Approved by Faculty Senate 11/18/02

 

University Studies Approval: Writing Flag, Music Department

Department or Program: Music Department

Course Number: 351

Number of Credits: 3

Course Title: Music of the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Periods

Catalog Description:

Study of the developmentof music from antiquity through c. 1750.   Heritage and central concepts of medieval theory and the rise of individual composers in the Renaissance.  Study of multi-movement forms from cyclic polyphonic mass to opera,  oratorio, and early instrumental genres.

A2C2 approved course- yes

Requested Approval: Writing Flag

Department Contact Person for this course:

Dr. Paul Vance

pvance @ winona.edu

 

This course is designed as a University Studies Course with a Writing Flag. The course objectives and requirements reinforce the outcomes specified by the University Studies Curriculum for the basic skills area of writing. Writing assignments for this course will familiarize the student with music-related research, commentary, and historical perspective.

Description of the Requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to:

a. Practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields:

Students will be required to cite at least five bibliographic sources for their formal paper. Each student will submit a paper topic and outline of their presentation several weeks prior to the due date for the project. The instructor will provide feedback on the merits and viability of the proposed project. Papers will be returned to the student with comments on their work.

b. Understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields:

Students are assigned supplemental reading which will acquaint them with contemporary writing on the topic of musicology. Some of the features of contemporary prose in the field of musicology include commentary on performance practice within a specific historical period: correcting misconceptions of previously accepted historical information: gender-sensitive approaches to musicological perspective.

c. adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields; Students will learn to understand and use terminology
       associated with literature, performance practices, and aesthetics of music of the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Centuries.

d.    make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields:

      Using databases such as RILM, Project Muse, Ingenta, and First Search students will become familiar with some of the most
      accessible and current on-line sources of musicological information.

e. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

      Students are encouraged to buy and use Richard Wingell's Writing About Music: An Introductory Guide. This book provides direction and
      modeling of writing in the field of music.

 

 

Course Syllabus

College of Liberal Arts

Winona State University

Department: Music    

Date of Revision:  August 1, 2002

Course Number: 351

Course Title: Music of the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Period

Number of Credits: 3 s.h.

Frequency of Offering:  Every Spring Term

Prerequisites: MUS 204

Grading: Grade only

Course applies to: Major required

 

This course is designed as a University Studies Course with a Writing Flag. As such, it includes requirements and learning activities that promote the students' abilities to:

a. practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their field;

Students will be required to cite at least five bibliographic sources for their formal paper. Each student will submit a paper topic and outline of their presentation several weeks prior to the due date for the project. The instructor will provide feedback on the merits and viability of the proposed project as well as the mechanics of the writing. Papers will be returned to the student with comments on their writing and content.

b. understand the main features and uses if writing in their field; Students will be assigned supplemental reading which will acquaint them with contemporary writing on the topic of musicology. Some of the features of contemporary prose in the field of musicology include commentary on performance practice within a specific historical period: correcting misconceptions of previously accepted historical information; gender-sensitive approaches to musicological per spective.

c. adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their field; Students will learn to understand and use terminology associated with literature, performance practices, and aesthetics of music of the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Centuries.

d. make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their field; and using databases such as RILM. Project Muse. Ingenta. and First Search students will become familiar with some of the most accessible and current on-line sources of musicological information.

e. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their field. Students are encouraged to buy and use Richard Wingell's Writing About Music: An Introductory Guide. This book provides direction and modeling of writing in the field of music.

 

1. Catalog description:

Study of the development of music from antiquity through c. 1750.  Heritage and central concepts of medieval theory and the rise of individual composers in the Renaissance.  Study of multi-movement forms from cyclic polyphonic mass to opera , oratorio, and early instrumental genres.

2. Statement of the major-or focus and objectives of the course:

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

1. Be able to identify and analyze representative musical forms, styles, performance contexts, performance media, and composers and compositions of western music, and describe the musical traditions, contexts, and characteristics of diverse and representative world cultures. A (1)

2. Be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the interrelationship of music with other art forms and disciplines. A (10)

3. Course outline of the major-or topics and subtonics:

To identify and analyse representative musical forms, styles, and performance media from the Western tradition, from the period covering antiquity thrugh c. 1750. 

To identify representataiave composers and compositions from this period.

To describe musical characteristics of compositons of this period.

4. Basic instructional plan and methods utilized:

Lecture

Group discussion

Video

Audio tapes and compact discs

Experiential activities (e.g., attendance at performances, research papers)

5. Course requirements and means of evaluation:

Three exams, each of which is worth 25% of the final grade. Written exams will include essay questions which will
be evaluated on the basis of content, style, grammar, and clarity of thought.

A formal paper, worth 25 % of the final grade. Topic proposal and writing mechanics and style for both proposal and
final paper are assessed as part of the score.

6 Textbooks:

1. Grout, Donald J. and Claude V. Palisca. A History of Western Music, 5th ed.

New York: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1996

2. Palisca, Claude V., ed. Norton Anthology of Western Music, Vol.1

New York: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1996

7. Course Outline:

 

September 4, 6 & 9: Musical Life and Thought in Ancient Greece and Rome (Chapter 1)

September 11, 13 & 15: Chant and Secular Song in the Middle Ages (Chapter 2)

September 16, 18 &20: The Beginnings of Polyphony and the Music of the Thirteenth Century (Chapter 3)

September 23 & 25: French and Italian Music in the Fourteenth Century (Chapter 4)

September 30, October 2 & 4: England and the Burgundian Lands in the Fifteenth Century (Chapter 5)

October 7: Exam I (Chapters 1 - 5)

October 9: The Age of the Renaissance: The Low Countries (Chapter 6)

October 11 Class will not meet. (Break Day.)

October 14 & 16: Chapter 6, continued.

October 18: New Currents in the Sixteenth Century (Chapter 7)

October 21: Class will not meet.

October 23 & 25: Chapter 7, continued.

October 28 & 30, November 1: Church Music of the Late Renaissance and Reformation (Chapter 8)

November 4: Exam II (Chapters 6 - 8)

November 6 & 9: Music of the Early Baroque Period (Chapter 9)

Paper Topics due. (You are to submit your paper topic in prose form, accompanied
by a brief thesis or explanation of your approach to the topic and an annotated
bibliography at least three sources of information you intend to use in your paper. )

November 11: Class will not meet. (Veteran's Day observed.)

November 13 & 15: Opera and Vocal Music in the Late Seventeenth Century (Chapter 10)

November 18, 20 & 22: Instrumental Music in the Late Baroque Period (Chapter 11)

November 22: Formal Papers due, 10:00 a.m.

December 2: Class will not meet.

December 4 & 6: Chapter 11, continued

December 9, 11 & 13: Music in the Early Eighteenth Century (Chapter 12)

Final Exam: Wednesday, December 18, 8:00 a.m. (Chapters 9-12)

8. Guidelines for Formal Paper:

1. Your formal paper is to discuss a specific composer, piece, or stylistic movement from
the period of time covered in this semester's material (i.e., from antiquity to c. 1750).
The purpose of his project is to encourage students to do critical thinking about the
material introduced this term.

2. You must provide at least five bibliographic citations of sources of information utilized in your paper.

3. If you choose to do a paper on a specific piece of music, it may not be one included in
        the Norton Anthology of Western Music.

4. If you are writing about a composer, you must focus on their work rather than on their
        life. Biographical material may only be used if it relates to the composer's output or
        artistic perspective.

5. Every paper must include some analytical observations relating to musical style (i.e.,
        sound, harmony, melody, rhythm, growth, and text if applicable).

6. Papers must be from 5 to 10 pages in length (excluding footnotes and bibliography).

9.  Grading Scale:

A=92- 100, B=8 1-91, C--70-80, D=65-69