WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

PROPOSALS FOR NEW COURSES

Department   __Physics_________________         Date____1/22/01______________

Course No.  140                Course Name     Energy         Credits 3

This Proposal is for a    ____ Graduate Course          __X__ Undergraduate Course

Applies to        _____ Major    _____Minor         _____ General Education

                    ___ Required             ____ Required     _____ Humanities

        ___ Elective                ____ Elective       __X_ Natural Science                                                                                             ____Social Sciences                                                                                             ____ Different Culture

                                                                                           ____ Allied Studies

Prerequisites  ___None_____________________________________________________

Grading        ____ Grade only       ____ P/NC only            __X__ Grade and P/NC Option

Frequency of Offering        _____Every Semester___________________

Please attach to this proposal form a complete description of the course including:

A. Course Description

1. Catalog description (please limit to approximately 30 words)

2. Course outline of the major topics and subtopics (minimum of two degree outline).

3. Basic instructional plan and methods utilized.

4. Course requirements (papers, lab work, projects, etc.) and means of evaluation.

5. Textbook(s) or alternatives (list two or three).

6. List of references and bibliography.

 

B. Rationale

1. Please provide a statement of the major focus and objectives of the course.

2. Specify how this new course contributes to the department’s curriculum.

3. Indicate any course(s) which may be dropped if this course is approved.

 

C. Impact of this Course on other Departments, Programs, Majors, or Minors

1. Does this course increase or decrease the total credits required by a major or minor of any other department?  If so, which department(s)?

2. List the departments, if any, which have been consulted about this proposal.

 

D. General Education Course Proposals

1. Please provide a brief written justification for including this course among those designated for general education.

2. If this course is also to be open to majors, indicate clearly how it is designed to serve the needs of both majors and non-majors.

 

Departmental Contact Person for this Proposal:

Name _Richard Shields_ Phone    457-5265    Email rshields@winona.edu

 

 

  

FINANCIAL AND STAFFING DATA SHEET

Include a Financial and Staffing Data Sheet with any proposal for a new course, new program, or revised program.

Please answer the following questions completely.  Provide supporting data.

1. Would this course/program be taught with existing staff or with new/additional staff?  If this course would be taught by adjunct faculty, include a rationale.

Existing staff would teach this course.

 

2. What impact would approval of this course/program have on current course offerings?   Please discuss number of sections of current offerings, dropping of courses, etc.

There are 5 sections of physics 115 taught this year. Next year Physics 115 will be reduced to 4 section and 1 section of Physics 140 will be added. The following year, Physics 140 will be offered every semester.

 

3. What effect would approval of this course/program have on the department supplies?   Include data to support expenditures for staffing, equipment, supplies,

Instructional resources, etc.

Other than an increase cost in copying and paper, the Physics Department already has the demonstration equipment needed.

 

                                                                                                ______________________________________________________

 Department Chair

                                                                                                ______________________________________________________

Dean of College

 

 

WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

APPROVAL FORM

 

The attached proposal was approved by the Department on ____/____/____

____________________________________________ Department Chair

 

Recommendation of Dean of College: ____ Approved ____ Disapproved on ____/____/____

 

____________________________________________

Dean of College

 

Recommendation of A2C2 Committee:    ____ Approved   ____ Disapproved on     ____/____/____

 

 For  ____ Major               ____ Minor               ____ General Education

                                                ____________________________________________

Chair of A2C2

 

Recommendation of Graduate Council     ____ Approved     ____ Disapproved on   ____/____/____

 

____________________________________________ 

Chair of Graduate Council                                                                                 ____________________________________________

Director of Graduate Studies

 

Recommendation of Faculty Senate:   ____ Approved ____ Disapproved on    ____/____/____

                                                ____________________________________________

President of Faculty Senate

 

Recommendation of Academic Vice-President:  ____ Approved ____ Disapproved on    ____/____/____     

 

 ______________________________________________

Academic Vice-President 

                                                      

Decision of President:  ____ Approved ____ Disapproved on     ____/____/____

 

_____________________________________________

President       

 

A. Course Description

  1. Catalog Description
  2. 140 Energy– 3 s.h.

    This course focuses on energy needs, trends, and long term prospects and resource supplies. The physics of energy, atoms, nuclei, thermal energy, solar energy, alternative energies and consequences of energy production are discussed. The present governmental energy policy will be discussed along with proposed changes to the policies. No Prerequisite. Offered every semester.

  3. Statement of the major focus and objectives of the course
  4. Energy is a course that focuses on the problem facing our society with the supply, distribution, and use of energy. As needed, the laws and principles of physics will be introduced to the student so that the student will have a better understanding of the country’s complex energy system. Alternative energies will be discussed so that the student has some vision of what in store for the country’s future energy sources.

    The objectives of the course is for the student to develop an understanding of the scientific principles involved in energy production and use so that the student becomes a better informed citizen and consumer. The students should learn the consequences of the different choices that are being made presently and in the future by their government.

  5. Course Outline
  6. I. Introduction

    A. Exponential Growth and a Finite World

    B. World’s Energy Overview

    C. The Policy of Not Having an Energy Policy

    II. The Physics of Work, Energy and Power

    A. Newton’s Laws of Motion

    B. Work and Power

    III. Electricity

    A. Consumption of Electrical Energy: Projections and Exponential Growth.

    B. Physics of the Production and Distribution of Electricity

    C. Atoms and Chemical Energy

    D. Efficiency of Energy Generation and Thermodynamics

    E. Environmental Effects of Utility Generating Facilities

    F. De-regulation of Electrical Industry

    IV. Fossil Fuels

    A. Coal - Resources and Pollution

    B. Oil - Resources and Pollution

    1. Transportation

    2. Home Heating

    C. Natural Gas - Resources and Pollution

    D. Greenhouse Effect and Air pollution

    1. Climate Change and Human Activity

    2. Clean Air Act

    V. Nuclear Energy

    A. Physics of Nuclear Reactors

    B. Safety of Nuclear Energy

    C. The Government Policy on Storage of Nuclear Waste

    VI. Solar Energy.

    A. Solar Heating and Cooling

    B. Photo-voltaic Cells

    C. Biomass Energy.

    VII. Wind Energy

    VIII. Energy Storage - Electric Car

    IX. Conservation: An Important Energy Source

    X. Recycling and Reuse

  7. Basic Instructional Plan and Methods Utilized
  8. The class will meet for lectures three hours per week. The lecture will have demonstrations, audiovisual aids, and classroom discussion.

  9. Course Requirements
  10. Grades will be determined by examinations, a short paper on an energy topic, and a final exam.

  11. Textbooks

Energy, Second Edition, Gordon J Aubrecht, Prentice Hall, 1995

Energy and the Environment, Robert Ristinen and Jack Kraushaar, Wiley, 1999

7. References

Energy and Problems of a Technical Society, 2/E ,Jack Kraushaar and Robert Ristinen, Wiley, 1993

Environmental Physics Egbert Boeker and Rienk van Grondelle, Wiley, 2000

 

Physics of the Environment and Climate, G�rard Guyot, Wiley, 1998

  1. Rationale
  2. During the energy crisis of the 1970’s, the Physics Department developed and offered for years an energy course. As the energy crisis faded from memory, so did the interest in an energy course. With the sudden rise in oil prices, there is a renewed interest in energy. This course gives the physics department an opportunity to teach some physics’ principles and involve the student in a topic that should be interesting to them.

    Also this topic fits nicely into the Science and Social Policy area of University Study. Energy policy offers the students a chance to study how policy has had a great effect on the their own lives. The government has made and will continue to make energy decisions that effect all its citizens. The course will present how those choices effect their daily lives.

  3. Notification

No other department will be effected by this course.

  1. "G" Courses

Does not apply

  1. General Education Course

This course is being submitted as a University Studies course in Science and Social Policy category. For existing students under the present general education requirements, this course would be a natural science course with no lab.

 

  

 

University Studies Course Approval

Department or Program: ____Physics___________________________________

 

Course Number: ___140______

Course Title: Energy________________________________________

Catalog Description: This course focuses on energy needs, trends, and long term prospects and resource supplies. The physics of energy, atoms, nuclei, thermal energy, solar energy, alternative energies and consequences of energy production are discussed. The present governmental energy policy will be discussed along with proposed changes to the policies. No Prerequisite. Offered every semester.

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2 _____.

OR

This is a new course proposal _X__. (If this is a new course proposal, the WSU Curriculum Approval Form must also be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)

 

Department Contact Person for this course: Dr. Richard Shields

 

Email: rshields@winona.edu

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

The proposed course is designed to satisfy the requirements in (select one area only):

 

Course Requirements

A. Basic Skills: (October 4, 2000)

______ 1. College Reading and Writing

______ 2. Oral Communication

______ 3. Mathematics

______ 4. Physical Development and Wellness

B. Arts & Sciences Core: (November 1, 2000)

______ 1. Humanities

______ 2. Natural Science

______ 3. Social Science

______ 4. Fine & Performing Arts

 

C. Unity and Diversity: (January 17, 2001)

______ 1. Critical Analysis

__X__ 2. Science and Social Policy

______ 3. a. Global Perspectives

______ b. Multicultural Perspectives

______ 4. a. Contemporary Citizenship

______ b. Democratic Institutions

Flagged Courses: (February 14, 2001)

______ 1. Writing

______ 2. Oral

______ 3. a. Mathematics/ Statistics

______ b. Critical Analysis

 

 

University Studies

Unity and Diversity

Science and Social Policy

 

1. Outcomes for Physics 140, Energy

This course includes requirements and learning activities that promotes students' abilities to

a. Understand the scientific foundation of the topics

The concept of energy has its foundation in physics. Class time will be spent developing the energy concepts. To understand the energy of motion, heat energy, solar energy, etc. requires basic concepts of physics. Newton's laws of motion, the laws of thermodynamics, and other concepts will need to be covered so that the students will understand the energy choices that are made.

 

b. Understand the social, ethical, historical, and /or political implications

A review of the energy use in the industrial age will be given. Models of growth of energy usage will be used to predict future use and consequently the implications of that growth. It is important for students to understand that energy choices not only affect them personally but also affect the quality of life of society in general. The choices of energy have political, ethical, and economic consequences.

 

c. Understand and articulate the need to integrate issues of science with social policy

Energy and environmental policies are topics of concern for all citizens. Whether it is a choice to buy a gas guzzling SUV or a concern to maintain a wilderness in Alaska, citizens find energy policies being debated all the time. This course hopes to bring those debates in focus and hopefully the students will learn how scientific principles can help sort out what is truthful and what is opinion.

 

d. Evaluate the various policy options relevant to the social dilemmas posed by the science

The debate over nuclear energy is a good example of a social dilemma. The problems of safety, waste storage, and cost must be weighed against the need for a proven technology as the world oil supply shrinks.

 

e. Articulate, choose among, and defend various policy and/or scientific options to cope with the challenges created

A classroom debate on the challenges our country faces on energy use would be interesting. Should we depend on our present energy sources or should we encourage alternate energy sources? Should we continue without an energy policy? Should we preserve wildlife areas in our country or open them up to energy exploration? The energy dilemma is perfect format to have students think about the choices they make and then defend those choices in a logical manner.

 

2. Course Requirements and learning activities

Students will be expected to attend class and be an active learner. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, classroom discussion and web presentation. Hour exams, final, a research paper and classroom participation will determine students' grades.

 

3. Course Description

Physics 140 Energy

University Studies: Science and Social Policy

General Education: Natural Science (no laboratory)

The purpose of the Science and Social Policy requirement in the University Studies program is to promote students' understanding of the interrelated concerns of society and the sciences. These courses should integrate issues related to one of the natural sciences with the social and government policy decisions that stem from these issues. These courses include requirements and learning activities that promotes students' abilities to

a. understand the scientific foundation of the topics;

b. understand the social, ethical, historical, and /or political implications;

c. understand and articulate the need to integrate issues of science with social policy;

d. evaluate the various policy options relevant to the social dilemmas posed by the science; and

e. articulate, choose among, and defend various policy and /or scientific options to cope with the challenges created.

I. Introduction

A. Exponential Growth and a Finite World (Objective a)

B. World’s Energy Overview (Objective b)

C. The Policy of Not Having an Energy Policy (Objective b, d, e)

Classroom Debate: Should the world's population growth be controlled? (Objective e)

II. The Physics of Work, Energy and Power (Objective a)

A. Newton’s Laws of Motion (Objective a)

B. Work and Power (Objective a)

III. Electricity

A. Consumption of Electrical Energy: Projections and Exponential Growth. (Objective b, c, d, e)

B. Physics of the Production and Distribution of Electricity (Objective a)

C. Atoms and Chemical Energy (Objective a)

D. Efficiency of Energy Generation and Thermodynamics (Objective a)

E. Environmental Effects of Utility Generating Facilities (Objective b, c, d, e)

F. De-regulation of Electrical Industry (Objective b, c, d, e)

Classroom Debate: Should the government regulate the electrical utilities or should they de-regulate? (Objective e)

IV. Fossil Fuels

A. Coal - Resources and Pollution (Objective b, c, d, e)

B. Oil - Resources and Pollution (Objective b, c, d, e)

1. Transportation

2. Home Heating

C. Natural Gas - Resources and Pollution (Objective b, c, d, e)

D. Greenhouse Effect and Air pollution (Objective a, b)

1. Climate Change and Human Activity (Objective a, b)

2. Clean Air Act (Objective e)

V. Nuclear Energy (Objective a)

A. Physics of Nuclear Reactors (Objective a)

B. Safety of Nuclear Energy (Objective a)

C. The Government Policy on Storage of Nuclear Waste (Objective e)

Classroom Debate: Should the government encourage the construction of more nuclear power plants? (Objective e)

VI. Solar Energy. (Objective a)

A. Solar Heating and Cooling (Objective a)

B. Photo-voltaic Cells (Objective a)

C. Biomass Energy. (Objective a)

VII. Wind Energy (Objective a)

VIII. Energy Storage - Electric Car (Objective a)

Classroom Debate: Should the government develop a policy that would encourage alternative energy sources? (Objective e)

IX. Conservation: An Important Energy Source (Objective a, b, c, d, e)

X. Recycling and Reuse (Objective c, d, e)

Grading Policy:

3 hour exams @ 100 pts 300 pts

Research Paper 100 pts

Classroom Debates 100 pts

Final Exam 200 pts

Total points 700 pts

The research paper is an in-depth study of a particular energy policy. The topic for the paper is chosen by the student but must be approved by the instructor. Deadlines will be set for the outline , rough draft, and final copy.

Grades will be determined by the following grading scale:

A - 85% and above

B - 75% to 85%

C - 60% to 75%

D - 50% to 60%

F - below 50%