Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

 

University Studies Course Approval

Department or Program: __Physics__________________________________

Course Number: ___370__

Course Title: ________Optics_____________________________

Catalog Description: ___370 Optics 4 s.h.

A study of geometrical optics, the wave theory of light, interference, diffraction,

polarization, magneto-and electro-optics, lasers, and holograms. Lecture-laboratory

course. Prerequisites: PHYS 202 or PHYS 223 and MATH 165. Offered every two

years__________________________________________

 

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2 _X__.

OR This is a new course proposal _____. (If this is a new course proposal, the WSU Curriculum Approval

Form must also be completed as in the process prescribed by WSU Regulation 3-4.)

Department Contact Person for this course _____Richard Shields___________

Email: _____rshields@winona.edu

 

 

The proposed course is designed to satisfy the requirements in (select one area only):

Course Requirements:

A. Basic Skills:

______ 1. College Reading and Writing

______ 2. Oral Communication

______ 3. Mathematics

______ 4. Physical Development and Wellness

B. Arts & Sciences Core:

______ 1. Humanities

______ 2. Natural Science

______ 3. Social Science

______ 4. Fine & Performing Arts

C. Unity and Diversity:

 

______ 1. Critical Analysis

______ 2. Science and Social Policy

______ 3. a. Global Perspectives

______ b. Multicultural Perspectives

______ 4. a. Contemporary Citizenship

______ b. Democratic Institutions

Flagged Courses:

__X__ 1. Writing

______ 2. Oral

______ 3. a. Mathematics/ Statistics

______ b. Critical Analysis

 

Approval/Disapproval Recommendations

 

Department Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Dean's Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved ____* Date:______

Dean's Signature_______________________ Date______

*In the case of a Dean's recommendation to disapprove a proposal a written rationale for the recommendation to disapprove shall be provided to USS

 

USS Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

University Studies Director's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

A2C2 Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved_____ Date:______

A2C2 Chairperson Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

FA President's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

Academic Vice President's Recommendation: Approved____ Disapproved____ Date:______

VP's Signature_______________________ Date______

 

President's Decision: Approved_____ Disapproved____ Date:______

President's Signature_______________________ Date______

1. Outcomes for Optics 370

The philosophy of the writing flag is a progression from formal write-ups of their laboratory experiences to style of scientific writing usually found in physics journals. The formal write-ups usually contain the following sections: the objective, theory, experimental apparatus, data and data analysis, and conclusions of the laboratory. As student progress through the course, the writing style changes to the style of a scientific paper in which references through footnotes direct the reader to where, for example, the theory or experimental apparatus is explained. Carefully chosen scientific papers will be given as reading assignments and to use as examples of writing style that the students should use in their final lab write-ups.

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. Practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields;

Students in Optics will practice their writing skills by submitting formal laboratory write up.

b. Understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields;

With each laboratory experience, students will become better writers and more adapted to writing a scientific paper. For example, the first few labs will require a complete write-up with sections for theory, experiment, results and analysis. In the latter write-up, references can be used to replace sections and condense the write-up to a small compact form.

c. Adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields;

The first few labs will assume that the reader is a fellow physics student who is familiar with University Physics but is not knowledgeable of the lab. The later labs assume the reader is familiar with the theory of the lab. The first lab write-ups will concentrate on making the reader understand the labs while the final lab write-ups will assume the reader is a knowledgeable person and use references to explain the theory of lab. The write-up is used to communicate the results of the lab.

d. Make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields; and

In writing the lab write-up, students will be expected to include equations, tables of data, and graphs. Students will use computer software such as Cricket Graph and Equation Editor to generate publication quality reports.

e. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

Examples of key scientific papers will be examined with an emphasis on comparing experimental data with theoretically predicted outcomes. The degree to which predicted values match experimental data, within uncertainty, with be stressed.

2. Course Outline

Physics 370 - Optics

University Studies - Writing Flag

Writing Outcomes for Modern Physics 340

These courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to...

a. Practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields; b. Understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields;

c. Adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields; d. Make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields; and

e. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

Text: Optics, 3rd Edition, by Hect

Instructor: Dan Bloom Pasteur 114 C Telephone: 457- 5390

dbloom@winona.edu

Schedule

Chapters 1 and 2 Introduction and Wave Motion

Chapter 3 Electromagnetic Theory of Light

Chapter 4 The Propagation of Light

Exam I

Chapter 5 Lenses

Chapter 6 Thick Lenses

Chapter 8 Polarization

Chapter 9 Interference

Exam II

Chapter 10 Diffraction

Chapter 12 Coherence

Chapter 13 Lasers

Final Exams

Lab Schedule (Writing Flag objectives a, b, c, d, e)

Exp. 1 Measurements of Light Intensity

Exp. 2 Focal Length of Thin Lens

Exp. 3 Focal Length and the Lens-makers' Formula

Exp. 4 Dispersion of Light by Glass

Exp. 5 Telescopes

Exp. 6 Polarization - Malus' Law

Exp. 7 Double Slit Diffraction

Exp. 8 Single Slit Diffraction

Exp. 9 Diffraction Gratings and the Spectrograph

Exp. 10 The Michelson Interferometer

Exp. 11 Filter Transmittance

Exp. 12 Fresnel Reflection

Exp. 13 Numerical Aperture of an Optical Fiber