Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

College of Education

Department of Physical Education and Recreation

Program of Recreation, Tourism & Therapeutic Recreation

Course Number: PER 265

Course Name: Leisure in Different Cultures - 3 sh

Please Note: Students can obtain University Studies (Multicultural Perspectives) credit for this course. The following objectives have been set forth for Multicultural Perspectives courses.

(University Studies Multicultural Outcome #1: Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities

of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures).

(University Studies Multicultural Outcome #2: Understand the extent to which cultural differences

influence the interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences).

(University Studies Multicultural Outcome #3: Understand the extent to which cultural differences

influence the interactions between individuals and/or groups)

(University Studies Multicultural Outcome #4: Examine different cultures through their various

expressions)

(University Studies Multicultural Outcome #5: Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone

from a different culture or cultural group).

 

1. Course Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to different cultures through travel study. This course applies only to travel education programs offered through PER and the Adventure Tourism Minor. It is repeatable for credit when students enroll in different travel/study programs leading to the study of different indigenous cultures.

2. Course Objectives

Through active learning experiences students will be able to identify cultural similarities and differences, especially as they pertain to the leisure time of the indigenous peoples of the US and international locations where the Department is involved in the provision of travel/study opportunities. (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #1: Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures).

Through active learning, guided interviewing and self-selected portfolio materials students will be able to critically analyze the host culture’s basic orientation(s) to leisure (e.g.: quality of life orientation, market orientation, human service or holistic orientation, prescriptive orientation, environmentalist orientation).

Throughout their travel study experience, students will be exposed to and/or participate in several leisure activities (including, but not limited to, festivals, adventure recreation, games and sporting events) that are an integral part of the selected indigenous culture. (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #2: Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences).

 

 

Through directed observation and interview technique, students will expand their knowledge of the indigenous people’s use of free time. Further, they will be able to articulate the role that leisure plays in cultural development. (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #3: Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interactions between individuals and/or groups).

Through readings, role modeling, experiential involvement and instructional input, students will be able to follow the proper protocol and etiquette required for access and acceptance in the host culture. (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #5: Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different culture or cultural group).

Through observation and interview techniques students will be able to identify the social problems of the indigenous culture visited. They will explore how issues such as alcohol, drug abuse and unemployment are currently being addressed. Particular attention will be paid to any interventions that involve leisure programming and/or services or particular leisure practices that exacerbate these social problems.

Through observation and interview techniques, students will be able to identify environmental ethics in the host culture’s ceremonies and/or other leisure practices. (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #4: Examine different cultures through their various expressions)

Through readings, first hand observation and personal interaction with members of the indigenous culture studied, students will consider their personally held stereotypes.

Through synthesis of readings and travel experiences students will utilize and strengthen their critical thinking skills.

3. Course Outline

A. Introduction

- Philosophical issues related to leisure and cultural development

- Protocol for interaction with the indigenous group visited (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #5: Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different culture or cultural group).

- Overview of leisure-related cultural similarities and differences between host and home culture (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #5: Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different culture or cultural group).

B. Interaction and Observation

- Interviewing tips and techniques for facilitating successful communication with members of the host culture (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #3: Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interactions between individuals and/or groups)

- Observation and/or inquiry related to indigenous people’s use of free time (e.g.: ceremonies, dances, performances, story telling, etc.) (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #4: Examine different cultures through their various expressions)

- Observation and/or inquiry related to destructive uses of leisure time within the host culture (e.g.: vandalism, excessive drinking, abusive behaviors towards others).

1) Societal impact

2) Contributing cause and effect factors

3) Interventions

-Observation and/or inquiry related to the positive as well as the detrimental aspects of tourism within the host culture. (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #1: Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures).

- Reflection

 

C. Active Learning

-Participation in cultural events and/or leisure-time activities with the indigenous people being studied (e.g.: dances, singing, playing instruments, language, ceremonies and family gatherings).

-First hand exposure to issues related to environmental ethics and leisure participation within the host culture

-Exposure to issues related to adventure-based activities in "sacred" places of the indigenous peoples studied

-Processing and Reflection

4. Methods of Instruction

Readings, observation, discussion, synthesis and the provision of experiential learning will be the primary instructional methods utilized in this class.

5. Course Requirements

Before the Trip:

Your instructor will inform you of the specific reading assignments for this class. Reading assignments will be destination-specific. The readings will prepare students to successfully access the host culture and interact with its people. (University Studies Multicultural Outcome #5: Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different culture or cultural group).

Pre-trip class sessions will be scheduled for all participating students. See instructor for details.

Based upon pre-trip readings and pre-conceived notions, each student will be required to prepare and submit a 3-5 page TYPEWRITTEN paper summarizing his/her anticipated interactions with people from a different culture. (Note: Each student’s pre-conceived notions will be re-addressed following their travels. This retrospective (after trip) paper will fulfill the following:

University Studies Multicultural Outcome #1: Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities

of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures;

University Studies Multicultural Outcome #2: Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence

the interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences;

University Studies Multicultural Outcome #3: Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence

the interactions between individuals and/or groups)

This initial perceptions paper must be submitted to your instructor prior to your departure. Late papers will result in a one letter grade reduction. Papers may be submitted in person or via e-mail or snail mail. Please remember to maintain a copy of any papers/assignments you complete for this class. (With distance learning projects there have been occasional problems with papers lost in both the mail and cyberspace).

From your assigned readings and/or the above course outline, select one area in which you would like to conduct 1:1 interviews and do further cultural comparison investigation. Your instructor will announce the due date to inform him/her of your selected interview topic.

 

During the Trip:

The topic you selected to explore further will be the focus of your cultural comparison/contrast portfolio. In this cultural comparison portfolio you will eventually include: 1) a transcription and summary of your four, topic-specific interviews, 2) supportive cultural comparison materials such as newspaper items, web resources, etc. 3) comparison/contrast notations next to each of your portfolio supportive materials and 4) any other tangible (e.g. brochures/photos) or intangible (e.g. incidental conversation and/or observation notes) non-interview items you find interesting.

During your travels, you must conduct a minimum of four in-depth interviews which are related to your selected cultural topics. At least two of the persons interviewed must be members of the indigenous culture being studied. Anticipate at least 30 minutes for each interview. Introduce yourself truthfully as a student who is needing to do some research for a paper. Indicate how the information will be utilized and gain the interviewees’ permission to share your findings with your other classmates. Use a conversational style when interviewing. It would be helpful to seek permission of the interviewee to either take notes during, or tape record the interview. Immediately following each interview, transcribe your notes or tape recording. The transcription should be detailed and an as- exact -as -possible repeat of your conversation. (Example:

Interviewer: So tell me about how Native American families spend their weekends

Interviewee: Well in my family, we like to have gatherings of the extended family and play games, discuss our history, catch up on our language and what other

members of the community are doing.

Following transcription of your interviews, summarize your findings in a 2-3 page typewritten paper and include the same in your portfolio.

As indicated earlier, in addition to conducting, transcribing and summarizing interviews which are related to one’s selected cultural comparison topic of interest, students are to collect and assemble (into portfolio format), supportive materials such as newspaper or web articles, photos, brochures, observational comments, and comparison and contrast notations pertaining their selected area.

 

 

 

During the Trip (continued)

Meet with your instructor individually and in group to discuss and share your cultural observations, insights, experiences, etc. as related to your selected topical area. (It is likely you will also do this informally with your peers and trip leaders).

After the Trip:

Portfolios and second paper must be RECEIVED by your instructor by the designated due date. There will be a one letter grade reduction for late materials. Students who desire to have their portfolios returned to a non-campus location must include with their portfolio submission, a self-addressed, postage paid, appropriately sized envelope.

For students who live in the Winona area and wish to pick-up their portfolios in person, please be aware that instructors will maintain the portfolios in their offices for a period of six weeks following the end of the semester.

6. Evaluation

Initial impressions 3 - 5 page typewritten paper (based on readings) - 15% of grade

Post trip (retrospective) 3-5 page typewritten paper - 15% of grade

Informed Contribution to 1:1 and group discussions - 20% of grade

Portfolio presentation and interviews - 50% of grade

-transcribed interviews

-summary of interview findings

-supportive documentation

-notations throughout

*Papers and projects will be graded upon: apparent depth of research, indication of thought and synthesis, and presentation (flow, grammar, appearance, detail and inclusion of clear comparison and contrast information in portfolio).

*Note - The portfolio project is the capstone project in this class. It meets the following University Studies objectives for this course:

(University Studies Multicultural Outcome #1: Demonstrate knowledge of diverse

patterns and similarities of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures).

(University Studies Multicultural Outcome #2: Understand the extent to which cultural differences

influence the interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences).

(University Studies Multicultural Outcome #3: Understand the extent to which cultural differences

influence the interactions between individuals and/or groups)

(University Studies Multicultural Outcome #4: Examine different cultures through their various

expressions)

7. Text and References

The subject matter will differ somewhat for each course and each student. General references available to the student will include but not be limited to:

Australian InFo International . (1998). Australian Aboriginal Culture.

Commonwealth of Australia

Bruchac, J., and Caduto, M. (1988). Keepers of the Earth. Fulcrum Press

Cassidy, James J. (1995). "Through Indian Eyes" Readers Digest.

Dorsey, George A. (1997). The Pawnee Mythology. Bison Book Press

Goodman, Ronald. (1992). Lakota Star Knowledge. Sinte Gleska University

Guie, Heister D. (1990). Coyote Stories. Mourning Dove Press.

Hassrick, Royal B. (1960). The Sioux. Oklahoma University Press.

Murie, James R. (1984). Ceremonies of the Pawnee. University of Nebraska

Press

Pieper, Josef (1947). Leisure: The Basis of Culture. Meridian Books.

Pilger, John. (1991). A Secret Country: Hidden Australia. Random House.

Sandoz, Mari (1953). Cheyenne Autumn. University of Nebraska Press.

Silko, Leslie M. (1981). Story Teller. Arcade Press

Smelt, Roslyn (1998). Cultures of the World: New Zealand. Marshall Cavendish,

NY

Stafford, D. (2000). Introducing Maori Culture. Reed Books

Thomas, W.E. Some Myths and Legends of the Australian Aborigines.

http://www.sacred-texts.com/aus/smalaa.htm

Vijeya and Sudran. (1991) Cultures of the World: Australia. Marshall Cavendish,

NY.

Walker, James R. (1991). Lakota Belief and Ritual. University of Nebraska Press