEMBER IT IS 40% OF YOUR GRADE. Use the software!!!!

*           it can be practiced!!!

*           do not neglect or take for granted.

*           do not skip class

*           make this a priority

*           it is probably the single most important foundation in your career...the ability to use your ear well.

*             homework: transcriptions.  You will have X number of ear training excerpts to download as an QuickTime file and then transcribe...using your ear.

 You must have QuickTime to hear the music examples.

            Go to the Ear Training page  under the Theory web pages on my web page for more details.

*           Ear Training Transcription project.

 

Choose a song that you can transcribe the melody...roughly 16 measures.  It must be something that can not be found written out.

I suggest some easy pop tune off the radio or a commercial jingle.  Turn in transcription on Print Music or Finale.

You are to do two transcriptions.  Due dates:  October 18 and  December 6 exam.

University Studies Course Approval—Critical Analysis

 

 

Department or Program:                         Music

 

Course Number:                         203

 

Number of Credits                         4

 

Course Title:                         Theory III

 

Catalog Description:

Continuation of 4-part writing, tertian structures greater than the octave, secondary dominants, modulation, Augmented 6th.  Forms studied include Binary, Ternary, Variation as well as contrapuntal forms such as Invention and Fugue.   Aural skills further developed.  Prerequisite:  MUS 202.  Must be a declared music major.  Offered yearly.

 

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2:             Yes

 

Department Contact Person for this Course:             James Hoch

 

Email:              jhoch@winona.edu

 

This course is designed to satisfy the requirements in Critical Analysis under the category of Unity and Diversity.

 

Rationale:

 

This course is designed as a University Studies Course in the Critical Analysis category under Unity and Diversity.   The course requires students to analyze basic musical forms and structures, solve problems in identifying harmonic structures, identify sound arguments regarding musical styles and forms and compositional devices.

 

 

Description of the requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:

 

a.   Evaluate the validity and reliability of information

 

Students engage in classroom activities and discussions in which they evaluate peer assignments for errors in harmonic writing and analysis.  They examine notated examples to see if they accurately represent the sound models.  Students also examine examples of various simple and complex forms (i.e. binary, ternary or theme and variations) and compare and critique information, commentary and explanations provided in the text and other sources with their own analysis of the structure.

 

b.  analyze modes of thought, expressive works, arguments, explanations or theories,

 

Daily course work examines various expressive works as well as differing explanations and theories of analysis for alternate approaches to the work.   For example, students “realize” figured bass, analyzing the typical stylistic ideas and understandings for that particular period to recreate the expressive work.  Another activity involves analyzing the harmonic progressions as well as the overall form of existing compositions from various composers.  Students analyze the arguments presented in the text and other sources regarding specific harmonic and formal structures of the music based on their knowledge of harmony and style.

 

c.  recognize possible inadequacies or biases in the evidence given to support arguments or conclusions

 

Students discuss in class various analyses of given works, harmonic progressions, polyphonic textures, and structural design examining them for errors and inadequacies.  Students display their own harmonic analyses in class for peer review.  The class examines student work for weaknesses in conclusions.  Students discuss structural analyses given by the text and others for theoretical stance.

 

d.  advance and support claims.

 

Students write papers documenting their arguments and ideas concerning the musical structures and styles.  These papers accompany class projects for different formal structures (ternary composition and theme & variations). They provide detailed evidence supporting their approach to the composition, their analysis of the form, and use of various harmonic structures.