Approved by Faculty Senate.

University Studies Course Approval

Department or Program: ______Physics______________________

Course Number: __340_______

Course Title: ____Modern Physics__________________________________

Catalog Description: 340 Modern Physics – 4 s.h.

A lecture –laboratory course in modern physics. Special relativity, kinetic theory, Bohr

Atom, quantum mechanics, atomic physics, nuclear physics and condensed matter

physics. Prerequisites: Physics 223 and Mathematics 165. Offered yearly

 

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2 __X__.

OR This is a new course proposal _____. (If this is a new course proposal, the WSU Curriculum Approval

Form must also be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)

Department Contact Person for this course ______Richard Shields___

Email: rshields@winona.edu_______

 

 

 

The proposed course is designed to satisfy the requirements in (select one area only):

Course Requirements:

A. Basic Skills:

______ 1. College Reading and Writing

______ 2. Oral Communication

______ 3. Mathematics

______ 4. Physical Development and Wellness

B. Arts & Sciences Core:

______ 1. Humanities

______ 2. Natural Science

______ 3. Social Science

______ 4. Fine & Performing Arts

C. Unity and Diversity:

 

______ 1. Critical Analysis

______ 2. Science and Social Policy

______ 3. a. Global Perspectives

______ b. Multicultural Perspectives

______ 4. a. Contemporary Citizenship

______ b. Democratic Institutions

Flagged Courses:

__X___ 1. Writing

______ 2. Oral

______ 3. a. Mathematics/ Statistics

______ b. Critical Analysis

 

Approval/Disapproval Recommendations

 

Department Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Dean's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved ____* Date:______

Dean's Signature_______________________ Date______

*In the case of a Dean's recommendation to disapprove a proposal a written rationale for the recommendation to disapprove shall be provided to USS

 

USS Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

University Studies Director's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

A2C2 Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date:______

A2C2 Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

FA President's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Academic Vice President's Recommendation: Approved____ Disapproved____ Date:______

VP's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

President's Decision: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

President's Signature_______________________ Date______

1. Outcomes for Modern Physics 340

The philosophy of the writing flag is a progression from formal write-ups of their laboratory experiences to style of scientific writing usually found in physics journals. The formal write-ups usually contain the following sections: the objective, theory, experimental apparatus, data and data analysis, and conclusions of the laboratory. As student progress through the course, the writing style changes to the style of a scientific paper in which references through footnotes direct the reader to where, for example, the theory or experimental apparatus is explained. Carefully chosen scientific papers will be given as reading assignments and to use as examples of writing style that the students should use in their final lab write-ups.

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. Practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields;

Students in Modern Physics will practice their writing skills by submitting formal laboratory write up.

b. Understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields;

With each laboratory experience, students will become better writers and more adapted to writing a scientific paper. For example, the first few labs will require a complete write-up with sections for theory, experiment, results and analysis. In the latter write-up, references can be used to replace sections and condense the write-up to a small compact form.

c. Adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields;

The first few labs will assume that the reader is a fellow physics student who is familiar with University Physics but is not knowledgeable of the lab. The later labs assume the reader is familiar with the theory of the lab. The first lab write-ups will concentrate on making the reader understand the labs while the final lab write-ups will assume the reader is a knowledgeable person and use references to explain the theory of lab. The write-up is used to communicate the results of the lab.

d. Make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields; and

In writing the lab write-up, students will be expected to include equations, tables of data, and graphs. Students will use computer software such as Cricket Graph and Equation Editor to generate publication quality reports.

e. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

Examples of key scientific papers will be examined with an emphasis on comparing experimental data with theoretically predicted outcomes. The degree to which predicted values match experimental data, within uncertainty, with be stressed.

2. Course Outline

Physics 340 - Modern Physics

University Studies - Writing Flag

Writing Outcomes for Modern Physics 340

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. Practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields; b. Understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields;

c. Adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields; d. Make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields; and

e. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

 

  1. Relativity
    1. Micheleson-Morley Experiment
    2. Einstein Postulates
    3. Time Dilation and Length Contraction
    4. Doppler Effect
    5. Lorentz Contraction
    6. Relativistic Momentum and Energy
    7. Mass and Binding Energy
    8. General Theory of Relativity

Exp. 1 – Speed of Light Objectives a, b, c, d, e

  1. The Kinetic Theory of Matter
    1. The Pressure of a gas
    2. Equipartition Theorem and Heat Capacities
    3. Distribution Functions
    4. Maxwell-Boltzmann Distribution

III. The Quantization of Electricity, Light and Energy

    1. J. J. Thomson Experiment
    2. Millikan’s Oil Drop Experiment
    3. Blackbody Radiation
    4. Photoelectric Effect
    5. Compton Scattering

Exp. 2 – e/m Objectives a, b, c, d, e

Exp. 3 – Millikan’s Oil Drop Objectives a, b, c, d, e

Exp. 4 – Photoelectric Effect Objectives a, b, c, d, e

  1. The Nuclear Atom
    1. Rutherford Scattering
    2. The Bohr Model of the Atom
    3. X-ray Spectra
    4. The Frank-Hertz Experiment

Exp. 5 – Measurement of Rydberg Constant Objectives a, b, c, d, e

Exp. 6 – Franck Hertz Experiment

  1. Electron Waves
    1. The deBroglie Relations
    2. Measurement of Electron Wavelength
    3. Wave Packets
    4. Uncertainty Principle
    5. Particle-Wave Duality

Exp. 7 – Bragg Diffraction Objectives a, b, c, d, e

Exp. 8 – Absorption of X-rays Objectives a, b, c, d, e

Exp. 9 – Moseley’s Law Objectives a, b, c, d, e

  1. The Schrodinger Equation
    1. The Schrodinger Equation in one Dimension
    2. The Infinite Square Well
    3. The Finite Square Well
    4. Expectation Values and Operators
    5. Transitions between Energy States
    6. The Simple harmonic Oscillator
    7. Reflection and Transmission of Waves
    8. The Schrodinger Equation in Three Dimensions
    9. The Schrodinger Equation for Two or More Particles

VII. Atomic Physics

    1. The Schrodinger Equation in Spherical Coordinates
    2. Quantization of Angular Momentum and Energy in the Hydrogen Atom
    3. The Hydrogen – Atom Wave Functions
    4. Electron Spin
    5. Addition of Angular Momenta and the Spin-Orbit Effect
    6. Ground States of Atoms; The Periodic Table
    7. Excited States and Spectra of Alkali Atom
  1. Condensed Matter Physics
    1. Ionic Solids
    2. Covalent Solid
    3. Band Theory of Solids
    4. Electrons in Metals
    5. Superconductivity
    6. Semiconductors
    7. Super fluids

Exp. 10 – Electron Spin Resonance Objectives a, b, c, d, e

VIII Nuclear Physics

    1. Discovery of Neutron
    2. Ground-State Properties of Nuclei
    3. Radioactivity
    4. Nuclear Reaction
    5. Detection of Particles
    6. The Shell Model

Exp. 11 Half-life of Radioactive Element Objectives a, b, c, d, e

Exp. 12 Absorption of Beta Radiation Objectives a, b, c, d, e

  1. Elementary Particles
    1. The Four Basic Forces
    2. Particles and Antiparticles
    3. Families of Particles
    4. Conservation Laws
    5. Particle Interactions and Decays
    6. The Quark Model
    7. The Standard Model