Approved by Faculty Senate

1. Outcomes for General Physics  202

Course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to…

  1. Understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural sciences;

General Physics 201and 202 introduce the students to the fundamental methods of how scientist approach and solve problems in the natural science. The course starts with the simplest concepts and develop models to explain the motion of objects. As the students’ skills and knowledge expand, the models become more complex. Students are introduced to the laws of physics and some of the laboratory assignments are designed for students to verify these laws. Misconceptions that students have about the topics are challenged and demonstration experiments and hand-on laboratory exercise help the students develop a new framework based on mathematical equations. A historical perspective of the scientists and the laws of physics that they developed are also given.

(b) Apply those methods to solve problems that arise in the natural sciences

Each chapter introduces a few new concepts. Students are given problem assignments to practice applying the concepts. Quizzes, hour exams, and laboratory assignments are given and graded to test the students’ understanding of the concepts. The goal of this procedure is to develop in the student a problem solving capability such that they will be capable of solving a problem they have not seen before.

 

(c) Use inductive reasoning, mathematics, or statistics to solve problems in natural science

Math 120 is a prerequisite to Physics 201. Algebra and trigonometry is used the first day of class and is an essential part of the class.

 

(d) Engage in independent and collaborative learning

Developing problem solving ability is both a collaborative and independent learning experience. Students do study together and help each other solve problems. However, the quizzes and exams are taken individually. The laboratory assignments are done in groups of two.

 

(e) Identify, find, and use the tools of information science as it relates to natural science

The primary source of information for the student is the textbook. This year the textbook comes with four CD’s that contain demonstrations, tutorials on the concepts, simulations of the homework problems, and link to web sites for additional information on each chapter.

 

(f)Critically evaluate both source and content of scientific information;

The burden of proof in physics is high and each week as new concepts are added demonstrations and laboratories are performed to convince the students that the concepts are true. The basic premise of all science courses is that students should not accept the word of an authority figure that a statement is true but should prove it themselves. It is this questioning of authority that students develop critical thinking skills which they can apply to new statements to convince themselves what is opinion and what is fact.

 

(g) Recognize and correct scientific misconceptions

Physics 201 and 202 spends every week challenging students’ misconceptions of the motion of objects.

Courses that satisfy the laboratory requirement in the natural sciences will additionally provide students the opportunity to practice scientific inquiry through hands-on investigations and to analyze and report the results of those investigations.

The course descriptions below show fourteen lab assignments per semester in which students perform hands-on investigations in which they analyze data and report the results.

 

2. Course Requirements and learning activities

Students are required to take weekly quizzes, hour exams, tests, and a comprehensive final. Weekly lab reports are also due. Successful students soon learn that they need to be active in the learning process. They need to come to class, ask questions, due the homework, attend labs, and turn in lab reports. If general physics was an inert body of knowledge that students need to memorize, then they could be successful in a passive role. However, problem solving requires student to be active learners and involved in their own learning.

3. Course Descriptions

 

General Physics 202 Winter, 2000

Instructor: Dr. Richard Shields Office: 114 E Phone: 457-5265

Email: rshields@winona.edu

Text: Physics, Fourth Edition, Cutnell and Johnson

University Studies Course - Natural Science Lab Course

Statement of University Studies Goals

Course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to…

(a) Understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural sciences;

(b) Apply those methods to solve problems that arise in the natural sciences;

(c) Use inductive reasoning, mathematics, or statistics to solve problems in natural science;
(d)Engage in independent and collaborative learning;

(e) Identify, find, and use the tools of information science as it relates to natural science

(f) Critically evaluate both source and content of scientific information;

(g) Recognize and correct scientific misconceptions

Students should develop an understanding how scientists approach and solve problems. The course starts with the simplest concepts and develops models to explain the concepts of thermodynamics and electricity and magnetism. As the students’ skills and knowledge expand, the models become more complex. Students are introduced to the laws of physics and some of the laboratory assignments are designed for students to verify these laws. (Objectives a, b, c, f, g) Misconceptions that students have about the topics are challenged and demonstration experiments and hand-on laboratory exercise help the students develop a new framework based on mathematical equations. (Objectives a, b, c, f, g) The burden of proof in physics is high and each week as new concepts are added; demonstrations and laboratories are performed to convince the students that the concepts are true. The basic premise of all science courses is that students should not accept the word of an authority figure that a statement is true but should prove it themselves. It is this questioning of authority that students develop critical thinking skills which they can apply to new statements to convince themselves what is opinion and what is fact. (Objectives a, b, c, f, g)

Students are required to take weekly quizzes, hour exams, tests, and a comprehensive final. Weekly lab reports are also due. (Objectives d) Successful students soon learn that they need to be active in the learning process. They need to come to class, ask questions, due the homework, attend labs, and turn in lab reports. Solutions of the problems can be found in the library reserve section or at the web site (http://www.harcourtcollege.com/physics ). The text comes with four CD's that provide tutorial sections, computer simulations, solutions to selected homework problems. (Objectives d, e) If general physics was an inert body of knowledge that students need to memorize, then they could be successful in a passive role. However, problem solving requires student to be active learners and involved in their own learning.

Date Chapter Problems

Jan. 12 12. Temperature and Heat 20, 23, 25, 34, 38, 44, 46, 54, 64

21 13 The Transfer of Heat 10, 12, 15, 18, 22, 27

26 14. The Ideal Gas Law 16, 20, 24, 34, 36,

and Kinetic Theory

Feb. 2 15. Thermodynamics 14, 17, 26, 28, 30, 36, 42 46, 53, 63,

  1. Test 1

13 18. Electrical Forces 13, 16, 25, 30, 42, 35, and Electric Field 39, 43, 45, 46, 47, 69

  1. 19. Electric Potential Energy 10, 18, 22, 25, 27, 37,
  2. 28 20. Electric Circuits 17, 21, 23, 26, 29, 39,

    47, 53, 56, 63, 65, 69,

    71, 79, 81, 82, 92, 99,

    March 1 Test 2

  3. –17 No Classes, Spring Break

20 21. Magnetism 8, 9, 12, 19, 23, 31, 32, 38, 45, 56, 58, 60, 63

27 22. Electromagnetic 5, 7, 10, 16, 17, 19, 21,

Induction 27, 30, 34, 50, 52, 70,

76

April 3 23. Alternating Current 11, 14, 18, 19, 22, 26,

Circuits 29, 31, 35, 44

7 24. Electromagnetic Waves --

10 Test 3

12 25. The Reflection of Light 7,8,10,13,19,21, 37

19 26. The Refraction of Light 12, 16, 22, 27, 32, 43,

46, 53, 54, 57, 66, 67, 70

26 27. Interference and Wave 5, 7, 14, 24, 26, 42, 46

Nature of Light

May 3 29. Particles and Waves ---

30. The Nature of the Atom ----

31. Nuclear Physics ----

17 Final Exam 8-10 AM

Laboratory Schedule

Date Experiment

Jan. 11 1. Heat of Vaporization

18 No Lab

25 2. Mechanical Equivalent of Heat

Feb. 1 3. Electric Field and Equipotential Lines

8 4. Discharging of a Capacitor

15 5. Wheatstone Bridge

22 6. Electrical Measurements

29 7. Kirchoff’s Laws

March 21 8. Ratio of Charge to Mass for the Electron

28 9. Oscilloscope

April 4 10. A. C. Circuits

11 11. Dispersion of Light

18 12. Spherical Lenses

25 13. Diffraction

May 2 14. Hydrogen Spectrum

9 15. Half Life

 

GRADING POLICY

1. There will be no make-up exams or quizes given. The lowest quiz will be thrown out.

2. The point distribution is given below. The final exam will be given on the assigned day.

3 Hour Exams 300 pts.
Quizes 200 pts.
Lab. Reports 150 pts
Final Exam 200 pts.

Total pts. 850 pts

3. The following scale will be used to determine the grade.

85% and Above A
75% to 85% B
60% to 75% C
50% to 60% D
Below 50% E