Approved by Faculty Senate

1. Outcomes for Fundamentals of Aviation Physics 200

This course is designed and includes academic experiences that promote students' abilities to:

a. Understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural sciences;

Fundamentals of Aviation (Physics 200) introduces the student to how the applied sciences,

specifically Physics, Earth Science, Physiology, and other sciences, relate to aviation as well

as lifes daily contact with science. This course is designed to introduce the participants to

scientific principles and laws, and then applies them to aircraft design and operation.

The student shall be introduced to, as well as work with, mathematical models, scientific

concepts and actual applications and activities. Examples of real life activities and problem

solving projects introduced in this course shall enable the student to realize how scientific

laws and concepts are a part of one's everyday life.

b. Apply those methods to solve problems that arise in the natural sciences;

Each class presentation, activity and out - of - class assignment is designed to achieve the

outcomes described in paragraph (a). This is done through a variety of media. Ideally a

concept (Laws and Principles) is introduced to the student and examples and exercises are

assigned and conducted. Focus then goes to how these are applied and utilized in aviation

as well as other day - to - day activities. The goals here are to have the students gain

knowledge, understanding, applications and correlation in the scientific areas for basic

aviation design and activities and, whenever possible, show how other areas of our daily

lives are also affected.

c. Use inductive reasoning, mathematics, or statistics to solve problems in natural

science;

Learning for this course shall be at the rote, understanding, application and correlation

levels. Course activities shall encompass utilizing mathematical models to

predict outcomes and then compare this with specific data collected and presented

by the literature - ie mathematical applications vs test flight data. Participants

shall also be challenged with new scenarios and then utilize correlation to solve

the problem and/or predict the results.

d. Engage in independent and collaborative learning;

Learning at its best is an independent as well as collaborative set of experiences. Students

shall study, complete exercises and analyze issues utilizing both venues. Traditional means,

as well as computer - aided instruction and exercises, shall be used. Student assessment

shall be accomplished independently.

e. Identify, find, and use tools of information science as it relates to natural science;

The primary sources for this course are the students themselves, the instructor, course text

materials (CD ROM & CAI), NASA tutorials, FAA instructional sources, as well as

handouts. Participants shall be required to access material and complete tutorials from the

internet - ie NASA Airfoil Tutorial - , computer aided instructional assignments, interactive

CD ROM tutorials and group assigned projects designed to meet this outcome.

f. Critically evaluate both sources and content of scientific information;

The area of aviation has many individuals and sources explaining how aircraft are powered,

lift is generated, how they navigate, the purposes, principles and application of systems, etc.

- KNOW TO MANY AS HANGAR TALK. This course, through its activities, allows

students to truly understand the applied side of the sciences as to aviation and other day -

to - day contacts with science while separating the scientific truth from falsehoods.

Examples of course activities in this area are Bernoulle's Principals vs Newton's Third Law

and Lift - Completion of NASA Foilsim Tutorial and evaluating the student to assertain

that learning levels of understanding and application have been attained - the gathering of

atmospheric data and then the application of known mathematical/scientific models to

project and/or confirm weather phenomena.

 

g. Recognize and correct scientific misconceptions;

As noted above this course is an applied science activity designed to help the student

better understand how and why aircraft fly as well as other activities in our day - to - day

life. The student challenges for this course are many and require knowledge and

understanding not limited to the physical principles and theories for aerodynamics,

propulsion, meteorology, navigation, physiology and the application there of. The core

question of this course is not WHY, BUT HOW.

 

2. Course Requirements and learning activities;

Participants are required to complete three (3) homework assignments - designed to eventually

be on computer and e-mail, (3) pop quizzes, up to (5) exercises, (3) section exams and a

comprehensive electronic or written final. In addition CD ROM, video and computer - aided

learning projects shall be assigned.

 

3. Course Description Physics 200 Fundamentals of Aviation;

An Applied Science course covering but not limited to the principles and laws of Physics,

Earth Science and Physiology as they relate to Aviation as well as one's daily contacts with

science- Non Laboratory University Studies Natural Science Course - Offered each semester.

Three (3) semester hours.

 

I. INSTRUCTOR: George Bolon

OFFICE: 114A Pastuer

PHONE 507-457-5260

TEXT: Jeppesen/Boeing - Private Pilot Manual - NASA - FOILSIM - U.S. Government

Aeronautical Information Manual - Weather Theory and Reports - Written

Knowledge Test - as well as Winona State University Aviation Multimedia Library

 

II. Major Focus University Studies Course - Natural Science Non Laboratory Course -

Satisfies three (3) semester hours of Natural Science Requirement

Statement of University Studies Goals

Fundamentals of Aviation is an applied science course designed to educate each student as to

how any why aircraft fly. The core scientific area in this course is physics with supplements

from mathematics, earth science, human biology and human factors. Scientific principles and

laws are introduced and then shown as to how they apply to aviation activities along with

other daily contacts one has with science.

Course participants shall be challenged by pre classroom reading, computer, and multimedia

material - individually as well as in groups, in class, with classroom oral, written and lap top

computer knowledge, understanding and application exercises and evaluations. Historically

this course has shown a building block approach works best and students who do not keep on

schedule and task achieve below expected results.

Each student shall receive supplemental assignments with activities and time lines as well as

the Professors lecture notes. With the integration of computer software, supplemental

material and assignments students have instantaneous feed back, reinforcement and guidance

as how to better understand and apply the principles, laws, concepts, knowledge,

understanding, and applications that are contained in the goals of this course.

 

III. Goals - The student shall gain knowledge, understanding and the application of;

1. Scientific Physical Principles and Laws that apply to aviation and other life activities at the

basic level:

a. Aerodynamics

b. Aircraft Design

c. Propulsion

d. Control

e. Systems

EXAM

2. Principles and Laws of weather and their application to Aviation as well as one's daily life:

a. Theory

b. Pattern

c. Interpretation

d. Application

EXAM

3. Scientific Principles and Laws that apply to aviation Performance and Navigation and the

application there of:

a. Predicting Performance

b. Weight and Balance

c. Navigation

1) Mathematical Model

2) Radio

3) Satellite/Long Range

4. Scientific Principles and Laws and their application to aviation:

a. Physiology

b. Human Factors Decision Making

EXAM

FINAL COMPREHENSIVE

Note: Participants shall need to apply a minimum of from six (6) to nine (9) hours time on task per week outside the classroom with some weeks needing more.

 

 

IV. Evaluation/Assessment

The participant's shall be assessed by completion of various exercise assignments, pop

quizzes, section knowledge, understanding and application examinations and one

comprehensive final. Final course grades are based on the following:

Outside Assignments 3 pts

Exercises 5 pts

Pop Quizzes 15 pts

Section Exams 45 pts

Final 60 pts

Total Available 128 pts

A = 115 - 128 pts 90% and above

B = 98 - 114 pts 76% - 89%

 

C = 90 - 97 pts 70% - 75%

D = 78 - 89 pts 60% - 69%

F = Below 77 pts

 

V. Policies

Student attendance and participation in classroom, outside exercises and individual/group

assignments are mandatory. Excused absences need to be handled whenever possible prior to

the date and in accordance with university policy. If a bonefide absence takes place and

advanced notice is not possible a case by case review shall be conducted by the instructor.

Dishonesty shall be handled in accordance with University catalog policy.

 

Physics 200 Fundamentals of Aviation
Class Syllabus
Winona State University
Pastuer 101

 

INSTRUCTOR: George Bolon
OFFICE: 114A Pastuer Hall, Office Hours as posted
PHONE 507-457-5260 (campus) 452-1937 (airport) 452-4295 (home)
TEXT: Jeppesen/Boeing - Private Pilot Manual - NASA - FOILSIM - U.S.
Government Aeronautical Information Manual - Weather Theory and Reports -
Written Knowledge Test - as well as Winona State University Aviation Multimedia Library

Course Description: An Applied Science course covering but not limited to the principles and laws of Physics,
Earth Science and Physiology as they relate to Aviation as well as ones daily contacts with science - Non
Laboratory University Studies Natural Science Course - Offered each semester - three (3) semester hours.

Course Requirements and learning activities: Participants are required to complete (3) homework
assignments - designed to eventually be on computer and e-mail, (3) pop quizzes, up to (5) exercises,
(3) section exams and a comprehensive, electronic or written final. In addition CD ROM, video and computer
aided learning projects shall be assigned.

Course Outcomes: This course is designed and includes academic experiences that promote students' abilities to:

a. Understand how scientists approach and solve problems in the natural Sciences;
   Fundamentals of Aviation (Physics 200) introduces the student to how the applied
    sciences, specifically Physics, Earth Science, Physiology, and other sciences, relate
    to aviation as well as lifes daily contact with science. This course is designed to
    introduce the participants to scientific principles and laws, and then applies them to
    aircraft design and operation. The student shall be introduced to, as well as work
    with, mathematical models, scientific concepts and actual applications and activities.
    Examples of real life activities and problem solving projects introduced in this
    course shall enable the student to realize how scientific laws and concepts are a part
    of one's everyday life.

b. Apply those methods to solve problems that arise in the natural sciences;
   
Each class presentation, activity and out - of - class assignment is designed to
    achieve the outcomes described in paragraph (a). This is done through a variety of
    media. Ideally a concept (Laws and Principles) is introduced to the student and
    examples and exercises are assigned and conducted. Focus then goes to how these
    are applied and utilized in aviation as well as other day - to - day activities. The
    goals here are to have the students gain knowledge, understanding, applications and
    correlation in the scientific areas for basic aviation design and activities and,
    whenever possible, show how other areas of our daily lives are also affected.

c. Use inductive reasoning, mathematics, or statistics to solve problems in
    natural science;
    Learning for this course shall be at the rote, understanding, application and
    correlation levels. Course activities shall encompass utilizing mathematical models
    to predict outcomes and then compare this with specific data collected and
    presented by the literature - ie mathematical applications vs test flight data.
    Participants shall also be challenged with new scenarios and then utilize correlation
    to solve the problem and/or predict the results.

d. Engage in independent and collaborative learning;
  
Learning at its best is an independent as well as collaborative set of experiences.
    Students shall study, complete exercises and analyze issues utilizing both venues.
    Traditional means, as well as computer - aided instruction and exercises, shall be
    used. Student assessment shall be accomplished independently.

e. Identify, find, and use tools of information science as it relates to natural
    science;
   The primary sources for this course are the students themselves, the instructor,
    course text materials (CD ROM & CAI), NASA tutorials, FAA instructional
    sources, as well as handouts. Participants shall be required to access material and
    complete tutorials from the internet - ie NASA Airfoil Tutorial - , computer aided
    instructional assignments, interactive CD ROM tutorials and group assigned
    projects designed to meet this outcome.

f. Critically evaluate both sources and content of scientific information;
  
The area of aviation has many individuals and sources explaining how aircraft are
   powered, lift is generated, how they navigate, the purposes, principles and
   application of systems, etc. - KNOW TO MANY AS HANGAR TALK. This
   course, through its activities, allows students to truly understand the applied side of
   the sciences as to aviation and other day - to - day contacts with science while
   separating the scientific truth from falsehoods. Examples of course activities in this
   area are Bernoulle's Principals vs Newton's Third Law and Lift - Completion of
   NASA Foilsim Tutorial and evaluating the student to assertain that learning levels
   of understanding and application have been attained - the gathering of atmospheric
   data and then the application of known mathematical/scientific models to project
   and/or confirm weather phenomena.

g. Recognize and correct scientific misconceptions;
  
As noted above this course is an applied science activity designed to help the student
    better understand how and why aircraft fly as well as other activities in our day - to -
    day life. The student challenges for this course are many and require knowledge and
    understanding not limited to the physical principles and theories for aerodynamics,
    propulsion, meteorology, navigation, physiology and the application there of. The
    core question of this course is not WHY, BUT HOW.

Goals: Students shall gain knowledge, understanding and the application of:

1. Scientific Physical Principles and Laws as they apply to aviation and other life
    activities at the basic level:
         a. Aerodynamics
         b. Aircraft Design
         c. Propulsion
         d. Control
         e. Systems

EXAM

2. Principles and Laws of weather and their application to Aviation as well as ones daily life:
          a. Theory
          b. Pattern
          c. Interpretation
         d. Application

EXAM

3. Scientific Principles and Laws that apply to aviation Performance and Navigation
   and the application there of:
         a. Predicting Performance
         b. Weight and Balance
         c. Navigation
             1) Mathematical Model
             2) Radio
             3) Satellite/Long Range

4. Scientific Principles and Laws and their application to aviation:
          a. Physiology
          b. Human Factors Decision Making

EXAM

Final Comprehensive:
Note: Participants shall apply a minimum of from (6) to (9) hours time on task per week outside the classroom with some weeks needing more.

Evaluation/Assessment: Participants shall be assessed by completion of various exercise assignments, quizzes,
section knowledge, understanding and application examinations and one comprehensive final.

Outside Assignments 3 pts
Exercises                   5 pts
Pop Quizzes            15 pts
Section Exams         45 pts
Final                         60 pts
Total Available       128 pts

A = 115 - 128 pts 90% and above
B = 98 - 114 pts 76% - 89%
C = 90 - 97 pts 70% - 75%
D = 78 - 89 pts 60% - 69%
F = Below 77 pts

Policies: Student attendance and participation in classroom, outside exercises and individual/group assignments
are mandatory. Excused absences need to be handled whenever possible prior to the date and in accordance
with university policy. If a bonefide absence takes place and advanced notice is not possible a case by case review
shall be conducted by the instructor. Dishonesty shall be handled in accordance with University catalog policy.

 

FUNDAMENTALS OF AVIATION
TOPICS OUTLINE
1

I. Human Factors/Physiology of Flight - a, b, c, d, e , f & g special emphasis c,2
    A. Aviation Physiology
         1. Vision
         2. Visual Illusions
         3. Human Disorientation
                a. Spatial
                b. Vestibular
         4. Respiration - Blood Gas Transfer
                a. Hypoxia
                b. Hypervetalation

( 1 Note:  Copy given to students shall have dates corresponding to chapter readings assignments, supplemental
activities -ie homework and exams.)

   B. Human Decision Making
        1. Process
        2. Attitude
   C. Effects of Alcohol & Drugs

II. Aircraft Systems - a, b, c, d, e, f, & g special emphasis a, b, c, f, & g
     A. Structural Design
         1. Mechanical Advantage
         2. Hydrualic Principles
     B. Power Plant Theory & Operations
         1. Operating Cycle & Useful Work
         2. Gas Turbine Design
         3. Principles of Fuel Distribution
         4. Ignition System
             a. Magneto Theory & Operation
             b. Normal & Abnormal Combustion
         5. Fuel Systems
             a. Pump Principles Design
             b. Vapor Lock
         6. Lubrication Systems
             a. Principles & Design
             b. Purposes
         7. Cooling - Thermo Transfer
         8. Propeller
             a. Principles & Design
             b. Types
             c. Aerodynamic Advantages
         9. Electrical Systems
             a. Basic D.C.Theory
             b. Alternator Design
             c. Circuits & Principals
   C. Flight Instruments
        1. Atmospheric Conditions
            a. Standard
            b. Lapse Rate
        2. Dynamic Pressure Instruments
            a. Principles & Design
            b. Operation
        3. Static Pressure Instruments
            a. Principles & Design
            b. Operation
        4. Gyrospocis Instruments
            a. Principles & Design
            b. Precession
            c. Operation
        5. Magnetic Compass
            a. Principal & Design
            b. Errors

III. Aerodynamic Principals - a, b, c, d, e, f, & g - special emphasis a, b, c, & e
      A. Forces of Flight - Foilsim
          1. Lift
              a. Formula
              b. Bemoullis
          2. Newton's Law of
              a. Force
              b. Motion
          3. Airfoils
              a. Design
                 1) Factors
                 2) Wind Tunnels
              b. Control
          4. High-Lift Devices
              a. Principles & Design
              b. Types
          5. Weight - Gravity - Mass
          6. Thrust
              a. Newton II & III Laws
              b. Vectors
          7. Drag
             a. Formula
             b. Types
             c. Ground Effect
     B. Stability
         1. Static
         2. Dynamic
         3. Aircraft Axes
             a. Center of Gravity
             b. Control
         4. Balance - First Order Levers
         5. Design Considerations
         6. Interaction of Stability Axes
    C. Aerodynamics of Maneuvering Flight
         1. Turning Tendencies
             a. Torque
             b. Precission
             c. P-Factor
             d. Slip Stream
         2. Design Considerations
         3. Lift to Drag Ratio
         4. Turning Force
             a. Centripetal
             b. Centrifugal
         5. Load Factor
         6. Limit Load Factor
            a. Calculations

IV. Aeronautical Chart Construction - a,b, c, d, e, f, & g
       A. Latitude & Longitude
       B. Types of Projections
V. Basic Weather - a, b, c, d, e, f, & g - special emphasis c, d, & e
      A. Theory
           1. Atmosphere & Standards
           2. Pressure & Circulation
           3. Corriolis
      B. Patterns
           1. Stability
           2. Temperature
           3. Moisture
           4. Clouds
           5. Precipitation
           6. Fronts
     C. Hazards
          1. Thunderstorms
          2. Turbulence
          3. Icing
          4. Visibility

VI. Interpreting Weather Data - a, b, c, d, e, f, & g - special emphasis on c, d, e, & f
      A. Forecasting
          1. Types
      B. Reports & Forecasts
          1. METARS
          2. TAFS
          3. FAs
          4. FDs
      C. Severe Weather Reports & Forecasts
           1. Hurricane Advisory
           2. Convective Outlook
           3. Airmet
           4. Sigmet
           5. Convective Sigmet
      D. Graphic Weather Data
           1. Surface Analysis
           2. Weather Depiction
           3. Radar Summary
           4. Weather Prognostic
      E. Sources
           1. Satellite
           2. NWO
           3. FSS

VII. Aircraft Performance - a, b, c, d, e, f, & g - special emphasis c, d, & e
     A. Predicting
          1. Mathematical Formulas
          2. Charts
          3. Graphs
    B. Weight & Balance
         1. Mathematical Formulas
         2. Charts
         3. Graphs
    C. Flight Paths
        1. Electronic Vector Application Method
        2. Computer Generated
        3. Manual Computer Generated

VIII. Navigation - a, b, c, d, e, f, & g - special emphasis on f & g
    A. Vector Applications
    B. VHF
        1. Principals
        2. Components
        3. Operations
    C. Low Frequency
        1. Principals
        2. Components
        3. Operations
     D. Advanced
          1. LORAN
               a. Principal
               b. Components
               c. Operation
          2. Global Positioning Satellites
              a. Principals
              b. Components
              c. Operation