Approved by University Studies Sub-Committee.  A2C2 action pending.

University Studies Course Approval—Contemporary Citizenship

 

Department or Program:                         Music

Course Number:                         298

Number of Credits                         3

Course Title:                         Foundations and Principles of Music Education

 

Catalog Description:

Study of the historical foundations and principles of music education. Examination of selected current topics in music education. Prerequisite: MUS 202 or instructor’s permission. Offered alternate years.

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2:             Yes

 

Department Contact Person for this Course:             Cathy Schmidt

 

Email:              cschmidt@winona.edu

 

This course is designed to satisfy the requirements in Contemporary Citizenship under the category of Unity and Diversity.

 

Rationale:

This course is designed as a University Studies Course in the Contemporary Citizenship category under Unity and Diversity.   Music education has played a significant role in the public schools since 1838 when it was first introduced to the curriculum in the Boston Public Schools.  This course looks at many of the issues relevant to contemporary citizenship such as fair and equitable curriculum, separation of church and state, and the relationship of school curriculum to home and community through an examination of the public school music program, its historical foundations and its principles.

 

MUS 298 provides students with the opportunity to develop the ability to participate as effective citizens in a democratic, multicultural, and global society. The course focuses on developing the skills and knowledge necessary to enhance students' ability to make effective decisions, pursue personal well-being, work collaboratively with others, and/or participate effectively in professional or civic responsibilities.

 

Description of requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:

 

a. use critical thinking to analyze contemporary issues;

In Foundations and Principles of Music Education, students read extensively in the music education field on current issues such as diversity in the music classroom, gender issues, music for children with special needs, theories of talent and aptitude, and music advocacy among others.  The readings, when possible, present multiple perspectives on the topics and students draw from these readings as well as from their own experiences to analyze and discuss the issues.  A significant portion of class time is used for these discussions.  The final exam is in the form of a debate or presentation presenting their analysis and perspective regarding one of the issues considered in class discussion.

 

b. demonstrate effective oral and/or written communication of ideas, informed opinions, and/or values;

Students are required to write a philosophy paper describing their beliefs regarding the values of music education.  They critique and discuss each other’s papers relating materials from class discussion and then have the opportunity to rewrite the papers after working with their peers.  Students also write a 2-4 page paper on a current issue in music education, a number of smaller written analyses of course reading materials, and descriptions of observations made in the schools relating what they have observed to course discussions and readings.  Open class discussion is a significant part of the course, and students are required to do oral presentations on some of the readings as well as an oral presentation or mock debate for their final exam.

 

c. identify, find, and use tools of information science related to contemporary issues;

Students are required to write a 2-4 page research paper on a contemporary issue in music education, including topics such as perceptions of talent and aptitude, diversity issues in music education, the role of the music educator in the community, etc.  Students must seek out appropriate resources for their research using the tools of information science.

 

d. demonstrate the ability to work effectively independently and/or in collaborative problem-solving groups;

Within the assignments for the class, students work both independently and in collaborative problem solving groups.  The advocacy project is one area where students may choose to work with another student or on their own.   Some of the class presentations analyzing reading assignments for varying perspectives on different issues are given as group assignments as well.

 

e. participate actively (e.g., class discussion, volunteerism, etc.) in issues significant to citizenship in contemporary society.

Issues involving our public schools are significant in contemporary society.  Students in this course spend large portions of most class periods discussing issues that pertain to public schools as they relate to the school music program.  They interview teachers and do school observations, analyzing what they experience in relation to contemporary issues related to public schools and the music program.  One of their major projects is in the area of advocacy.  They are required to spend time either volunteering for local school music programs in their advocacy efforts, writing a letter to the school board or to the editor of a local paper, or some other project that involves active involvement with promoting music education in society.

 

 

 

MUSIC 298--FOUNDATIONS AND PRINCIPLES OF MUSIC EDUCATION

 

 

Instructor:            Cathy Schmidt                        Phone:    457-5256                             

Office:              PAC 145                            E-Mail:   cschmidt@winona.edu

 

 

Course Description:

This course is designed to provide the music education student with an overview of the role of music and the music specialist in public education, grades K-12.  The course surveys music education’s historical and philosophical foundations, examines current issues in the field and reviews principles of learning and curriculum as they pertain to the discipline of music.  A major focus of the course will be to prepare students to develop the competencies outlined in the following Minnesota Standards of Effective Teaching Practice for Beginning Teachers:  Standard 1. Subject Matter;  Standard 2. Student Learning;  Standard 3. Diverse Learning;  Standard 6. Communication; Standard 7. Planning Instruction;  Standard 9; Reflection and Professional Development; Standard 10.  Collaboration, Ethics, and Relationships.

 

 

Text:

Mark, Michael L.  Contemporary Music Education, Third Edition.  New York:  Schirmer Books, 1996.

 

Budget for a fairly large amount of copying for articles and readings on reserve at the library.

 

 

This course is designed to satisfy the requirements in Contemporary Citizenship under the category of Unity and Diversity.

 

Description of requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to:

 

a. use critical thinking to analyze contemporary issues:

In Foundations and Principles of Music Education, students read extensively in the music education field on current issues such as diversity in the music classroom, gender issues, music for children with special needs, theories of talent and aptitude, and music advocacy among others.  The readings, when possible, present multiple perspectives on the topics and students draw from these readings as well as from their own experiences to analyze and discuss the issues.  A significant portion of class time is used for these discussions.  The final exam is in the form of a debate or presentation presenting their analysis and perspective regarding one of the issues considered in class discussion.

 

b. demonstrate effective oral and/or written communication of ideas, informed opinions, and/or values;

Students are required to write a philosophy paper describing their beliefs regarding the values of music education.  They critique and discuss each other’s papers relating materials from class discussion and then have the opportunity to rewrite the papers after working with their peers.  Students also write a 2-4 page paper on a current issue in music education, a number of smaller written analyses of course reading materials, and descriptions of observations made in the schools relating what they have observed to course discussions and readings.  Open class discussion is a significant part of the course, and students are required to do oral presentations on some of the readings as well as an oral presentation or mock debate for their final exam.

 

c. identify, find, and use tools of information science related to contemporary issues;

Students are required to write a 2-4 page research paper on a contemporary issue in music education, including topics such as perceptions of talent and aptitude, diversity issues in music education, the role of the music educator in the community, etc.  Students must seek out appropriate resources for their research using the tools of information science.

 

d. demonstrate the ability to work effectively independently and/or in collaborative problem-solving groups;

Within the assignments for the class, students work both independently and in collaborative problem solving groups.  The advocacy project is one area where students may choose to work with another student or on their own.  Some of the class presentations analyzing reading assignments for varying perspectives on different issues are given as group assignments as well.

 

e. participate actively (e.g., class discussion, volunteerism, etc.) in issues significant to citizenship in contemporary society.

Issues involving our public schools are significant in contemporary society.  Students in this course spend large portions of most class periods discussing issues that pertain to public schools as they relate to the school music program.  They interview teachers and do school observations, analyzing what they experience in relation to contemporary issues related to public schools and the music program.  One of their major projects is in the area of advocacy.  They are required to spend time either volunteering for local school music programs in their advocacy efforts, writing a letter to the school board or to the editor of a local paper, or some other project that involves active involvement with promoting music education in society.

 

Course Outcomes:

The student in MUS 298 will:

      Describe the historical foundations for music education and their relevance to music education as practiced in the schools today.  (USP outcome A)

      Articulate a personal philosophy of music education as well as describe various philosophies and rationales used in the past and present to justify music in the schools. (USP outcome A & B)

      Discuss and relate theories of learning and teaching to the cognitive processes and modes of thinking inherent in musical activities, to the various approaches and methodologies practiced currently in music education, and to child development in the area of music.

      Articulate the importance of a child-centered music program that encourages and appreciates multiple perspectives, takes into account the child’s physical, social, emotional, moral and cognitive development in planning instruction, and makes connections with the daily life, past experiences, and communities of the students in the classroom. (USP outcome A, B, D, & E)

      Understand and discuss current issues in public schools and music education such as talent and aptitude, multiculturalism, separation of church and state and music for children with special needs. (USP outcome A, B, C, & E)

      Articulate the importance of continually seeking out professional resources in their development as a learner and teacher, including the professional literature, professional conferences and workshops, and their colleagues.

      Develop an understanding of the relationship the music program has with the school as well as with the community at large. (USP outcome E)

 

Outline of Topics:

I.         Course Introduction and overview of topics

II.  Music education past and present

          A.  Historical foundations

    B.  Symposiums and the contemporary era

    C.  The current role of the music specialist and music program in the schools

III.         Why do we teach music?

      A.  Rationales for music in the schools, past and present

      B.  Developing a philosophy of music education

            C.  The value of music in education:  connection with daily life; power of musical                         communication; inherent power to motivate; creativity and self-expression

         D.  Advocacy and community connections for the music program

IV.         How do we teach music?

      A.   Theories of music teaching and learning

      B.   Cognitive processes and modes of thinking in musical activities

      C.   The child’s musical development in relationship to theories of teaching and learning

V.         What do we teach in music?

      A.   Issues and trends in curriculum development

      B.   Current approaches and methodologies in music education

      C.   Relating the curriculum to students’ home and community.

VI.         Who do we teach in music?

      A.   Theories of talent and aptitude

      B.   Cultural Diversity in the Music Classroom

      C.   Separation of church and state

      D.   Music for children with special needs

      E.   Multicultural issues and the music curriculum

      F.   Issues of Gender

 

 

Projects and Assignments:

bulletExtensive readings from textbook and other related music education journals and publications. (USP outcome A & E) bulletClass presentations, written analysis and class discussion on assigned readings. (USP outcome A, B, D, & E) bulletInterview with a music educator on current issues in education and music education with written analysis. (USP outcome E) bulletReaction paper to one classroom observation relating actual practice to various issues covered in the class. (USP outcome E) bulletOne 2-4 page research paper on a current issue in music education. (USP outcome C) bulletAttendance at a K-12 school music program or concert with a written reflective paper. (USP outcome E) bulletActive music advocacy project.  Students will get involved in advocating for the arts in the Winona area.  Possible projects include a letter to the editor, preparing a presentation to the school board, or volunteering for a referendum. (USP outcome D & E) bulletWritten philosophy paper outlining your beliefs and values related to music education; read and provide feedback provided for other students in the class on their philosophy papers. (USP outcome A & B) bulletFinal Exam:  Participation in a mock debate or school board presentation, supporting one of the positions reflected in the current issues discussed in class. (USP outcome A, B, D, & E)

 

Evaluation Criteria:

 


Final Debate or Presentation:  (50 points)

Preparation for class demonstrated by:

  participation in class discussion, research/presentations/written reviews on

     class topics, and occasional quizzes over assigned readings (50 points)

Interview with written analysis (50 points)

Program Attendance reflective paper (50 points)

Classroom Observation and written

    analyses (50 points)

Philosophy Paper and Feedback (50 points)

Advocacy Project (50 points)

Research paper (50 points)

                                          Total points:  400

 

 

 

Grading Scale:

Grades will be based on a percentage of the total points.

90% (360 points and above)                            = A

80%   -   89% (320-359 points)                     = B

70%   -   79% (280-319 points)                     = C

60%   -   69% (240-279 points)                     = D

59% and below (239 points and below)                   = F